Faculty of engineering and natural sciences department of genetics and bioengineering first cycle study program specification



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Course Code: GBE 108

Course Name: GENERAL CHEMISTRY

Level: Undergraduate

Year: I

Semester: II

ECTS Credits: 6

Status: Mandatory

Hours/Week: 3+2

Total Hours: 45+30

Course Description

The aim of this course is to introduce the students to basic general chemistry principles and to prepare them for further advanced chemistry, material science, practical, environmental, and electronics courses so that they will be able to follow concepts related to the chemistry of elements, atomic structure, electron configuration and periodicity, ionic and covalent bonding, molecular geometry and chemical bonding theory, chemical stoichiometry, the gaseous state, liquids and solids, acids and bases. The course will cover descriptive chemistry, elements and compounds, basic chemical calculations, mole problems, stoichiometry and solution concentrations, gas laws, thermochemistry, quantum theory and electronic structure of atoms, periodic properties of the elements, nuclear chemistry, and chemical bonding. This is taken concurrently with a laboratory course.

Course Objectives

The cognitive, affective and behavioral objectives of this course are following:

  • Introduction to the basic concepts of chemistry.

  • Preparing students for other advanced chemistry courses, material science, practical, environmental, and electronics courses.

  • Enabling students to follow subjects related to the chemistry of elements, liquid and solid state, and spectroscopy.

Course Content

(weekly plan)



Week 1: Introduction

Week 2: Basic terms and expressions

Week 3: Metric units in chemistry

Week 4: Atomic and molecular masses

Week 5: Matter and the composition of matter (atoms, elements and PSE, molecules and compounds)

Week 6: Basic calculations in chemistry

Week 7: Appearance of matter (aggregate state and phases, gases, liquids and solutions, solids)

Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9: Chemical reactions and chemical equilibrium

Week 10: Acids and bases

Week 11: pH

Week 12: Complexes

Week 13: Electrochemistry

Week 14: Thermodynamic considerations

Week 15: Kinetic consideration and stoichiometry



Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK
LABORATORY CONTENT

Week 1: Beginning of classes

Week 2, Lab 1: Lab safety

Week 3, Lab 2: Atomic structure and electron configurations

Week 4, Lab 3: Naming inorganic compounds; Molecular mass calculation and percent composition

Week 5, Lab 4: Amount of substance and concentrations

Week 6, Lab 5: Reactions of Group I and Group II cations; Basic lab equipment

Week 7, Lab 6: Reactions of cations Groups III, IV and V



Week 8:MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9, Lab 7: pH value: Calculations and experimental determination

Week 10 Lab 8: Buffer capacity

Week 11, Lab 9: Determining HCl concentration: Acid-base titration

Week 12, Lab 10: Separation of photosynthetic pigments from higher plants by paper chromatography

Week 13, Lab 11: Determination of iron content in green vitriol



Week 14: Preparation for practical exam

Week 15: Practical exam from lab course

Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK

Teaching Methods

Description

  • Interactive lectures and communication with students

  • Discussions and group work

  • Presentations

  • Laboratory work




Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

0 %

Lab/Practical Exam

20 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

20 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

20 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

40 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course, students should be able to:

    1. Name the units used in chemistry

    2. Describe atomic and molecular structures

    3. Recall chemical reactions

    4. Clarify electrochemistry

    5. Describe stoichiometry

    6. Grasp skills needed in the chemistry lab

    7. Apply basic calculations needed for more advanced courses: preparing molar, percent solutions, etc.

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


None

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

Petrucci, R. H., Harwood, W. S., & Herring, F. G. (2007). General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications, 9th ed. Upper Saddle River, NY, USA: Prentice Hall


Recommended Literature

Whitten K., Davis R., Peck L., & Stanley G. (2010). General Chemistry, 7th ed. California, USA: Brooks/Cole.

ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

15

3

45

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

2

30

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Final Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

15

15

Preparation for Final Examination

1

15

15

Assignment / Homework / Project




20

20

Seminar / Presentation




20

20

Total Workload

149

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

6




Course Code: MTH 102

Course Name: CALCULUS II

Level: Undergraduate

Year: I

Semester: II

ECTS Credits: 6

Status: Mandatory

Hours/Week: 3+2

Total Hours: 45+30

Course Description

Use of calculus is widespread in science, engineering, medicine, business, industry, and many other fields. Calculus also provides important tools in understanding functions and has led to the development of new areas of mathematics including real and complex analysis, topology, and non-Euclidean geometry.

Course Objectives

1-To expand understanding of mathematical topics that may have been previously studied.

2-To introduce and explore topics that possibly have not been part of the student’s mathematical experience.

3-To develop an appreciation for the development of mathematical thought.

4-To learn the application of mathematics in real life problems and analyzing the results.



Course Content

(weekly plan)



01-Vectors; Dot Products, Cross Products

02-Lines and Planes, Polar Coordinates

03-Surfaces and Coordinate Systems, Parameterized Curves

04-Arc Length and Curvature, Velocity and Acceleration

05-Functions of Several Variables, Limits, Continuity, Partial Derivatives

06-Tangent Planes and Linear Approximation, Chain Rule

07-Gradient, Directional Derivatives, 2nd Order Derivatives, Local Extrema

08-Local Extrema, Lagrange Multipliers

09-MIDTERM

10-Double Integrals, Iterated Integrals, Applications of Double Integrals

11-Triple Integrals, Transformation of Coordinates

12-Line Integrals In R2, Line Integrals in R3

13-Surface Integrals

14-Green's Theorem, Stokes' Theorem

15-Divergence Theorem

16-FINAL


Teaching Methods

Description

1-Lectures

2-Recitation

3-Problem solving

4-Exercises






Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

25 %

Lab/Practical Exam

0 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

0 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

25 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

50 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of the course, the students should be able to:

01-understand and apply two and three dimensional cartesian coordinate system

02-recognize and classify the equations and shapes of quadratic surfaces

03-use the properties of vectors and operations with vectors

04-recognize and construct the equations of lines and planes

05-operate with vector functions, find their derivatives and integrals, find the arc length

06-understand and use the concept of a function of several variables, find its domain

07-calculate the limits of multivariable functions and prove the nonexistence of a limit

08-find partial derivatives using the properties of differentiable multivariable functions and basic rules

09-apply partial derivatives for finding equations of tangent planes, normal lines, and for extreme values

10-evaluate double and triple integrals in cartesian, polar, and cylindrical coordinates

11-apply multiple integrals for computing areas and volumes

12-understand and use integration in vector fields

13-find line integrals and flux using Green’s Theorem

14-find circulation of a vector field using Stoke’s Theorem

15-use Divergence Theorem to find the flux of a vector field



Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


Calculus I

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

Thomas's Calculus, Eleventh Edition, George B. Thomas, Pearson International Edition, 2005

Calculus a Complete Course, Sixth Edition, Robert A. Adams, Pearson Addison Wesley, 2006



Recommended Literature

Calculus with Analytic Geometry, R.A. Silverman, Prentice Hall, 1985

Calculus, R.A. Adams, Addison Wesley Longman, 2003



ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

15

5

75

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

0

0

0

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

1

1

Final Examination (1 week)

1

1

1

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

15

15

Preparation for Final Examination

1

15

15

Assignment / Homework / Project

6

5

30

Seminar / Presentation

0

0

0

Total Workload

137

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

6



Course Code: PHY 104

Course Name: GENERAL PHYSICS

Level: Undergraduate

Year: I

Semester: II

ECTS Credits: 6

Status: Mandatory

Hours/Week: 3+2

Total Hours: 45+30

Course Description

This course offers modules of general physics which allows students to acquire practical and useful basic knowledge in this field. Topics include kinetics, dynamics, momentum of particles and rigid bodies, work and energy, gravitation, simple harmonic motion, and introduction to thermodynamics. Students will solve problems through example exercises. This is taken concurrently with a laboratory course.

Course Objectives

The cognitive, affective and behavioral objectives of this course are following:


  • Understand the basic principles in mechanics

  • Learn the basic principles in thermodynamics

  • Comprehend the basic principles in electromagnetism

  • Understand the basic principles in optics

  • Learn the basic principles in atomic and nuclear physics

  • Understand the importance of physics that are necessary for the further courses in the curriculum

Course Content

(weekly plan)



Week 1: Course Overview, Measurement, Vectors

Week 2: Motion along a Straight Line



Week 3: Force and Motion

Week 4: Kinetic Energy and Work. Potential Energy and Conservation Energy

Week 5: Fluids

Week 6: Temperature, Heat and the First Law of Thermodynamics. The Kinetic Theory of Gasses

Week 7: Sound

Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9: Coulomb's Law, Electric Fields

Week 10: Magnetic Fields

Week 11: Images

Week 12: Relativity, Photons, and Matter

Week 13: Atoms

Week 14: Nuclear Physics

Week 15: Overview



Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK
LABORATORY CONTENT

Lab 1: Measurement, Vectors

Lab 2: Motion along a Straight Line

Lab 3: Force and Motion

Lab 4: Kinetic Energy and Work. Potential Energy and Conservation Enegry

Lab 5: Fluids

Lab 6: Temperature, Heat and the First Law of Thermodynamics. The Kinetic Theory of Gasses

Lab 7: Sound



Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Lab 9: Coulomb's Law, Electric Fields

Lab 10: Magnetic Fields

Lab 11: Images

Lab 12: Relativity, Photons, and Matter

Lab 13: Atoms

Lab 14: Nuclear Physics

Lab 15: Overview



Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK

Teaching Methods

Description

  • Lectures

  • Practical Sessions

  • Exercises

  • Presentations




Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

20 %

Lab/Practical Exam

0 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

0 %

Attendance

10 %

Midterm Exam

20 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

10 %

Final Exam

40 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course, students should be able to:


  1. Understand the basic principles in mechanics and thermodynamics

  2. Comprehend the basic principles in electromagnetism and optics

  3. Learn the basic principles in atomic and nuclear physics

  4. Perceive physics as a crucial filed for the further development of genetics and bioengineering

  5. Understand the basic principle of physics that are crucial for the living organism

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


None

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

Halliday, D., Resnick, R., & Walker, J. (2014). Fundamentals of physics extended, 10th ed. John Wiley & Sons.

Recommended Literature

Giancoli, D.C. (2000). Physics for scientist and engineers. New Jersey, NJ, USA: Prentice Hall.

Bueche, F.J. & Hecht, E. (2008). Theory and problems of College Physics, 9th ed. McGraw-Hill Companies.



ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

15

3

45

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

2

30

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Final Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

15

15

Preparation for Final Examination

1

15

15

Assignment / Homework / Project




20

20

Seminar / Presentation




20

20

Total Workload

149

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

6



Course Code: GBE 105

Course Name: HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY

Level: Undergraduate

Year: I

Semester: II

ECTS Credits: 5

Status: Mandatory

Hours/Week: 2+2

Total Hours: 30+30

Course Description

This course provides a broad overview of cellular composition, their integration into tissues, all tissue type structures, their integration into organs. It provides students an introduction to tissue and organ structure and function. The first part of the course focuses on main tissue types: epidermis, connective tissue, muscle and nervous tissue. The second part of the course focus on major organ systems including: circulatory system, lymphoid system, digestive system, respiratory system, urogenital system, endocrine system, sensory system. The third part of the course focuses on the basics of human embryology and the development of a zygote into an entire organism.

Course Objectives

The cognitive, affective and behavioral objectives of this course are following:


  • Providing a theoretical and applied knowledge in the field of histology and embriology

  • Comprehending the cellular components of various tissue types

  • Understanding the metabolism of cells within various tissue

  • Learning normal normal tissue composition within various organs

  • Providing a basis for understanding pathological findings

  • Learning to recognize various tissue types and organs on histological slides

  • Providing basic embryological knowledge

Course Content

(weekly plan)



Week 1: Epithilium

Week 2: Connective tissue



Week 3: Nerve and muscle tissue

Week 4: Circulatory system, blood, hematopoiesis

Week 5: Immune system and lymphoid organs

Week 6: Digestive system

Week 7: Respiratory system

Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9: Skin

Week 10: Urinary system

Week 11: Endocrine system

Week 12: Male and female reproductive systems

Week 13: Sensory organs

Week 14: Introduction to embryology

Week 15: Development of major organ systems



Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK
LABORATORY CONTENT

Lab 1: Epithilium

Lab 2: Connective tissue

Lab 3: Nerve and muscle tissue

Lab 4: Circulatory system, blood, hematopoiesis

Lab 5: Immune system and lymphoid organs

Lab 6: Digestive system

Lab 7: Respiratory system



Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Lab 9: Skin

Lab 10: Urinary system

Lab 11: Endocrine system

Lab 12: Male and female reproductive systems

Lab 13: Sensory organs

Lab 14: Introduction to embryology

Lab 15: Overview



Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK

Teaching Methods

Description

  • Lectures

  • Practical Sessions

  • Exercises

  • Presentations




Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

0%

Lab/Practical Exam

20 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

20 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

20 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

40 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Understand the cellular composition of tissues

  2. Distinguish histological slides

  3. Know the basic cellular and tissue composition of organs

  4. Comprehend basics of embryological development from zygote to organism

  5. Learn basic concepts of various cell type functions and metabolism within tissues and organs

  6. Understand the integration of cells into tissues, organs and organ systems

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


None

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

Junqueira, L. C., & Carneiro, J. (2005). Basic histology text and atlas, 11th ed. London, UK: McGraw Hill.

Recommended Literature

Sadler, T. W. (2011). Langman's medical embryology, 12th ed. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

15

2

30

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

2

30

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Final Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

12

12

Preparation for Final Examination

1

15

15

Assignment / Homework / Project




18

18

Seminar / Presentation




18

18

Total Workload

127

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

5


Course Code: BOS 102

Course Name: BOSNIAN/CROATIAN/SERBIAN LANGUAGE II

Level: Undergraduate

Year: I

Semester: II

ECTS Credits: 2

Status: Elective

Hours/Week: 0+2

Total Hours: 0+30

Course Description

The Bosnian course adopts a multi-level methodology that integrates the skills of reading, writing, listening, grammar, vocabulary and conversation. These skills are reinforced at all levels and Bosnian is the only teaching language used in the class, except when it is necessary to facilitate the explanation of a grammar rule or lexical phrase to a beginner.

Course Objectives

The Bosnian Course seeks to develop in the students the basic linguistic skills, analytical skills, and cultural and literary knowledge which will enable them to appreciate the uniqueness of other cultures and to function in Bosnian speaking communities around the world.

Course Content

(weekly plan)



  • Three ways of forming present tense in Bosnian language and recognizing what way will be used with what verb; making simple sentences with verb in present tense

  • Collocations to express doubt, uncertainty or ignorance about something

  • Collocations to ask about the way and where to find something; adverbs left, right, straight, back; Genitive and some of its use (with prepositions iz, od, do)

  • Collocations about the Post office and Bank; Accusative and some of its use (object in sentence, with prepositions za, na)

  • Collocations about the weather; formal/informal communications; present tense of verb to have

  • Conversation in restaurant; meeting with Bosnian meals and names for different kind of food (fruit, vegetable, meat, other); present tense of verb to have

  • Present tense and use of verbs to buy, to sit, to tell; future tense compared with present tense

  • Conversation in clothing store; clothes and words related to it (colors, size...); imperative

  • Comparison of adjectives, phonetic rule jotovanje

  • Conversation about health and parts of body (with four-way cross-words)

Teaching Methods

Description

  • Interactive lectures

  • Discussions and group work

  • Project, Presentations




Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

0 %

Lab/Practical Exam

0 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

0 %

Attendance

30 %

Midterm Exam

30 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

40 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Understand Bosnian language

  2. Communicate in basic Bosnian language

  3. Appreciate and know a little about Bosnian culture.

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


Bosnian Language I

Language of Instruction

Bosnian and English

Mandatory Literature

Zenaida Karavdić, Bosnian language as a foreign language, IBU, Sarajevo 2010.

Bosanski jezik, Priručnik za strance, Minela Kerla, Nermina Alihodžić-Usejnovski,2013.



Recommended Literature

Ronelle Alexander, Ellen Elias-Bursac  Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian, a Textbook: With Exercises and Basic Grammar, University of Wisconsin Press, 2006

ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

14

2

28

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

0

0

0

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

1

1

Final Examination (1 week)

1

1

1

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

1

1

Preparation for Final Examination

1

1

1

Assignment / Homework / Project

14

1

1

Seminar / Presentation




4

4

Total Workload

50

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

2



Course Code: TDE 102

Course Name: TURKISH LANGUAGE II

Level: Undergraduate

Year: I

Semester: II

ECTS Credits: 2

Status: Elective

Hours/Week: 0+2

Total Hours: 0+30

Course Description

This is the second part of a two-part course series offered at the university. It builds upon the concepts that students acquired in the previous semester as the course covers basic grammatical rules and focuses on practicing everyday use of the language. Just like the first part of this series, this course is also offered to all students.

Course Objectives

The cognitive, affective and behavioral objectives of this course are following:


  • After completion of the course students will be able to speak, understand, read and write more advanced Turkish.

  • Enable the student to use Turkish in everyday life situations

Teaching Methods

Description

    • Interactive lectures and communication with students




Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

0 %

Lab/Practical Exam

0 %

Homework

10 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

20 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

20 %

Class Deliverables

10 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

40 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course, students should be able to:


  1. Start using Turkish language

  2. Be able to communicate in Turkish

  3. Read articles in Turkish

  4. Write articles in Turkish

  5. Grammar basics

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


Turkish Language I

Language of Instruction

Turkish

Mandatory Literature

Öztürk, T., et al. (2004). Gökkuşağı Türkçe Ders Kitabı 1. Cilt. Dilset Yayınları: İstanbul, Turkey.

Öztürk, T., et al. (2004). Gökkuşağı Türkçe Çalışma Kitabı 1.Cilt. Dilset Yayınları: İstanbul, Turkey.

Öztürk, T., et al. (2005). Gökkuşağı Türkçe Dilbigisi Kitabı 1. Cilt. Dilset Yayınları: İstanbul, Turkey



Öztürk, T., et al. (2005). Gökkuşağı Türkçe Ders Kitabı 2. Cilt. Dilset Yayınları: İstanbul, Turkey.

Öztürk, T., et al. (2005). Gökkuşağı Türkçe Çalışma Kitabı 2. Cilt. Dilset Yayınları: İstanbul, Turkey.



Öztürk, T., et al. (2005). Gökkuşağı Türkçe Dilbigisi Kitabı 2. Cilt. Dilset Yayınları: İstanbul, Turkey.

Recommended Literature




ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

0

0

0

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

2

30

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Final Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

2

2

Preparation for Final Examination

1

8

8

Assignment / Homework / Project




3

3

Seminar / Presentation




3

3

Total Workload

50

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

2


Course Code: GRM 102

Course Name: GERMAN LANGUAGE II

Level: Undergraduate

Year: 1

Semester: II

ECTS Credits: 2

Status: Elective

Hours/Week: 0+2

Total Hours: 0+30

Course Description

This is a continuation of Second Foreign Language I course. Interactive communication; grammatical structures and vocabulary commonly used in newspapers, magazines, extended dialogues, readings texts, and short stories; information about the culture of the target language through authentic materials.

Course Objectives

These courses emphasize the use of the target language for active communication. They have the following objectives:

  • the comprehension of formal and informal spoken language;

  • the acquisition of vocabulary and a grasp of language structure to allow for the accurate reading of newspaper and magazine articles as well as modern literature;

  • the ability to compose expository passages;

  • the ability to express ideas orally with accuracy and fluency. Students will also learn valuable test-taking strategies and self-evaluative skills.

Course Content

(weekly plan)



All Foreign courses improve grammar, speaking, listening and reading and writing skills. The highly-trained and experienced staff use a wide range of learning materials and methods, including audio-visual and ICT. All learners have an initial assessment and interview with a member of staff to establish their level of that particular foreign language. To ensure maximum progress, this is followed by an on-course diagnostic assessment to determine more precisely the specific language skills needed by each learner. The class tutor and learner then agree an individual learning plan to record the learner’s progress.

Teaching Methods

Description

(list up to 4 methods)




  • Interactive lectures and communication with students

  • Discussions and group work

  • Presentations (at least 1 per student per semester)

Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

0 %

Lab/Practical Exam

0 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

0 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

40 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

10 %

Final Exam

50 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

(please write 5-8 outcomes)



Upon successful completion of the courses in this discipline, the student will have acquired the following knowledge and skills:

  1. Demonstrate the confidence and listening/speaking skills necessary to participate successfully in spontaneous aural/oral exchanges with native speakers of those particular languages.

  2. Demonstrate reading comprehension of foreign language texts intended for developmental (or higher level) foreign language courses.

  3. Respond appropriately to written or spoken foreign language by writing paragraphs or short essays that communicate ideas clearly.

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


-

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

  • Schritte plus 2 Audio-CD zumArbeitsbuchmitinteraktivenÜbungen, Monika Bovermann, Daniela Niebisch, Franz Specht, Sylvette Penning-Hiemstra

  • Swick, Edward. The Everything Learning German Book: Speak, Write and Understand Basic German in No Time, Adams Media; 1st edition, 2003.

Recommended Literature

/


ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

0

0

0

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

2

30

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Final Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

2

2

Preparation for Final Examination

1

8

8

Assignment / Homework / Project




3

3

Seminar / Presentation




3

3

Total Workload

50

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

2


THIRD SEMESTER


Course Code: GBE 201

Course Name: GENETICS

Level: Undergraduate

Year: II

Semester: III

ECTS Credits: 6

Status: Mandatory

Hours/Week: 3+2

Total Hours: 45+30

Course Description

This course is an overall examination of the basic principles of genetics in eukaryotes and prokaryotes at the level of molecules, cells, as well as multicellular organisms, including Homo sapiens. Topics include Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance, structure and function of chromosomes and genomes, biological variation resulting from recombination, mutation, and selection, gene expression and environmental effects, and population genetics. This is taken concurrently with a laboratory course.

Course Objectives

The cognitive, affective and behavioral objectives of this course are following:


  • Helping students become familiar with the language of genetics.

  • Providing students with a strong background in the principles of Mendelian and non-Mendelian models of inheritance and enabling them to use this knowledge to track alleles through generations, to categorize and predict genotypes and phenotypes.

  • Explaining the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium equation and the requirements for maintaining Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in a population.

Course Content

(weekly plan)



Week 1: The cell cycle: Mitosis

Week 2: The cell cycle: Meiosis. Introduction to genetics vocabulary

Week 3: General aspects of Mendelian inheritance patterns. Monohybrid crosses

Week 4: Single gene inheritance

Week 5: Independent assortment of genes. Polygenic inheritance

Week 6: Extensions of Mendelian genetics

Week 7: Gene expression and environmental effects

Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9: Sex determination

Week 10: Pedigree analysis

Week 11: Gene position on chromosomes. Genetic mapping

Week 12: Extranuclear inheritance

Week 13: Developmental genetics

Week 14: Quantitative genetics

Week 15: Population genetics: Hardy-Weinberg law



Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK
LABORATORY CONTENT

Week 1: Beginning of classes

Week 2: Lab 1: Introduction

Week 3: Lab 2: Mitosis and meiosis: Problem solving

Week 4: Lab 3: Genetic crosses

Week 5: Lab 4: Genetic crosses

Week 6: Lab 5: Mendelian and non-Mendelian genetics

Week 7: Lab 6: Chi-square test



Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9: Lab 7: Improvement of micropipetting techniques

Week 10: Lab 8: Revision of solution preparation

Week 11: Lab 9: DNA isolation: Plasmid from bacterial cells (boiling method)

Week 12: Lab 10: DNA isolation: Plant sample (CTAB method)

Week 13: Lab 11: DNA isolation: Spider legs (Chelex method)

Week 14: Preparation for practical exam

Week 15: Practical exam from lab course



Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK

Teaching Methods

Description

  • Interactive lectures and communication with students

  • Discussions and group work

  • Presentations

  • Laboratory work




Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

0 %

Lab/Practical Exam

20 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

20 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

20 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

40 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course, students should be able to:


  1. Recall genetics terminology: homozygous, heterozygous, phenotype, genotype, homologous chromosome pair, etc.

  2. Manage Mendelian genetics calculations

  3. Assess non-Mendelian genetics

  4. Critically discuss extranuclear inheritance

  5. Interpret genetic mapping

  6. Predict the genotype of cells that undergo mitosis and meiosis

  7. Integrate concepts of genetic processes in plants and animals

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


Introduction to Genetics and Bioengineering and Cell Biology

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

Griffiths, A. J. F., Wessler, S. R., Carroll, S. B., & Doebley, J. (2010). Introduction to Genetic Analysis, 10th ed. New York, USA: W.H. Freeman

Recommended Literature

Klug, W., Cummings, M. R., Spencer, C., & Palladino M. A. (2011). Concepts of Genetics, 10th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ, USA: Prentice

ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

15

3

45

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

2

30

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Final Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

15

15

Preparation for Final Examination

1

15

15

Assignment / Homework / Project




20

20

Seminar / Presentation




20

20

Total Workload

149

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

6



Course Code: GBE 211

Course Name: ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I

Level: Undergraduate

Year: II

Semester: III

ECTS Credits: 4

Status: Mandatory

Hours/Week: 2+2

Total Hours: 30+30

Course Description

Organic chemistry with all different classes of compounds is presented through the main chemical reactions of each class of organic compounds. The course revolves around shared features and unifying concepts and it emphasizes principles that can be repeatedly applied. Learning on this way, students will see that organic chemistry is integral to biology as well as to their daily lives.


Course Objectives

The cognitive, affective and behavioral objectives of this course are following:


  • To introduce students to organic chemistry.

  • To teach about the application to scientific and commercial fields.

  • To understand the basics of organic chemistry needed for further studies.

  • To learn to use the nomenclature for organic compounds.

  • To learn the basic structures of organic molecules.

Course Content

(weekly plan)



Week 1: Introduction

Week 2: Electronic structure and covalent bonding

Week 3: Acids and bases

Week 4: Quiz I, Nomenclature, physical properties and structures of organic compounds

Week 5: Nomenclature, physical properties and structures of organic compounds

Week 6: Quiz II, Alkanes and cycloalkanes

Week 7: Alkenes and alkynes

Week 8: MIDTERM WEEK

Week 9: Isomers and physical properties

Week 10: Isomers and physical properties

Week 11: Quiz III, Delocalized electrons, UV/Vis Spectroscopy

Week 12: Benzene and its derivatives

Week 13: Substitution and elimination reactions of alkyl halides

Week 14: Quiz IV, Reactions of alcohols, amines and ether

Week 15: Carboxylic acids and their derivatives



Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK
Week 1: Beginning of classes

Week 2: Lab 1: Rules of behavior and safety measures

Week 3: Lab 2: Calculations in organic chemistry

Week 4: Lab 3: Acids and bases

Week 5: Lab 4: Alkanes

Week 6: Lab 5: Double bond: Alkenes and aromatic compounds

Week 7: Lab 6: Identification of hydrocarbons

Week 8: MIDTERM WEEK

Week 9: Lab 7: -OH group: Alcohols and phenols

Week 10: Lab 8: Identification of alcohols and phenols

Week 11: Lab 9: Carboxylic acids and esters

Week 12: Lab 10: Properties of carboxylic acids and esters

Week 13: Lab 11: Synthesis of benzoic acid from benzaldehyde



Week 14: Lab 12: Preparation of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin)

Week 15: Practical Exam from Lab Course

Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK

Teaching Methods

Description

  • Interactive lectures and communication with students

  • Discussions and group work

  • Presentations

  • Guest instructions

  • Laboratory work




Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

20 %

Lab/Practical Exam

20 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

0 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

20 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

40 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course, students should be able to:


  1. Interpret and use nomenclature of organic compounds

  2. Recall chemical reactions in organic chemistry

  3. Define and explain basic knowledge on alkanes, alkenes and alkynes

  4. Interpret and apply knowledge related to alcohols, ethers, epoxides

  5. Recognize the specific properties of benzene and its derivatives

  6. Design and manage a lab experiment in organic chemistry

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


General Chemistry

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

Bruice, P.Y. (2009). Essential organic chemistry, 2nd ed. New York City, NY, USA: Pearson Education

Recommended Literature

McMurry, J. (2012). Organic Chemistry, 8th ed. California, USA: Brooks/Cole.

ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

15

2

30

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

2

30

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Final Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

6

6

Preparation for Final Examination

1

7

7

Assignment / Homework / Project




12

12

Seminar / Presentation




12

12

Total Workload

101

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

4


Course Code: GBE 217

Course Name: MICROBIOLOGY

Level: Undergraduate

Year: II

Semester: III

ECTS Credits: 5

Status: Mandatory

Hours/Week: 2+2

Total Hours: 30+30

Course Description

This course is aimed at providing students with an introduction to microbiology. Students will become familiar with history and scope, microbial structure and function, nutrition, growth, control of microorganisms by physical and chemical agents, and the scientific, agronomic, pharmaceutical, and medical applications of microorganisms. Furthermore, students will gain a sound introduction to diversity of the microbial world, microbial taxonomy, proteobacteria, high and low GC gram-positives, and archaea. Furthermore, experimental design and manipulation with microorganisms, their analysis and applications will be covered. This is taken concurrently with a laboratory course.

Course Objectives

The cognitive, affective and behavioral objectives of this course are following:

  • Introduction to diversity of the microbial world,

  • Understand the basics of microbial taxonomy, proteobacteria, archaea.

  • Do experimental design and manipulation with microorganisms,

  • Conduct microbial analysis and understand their possible application.

Course Content

(weekly plan)



Week 1: History and development of microbiology

Week 2: Sterilization and disinfection, antibiotics

Week 3: Bacterial structure

Week 4: Genetics of bacteria

Week 5: Bacterial metabolism I

Week 6: Bacterial metabolism II

Week 7: Bacterial isolation and identification

Week 8: MIDTERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9: Methods in bacteriology

Week 10: Bacterial classification and basic families I

Week 11: Bacterial classification and basic families II

Week 12: Bacterial classification and basic families III

Week 13: Bacterial classification and basic families IV

Week 14: Basics of micology

Week 15: Basics of parasitology



Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK
LABORATORY CONTENT

Week 1, Beginning of classes

Week 2, Lab 1: Introduction and basic light microscopy

Week 3, Lab 2: Preparation of media

Week 4, Lab 3: Inocultaion techniques

Week 5, Lab 4: Gram staining and other staining procedures

Week 6, Lab 5: Biochemical tests, part 1

Week 7, Lab 6: Biochemical tests, part 2



Week 8: MIDTERM WEEK

Week 9, Lab 7: Colony morphology and different sample analysis

Week 10 Lab 8: Identification of bacteria with Bergey’s flowchart

Week 11, Lab 9: Normal flora

Week 12, Lab 10: Enterobacteriaceae, urine analysis

Week 13, Lab 11: Staphylococcaceae, throat swab analysis



Week 14, Preparation for practical exam

Week 15, Practical Exam from Lab Course

Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK

Teaching Methods

Description

  • Interactive lectures and communication with students

  • Discussions and group work

  • Presentations

  • Guest instructors

  • Research projects

  • Laboratory work




Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

0 %

Lab/Practical Exam

20 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

20 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

20 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

40 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Working knowledge of basic bacterial laboratory techniques, as well as to the foundations of Microbiology - the concepts of classification, evolution and growth of microorganisms, as well as a factual and laboratory knowledge of specific microorganism types.

  2. Understanding of microbial ecology and practical uses for microorganisms, as well as how they relate to basic biological concepts.

  3. Establish a firm foundation for future Microbiology courses and/or a good appreciation of concepts needed to make reasoned choices in their everyday lives.

  4. In general, they should understand how microorganisms survive where they do, how they are related, and how they interact with us.

  5. In the laboratory they should acquire basic bacteriological skills and should be able to successfully use them.

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


None

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

Willey, J., Sherwood L., &Woolverton C. (2008). Microbiology, 7th ed. New York City, NY, USA: McGraw-Hill Science.

Recommended Literature

Harvey R., Cornelissen C., & Fisher, B. (2012). Microbiology, 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA, USA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

15

2

30

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

2

30

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Final Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

12

18

Preparation for Final Examination

1

16

20

Assignment / Homework / Project




4

10

Seminar / Presentation




4

10

Total Workload

126

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

5



Course Code: GBE 219

Course Name: MOLECULAR BIOLOGY I

Level: Undergraduate

Year: II

Semester: III

ECTS Credits: 5

Status: Mandatory

Hours/Week: 2+2

Total Hours: 30+30

Course Description

Molecular Biology I offers students an introduction to the basic principles of DNA, RNA, and proteins, as well as transcription and translation. The course covers the topics on small molecules, macromolecules (structure, shape, and information), energy and biosynthesis, protein function, basic genetic mechanisms, recombinant DNA technology, and control of gene expression. At the end of the course, students are expected to understand the central dogma of molecular biology and to know its specificities in different forms of life: prokaryotes and eukaryotes. This is taken concurrently with a laboratory course, and it is the first part of the two-part molecular biology lecture series.

Course Objectives

The cognitive, affective and behavioral objectives of this course are following:


  • Making a detailed study on the structure and function of macromolecules.

  • Explaining the nature of the genetic material.

  • Giving an overview of the passage of information from gene to protein.

  • Explaining the regulation of gene expression.

  • Covering techniques of molecular biology.

Course Content

(weekly plan)



Week 1: Cells and genomes

Week 2: The chemical components of a cell

Week 3: The chemical components of a cell

Week 4: Energy, catalysis, biosynthesis

Week 5: Protein structure and function

Week 6: DNA and chromosomes

Week 7: DNA replication, repair and recombination

Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9: Homologous recombination

Week 10: Mutations problem solving

Week 11: From DNA to protein

Week 12: Transcription, translation, problem solving

Week 13: Control of gene expression

Week 14: How genes and genomes evolve

Week 15: Recombinant DNA technology



Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK
LABORATORY CONTENT

Week 1: Beginning of classes 

Week 2, Lab 1: General laboratory rules of behavior and safety considerations

Week 3, Lab 2: How to use a micropipette

Week 4, Lab 3: Introduction to spectrophotometry

Week 5, Lab 4: DNA isolation from banana using commercial detergent

Week 6, Lab 5: DNA isolation from buccal swab (salting-out method)

Week 7, Lab 6: Determining DNA concentration by quantitative spectrophotometric measurement



Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9, Lab 7: Agarose gel electrophoresis with Fast Blast stain

Week 10 Lab 8: DNA isolation from chicken liver (salting-out method)

Week 11, Lab 9: Restriction digestion of DNA fragments

Week 12, Lab 10: Agarose gel electrophoresis with SafeView Nucleic Acid stain

Week 13, Lab 11: Restriction mapping

Week 14: Preparation for practical exam

Week 15: Practical exam from lab course



Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK

Teaching Methods

Description

  • Interactive lectures and communication with students

  • Discussions and group work

  • Presentations

  • Laboratory work




Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

0 %

Lab/Practical Exam

20 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

20 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

20 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

40 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Recall the molecular structure of DNA/RNA and proteins

  2. Describe the basis of the central dogma of molecular biology

  3. Explain the molecular mechanisms underlying transcription and translation

  4. Illustrate the role of genes and proteins in normal functioning of the cell

  5. Examine the basic principles of molecular techniques

  6. Conduct isolation of DNA from various material

  7. Use spectrophotometry to determine the concentration and purity of DNA/RNA

  8. Conduct gel electrophoresis

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


General Biology

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

Alberts, B., Johnson, A., Lewis, J., Raff, M., Roberts, K., & Walter, P. (2007). Molecular biology of the cell, 5th ed. New York City, NY, USA: Garland Science


Recommended Literature

Wilson, J. H., & Hunt, T. (2007). Molecular biology of the cell, 5th ed. New York City, NY, USA: Garland Science

Watson, J. D., et al. (2007). Molecular biology of the gene, 6th ed. New York City, NY, USA: Pearson



Sambrook, J., & Russell, D. W. (2006). The condensed protocols from molecular cloning: A laboratory manual. Cold Spring Harbor, NY, USA: CSHL Press

ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

15

2

30

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

2

30

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Final Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

12

12

Preparation for Final Examination

1

13

13

Assignment / Homework / Project




18

18

Seminar / Presentation




18

18

Total Workload

125

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

5


Course Code: GBE 323

Course Name: BIOMEDICAL INSTRUMENTATION

Level: Undergraduate

Year: II

Semester: III

ECTS Credits: 5

Status: Mandatory

Hours/Week: 2+2

Total Hours: 30+30

Course Description

This course will introduce the students to basic biomedical engineering technology so that they can understand and evaluate (and perhaps design) systems and devices that can measure, test, and acquire biological information. The course will encompass systems of human physiology as well as the bio-signals they generate. The focus will also be on biosensors, transducers, bio-electrodes used for acquisition, and amplifiers for measuring bio-potentials. Some bioethics will be discussed as well. Introduction to fundamentals of biomedical instrumentation, biomedical sensors and physiological transducers, biomedical recorders, patient monitoring systems, arrhythmia and ambulatory monitoring instruments, cardiac pacemakers, cardiac defibrillators, MRI and CT systems are the topics covered within the course.

Course Objectives

The cognitive, affective and behavioral objectives of this course are following:


  • Introduction to basic biomedical instrumentation.

  • Explaining working principles of biomedical instrumentation.

  • Familiarizing students with patients’ security.

  • Giving an outline of regulations related to biomedical instrumentation.

Course Content

(weekly plan)



Week 1: Introduction to biomedical instrumentation

Week 2: Biomedical sensors and transducers and bioelectric amplifiers

Week 3: Electrocardiographs

Week 4: Blood pressure measurement and physiological pressure and other cardiovascular measurements and devices

Week 5: Instrumentation for measurement of brain parameters

Week 6: Biological impedance measurement

Week 7: Respiratory system and its measurement

Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9: Intensive and coronary care units and pacemakers and defibrillators

Week 10: Electrosurgery

Week 11: Lasers and medical imaging equipment

Week 12: Radiology and nuclear medicine equipment and medical ultrasound

Week 13: Magnetic resonance imaging

Week 14: Computed tomography imaging

Week 15: Patients’ security and law



Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK
LABORATORY CONTENT:

Week 1-11: This course is designed so that the students get acquainted with all the instruments mentioned in the lectures through a series of virtual labs. Through these labs they will learn how to handle the instruments and, at the same time, interpret the results they obtain.

Teaching Methods

Description

(list up to 4 methods)




  • Interactive lectures and communication with students,

  • Discussions and group work,

  • Consultation

  • Laboratory work

Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

0 %

Lab/Practical Exam

20 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

20 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

20 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

40 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

(please write 5-8 outcomes)



On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Recall basic terminology related to biomedical instrumentation

  2. Recognize biomedical instrumentation

  3. Practice on a huge area of biomedical instrumentation

  4. Interpret principles of work of biomedical instrumentation

  5. Evaluate patients' security and law

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


None

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

Raden, J.F. (2010). Handbook of Modern Sensors, Physics, Designs and Applications. New York, NY, USA: Springer-Verlag

Recommended Literature

Enderle, J. & Bronzino, J. (2011). Introduction to Biomedical Engineering,3rd ed. Burlington, MA, USA: Elsevier Academic Press

Webster, J.G. & Eren, H. (2014). Measurement, Instrumentation, and Sensors Handbook, 2nd ed. Boca Raton, FL, USA: CRC Press



ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

15

2

30

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

2

30

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Final Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

14

14

Preparation for Final Examination

1

15

15

Assignment / Homework / Project




14

14

Seminar / Presentation




18

18

Total Workload

125

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

5
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