Faculty of engineering and natural sciences department of genetics and bioengineering first cycle study program specification



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TABLE OF CONTENTS



1.PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 2

1.1. General 2

1.2. Vision 2

1.3. Mission 3

1.4. Program 3

1.5.Program Objectives and Outcomes 3

1.6. Practical Training 4

1.7. Learning and Teaching 4

1.8. Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies 4

1.9. Assessment Protocols 5

1.10.Assessment 5

1.11.Grading 5

1.12.Transferable Skills 6

1.13. Skills and Other Attributes 6

1.14.Methods for Evaluating and Improving the Quality and Standards of Teaching and Learning 6

1.15.Criteria for Admission 6

1.16. Career Prospects 7

2.CURRICULUM 8

  1. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    1. General



Genetics and bioengineering is one of the fastest growing disciplines in science today. The unique combination of traditional methods and approaches used in genetics combined with the innovative approaches of bioengineering enable a multidisciplinary approach to solving various biomedical, forensic, microbiological, engineering, and other related problems. The undergraduate program lasts three years and enables students to gain a wide overview of the field through the study of various fundamental courses like chemistry, physics and biology; bioengineering courses: genetics and bioengineering, biotechnology, molecular biology, etc.; as well as engineering subjects: programming, calculus etc., which give students the engineering basis necessary for the filed.
The Genetics and Bioengineering Department at International Burch University is located on the first floor in a separate part of the University facility. In order to avoid possible contamination the entire department is separated from the rest of the building with a glass door, which can only be accessed with an ID card. The Department has 4 laboratories: Scientific Research, Cell Biology and Microbiology, Genetics and Molecular Biology and Chemistry lab in which students pursue their laboratory exercises.
The main aim of the genetics and bioengineering undergraduate program at IBU is to prepare students for their future career through giving them the adequate knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to succeed. Each course is based on the principle that the knowledge gained on the lectures is followed by the practical application of that knowledge in the laboratory.
This field of study offers a wide range of employment opportunities in Bosnia and Herzegovina as well as the entire world. The main product of Higher Education Institution International Burch University, is a skilled and competent graduate ready for the labor market.
    1. Vision


With the establishment of the Department of Genetics and Bioengineering our goal was to create a branch that is dynamic, interdisciplinary, ethic, enterprising, open to original concepts, environmentalist, active in social points, high quality in science, and modern. The aim was to create a nurturing environment that will enable our students to gain the highest level of knowledge while creating relationships with faculty and colleagues that would prepare them for careers within the areas of interest. Program components combine flexibility with rigor, place a priority on independence and imagination, and emphasize extensive individual faculty-student interactions.
    1. Mission

The mission of the Department of Genetics and Bioengineering is to train the students to be the next generation of leaders in the globally competitive fields of life sciences, biotechnology, industry, academia, and research. The program is developed to meet the increasing demand of these fields in industry and research, respectively. Our aim is to enable students to become scientific professionals in fields such as biotechnology, bioinformatics, biomedical engineering, pharmacy and drug design, nanotechnology, genomic and proteomic research, neuroscience, and many more.



    1. Program

The Department of Genetics and Bioengineering offers three degrees: BSc undergraduate (three years), MSc (either one or two year program), and PhD (three years). Foundational course work in basic natural sciences, particularly in biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics, introduces the students to the fundamentals needed for their future studies of genetics and bioengineering. Since the entire program is in English during the first year of the bachelor degree students listen to the course which gives them advanced English reading and writing exercises (in both semesters). This course enables students to advance their knowledge of the English language which is necessary throughout the entire program. During the second and third year of the bachelor program candidates immerse themselves deeper into focused areas by predominantly attending genetic and bioengineering courses. The curriculum also entails elective courses that are designed to provide students with opportunities to begin establishing professional skills that are in line with their interests. Candidates that are enrolled in MSc and PhD programs attend more advanced courses in agricultural, medical, environmental, and practical biotechnologies while also conducting high quality research. They are expected to write and defend a thesis/dissertation at the completion of their studies.



    1. Program Objectives and Outcomes

The objectives of BSc program are as follows:



  • To produce graduates skilled in the fundamental theoretical and practical concepts of future graduate pursuits should they choose to do so.

  • To prepare graduates to pursue career choices in various genetics and bioengineering or related interdisciplinary fields that require a strong background in applied sciences or engineering.

  • To equip graduates with problem solving skills, laboratory skills, and design skills necessary to thrive in technical careers.

  • To develop students' abilities to communicate and demonstrate teamwork skills as well as an ethical demeanor necessary to succeed in their careers.

  • To prepare students to continue their professional development through continuing their educational endeavors and personal development experiences based on their awareness of database resources and professional societies, journals, and meetings.

Upon completion of this BSc Genetics and Bioengineering program, students should be able to:



  • Show a fundamental level of knowledge in the field of genetics and bioengineering as well as demonstrate knowledge in the fields of basic sciences and electives necessary for the bioengineering profession.

  • Interpret and discuss various different topics related to the field.

  • Apply computer programs and programming languages necessary to adequately perform tasks in the bioengineering field in a scientific manner through the development of computer literacy.

  • Develop a scientific approach to solving various scientific problems and tasks through the work on various laboratory experiments in the department as well as apply a fundamental level of skills needed to perform routine laboratory work.

  • Master the use of various bioengineering laboratory instruments and machines.

  • Collect, analyze and write the results of laboratory experiments and write laboratory reports.

  • Develop habits to work according to laboratory safety procedures and learn various bio-safety levels.

  • Develop team work skills, as well as skills to work in a multidisciplinary environment and bioethical and public policy awareness.

  • Learn to critically analyze laboratory protocols and compare various methodologies.
    1. Practical Training


Through the entire Bachelor program students have practical or laboratory sessions which follow the lectures. This enables students to get practical training in various scientific and engineering fields as well as develop skills necessary for their future career. As mentioned before, Burch possesses four well-equipped laboratories to meet all of the needs of the program. Students also gain additional training through visiting various laboratories throughout the course. Besides the regular laboratory sessions students also have to have an internship practice. This adds significant workplace experience to a student’s education. It is realized in the collaboration with public and private institutions based both nationally as well as internationally. With the duration of 30 working days, it enables the student to gain valuable “on the job,” “real-world” work experience related to a chosen focus in genetics and bioengineering. This practical training also permits students to establish networks in the areas of work in potential future careers.
    1. Learning and Teaching

Our learning and teaching methods provide high quality learning opportunities so that undergraduate and graduate candidates effectively demonstrate achievement in the courses and modules in their route of study.


We aim to foster the development of independent study skills, intellectual autonomy as well as a sense of curiosity while encouraging a commitment to lifelong learning and continuous professional development. Furthermore, students are urged to be independent in their course of study by taking on responsibility for their own learning and development. A progressive use of project learning, integrated assessment, and product/problem-based learning allow students to take on greater self-direction. Group as well as team work are of particular focus during the scholars’ course of study as they provide personal and enriching interactions that shape students both socially and intellectually.
Our courses are usually composed of lectures, seminars, tutorials, and practical laboratory sessions. The use of simulations, role play, case studies, projects, practical work, work-based learning, workshops, peer tutoring, peer group interaction, self-managed teams, and learner-managed learning are some of the means by which effective learning is encouraged.

    1. Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies



Lectures/classes: Lectures and classes offer information, literature reviews, illustrative applications and presentations that explore core ideas in the subject matter. Students are expected to solve problems that are discussed in small class set ups. Attending less than 70% of lectures will result in failing the course.
Practical sessions: Practical sessions enable students to develop a sense for real life scientific issues through regular laboratory participation. Each course is accompanied by a minimum of 10 laboratory sessions and attendance is mandatory for all students. Student performance is monitored and graded through laboratory quizzes and practical exams.
Group project: The group project provides an opportunity for students to solve real genetic, bioengineering, and biotechnological problems, practice analytic and problem-solving skills, and work in teams. It is this focus on knowing and doing, on individual achievement as well as meaningful collaborations that enable our students to reach their intellectual and academic potential.
Individual project: Individual projects involve literature reviews, problem specification and experiments/analyses. This enables a student to utilize theoretical techniques they have learned by applying them in laboratory and library settings.
Expert (guest) lectures and seminars: Guest lectures and seminars provide students with opportunities to hear internal as well as external visiting speakers. Through this immersion in real-world science, students are able to broaden their idea and understanding of the field and to potentially begin visualizing themselves in a science profession.
    1. Assessment Protocols

The purpose of an outcome-based learning assessment is to improve the quality of learning and teaching in genetics and bioengineering.

The fundamental principles are:


  • A student’s learning is the central focus of the Department‘s efforts.

  • Each student is unique and will express and experience learning in a unique way.

  • Students must be able to apply their learning beyond the classroom.

  • Students should become effective, independent, lifelong learners as a result of their educational experience.



    1. Assessment

Assessment of intellectual skills is done via:



  • Written examinations

  • Written essay assignments

  • Evaluation of practical work

  • Group project report and team presentation

  • Individual project report and short presentation.



    1. Grading

The final success of a student after all envisioned forms of testing is evaluated and graded through the system of comparison ECTS with the scale of grading, as follows:

a) 10 (A) – outstanding performance without errors or with minor errors, carries 95-100 points

b) 9 (B) – above average, with few errors, carries 85-94 points

c) 8 (C) – average, with notable errors, carries 75-84 points

d) 7 (D) – generally good, but with significant shortcomings, carries 65-74 points

e) 6 (E) – meets minimum criteria, carries 55-64 points

f) 5 (F, FX) – performance does not meet minimum criteria, less than 55 points.



    1. Transferable Skills

By the end of the course, a student will have developed a range of transferable skills including abilities in:



  • Managing their own learning and conducting independent thinking and study

  • Problem specification and modeling

  • Applying genetic and bioengineering methods to solve real-world problems

  • Managing a research project, including planning and time management

  • Conducting an engineering-based research-based work, from hypothesis to report writing

  • Working in a multi-disciplinary team

  • Critical analysis.



    1. Skills and Other Attributes





  • Effective communication of information, arguments, analyses and techniques in a variety of forms to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

  • An ability to undertake further training, develop existing skills, and acquire new competences that will enable students to assume significant responsibility within organizations.



    1. Methods for Evaluating and Improving the Quality and Standards of Teaching and Learning





  • Student focus groups and the annual student survey

  • Classroom observation of lecturers

  • Instructors possess advanced professional diplomas in teaching and learning in higher education

  • Membership of the higher education academy

  • External examiners reports

  • Accreditation visits

  • Curriculum area review

  • Course committees

  • Annual and periodic review.

Indicators of quality and standards:



  • Student feedback

  • Retention and success rates for each level for each course

  • Student module evaluations

  • Annual student questionnaires

  • First destination statistics

  • Professional accreditation

  • External examiner reports.
    1. Criteria for Admission

The Genetics and Bioengineering department at IBU invites applications from candidates whose breadth of knowledge and curiosity suggest a potential for academic excellence.


In general, only applicants with a distinguished academic record will be considered. Recommendations as well as a personal statement are carefully weighed as evidence for qualities we seek in our applicants. Those include evidence of personal skills, communication skills, literacy, numeracy, study skills, subject and motivation, and work experience as well as community involvement.
Students whose first language is not English are urged to apply, also. However, mastery of the English language is tested via standardized means such as IELTS as well as TOEFL.
    1. Career Prospects

Following completion of a degree, successful graduates, or Bachelors of Genetics and Bioengineering, work as researchers or administrators in various industries (genetic diagnosis and medication, chemical, pharmaceutical, food, etc.), spanning across a wide range of disciplines within biological sciences and biotechnology.



  1. CURRICULUM





First Semester

CODE

COURSE NAME

T

P

ECTS

GBE 101

Introduction to Genetics and Bioengineering

2

2

5

GBE 103

General Biology

3

2

6

MTH 101

Calculus I

3

2

6

CEN 111

Programming I

3

2

6

ELT 117

Advanced Reading and Vocabulary I

2

2

5

XXX xxx

Elective (Language)1

0

2

2

Total

13

12

30

Second Semester

CODE

COURSE NAME

T

P

ECTS

GBE 102

Cell Biology

2

2

5

GBE 108

General Chemistry

3

2

6

MTH 102

Calculus II

3

2

6

PHY 104

General Physics

3

2

6

GBE 105

Histology and Embryology

2

2

5

XXX xxx

Elective (Language)2

0

2

2

Total

13

12

30

Third Semester

CODE

COURSE NAME

T

P

ECTS

GBE 201

Genetics

3

2

6

GBE 211

Organic Chemistry I

2

2

4

GBE 217

Microbiology

2

2

5

GBE 219

Molecular Biology I

2

2

5

GBE 323

Biomedical Instrumentation

2

2

5

GBE xxx

Technical Elective I

2

2

5

Total




13

12

30

Fourth Semester

CODE

COURSE NAME

T

P

ECTS

GBE 202

Biostatistics

2

2

4

GBE 206

Molecular Biology II

2

2

5

GBE 210

Biochemistry

3

2

6

GBE 330

Biosensors

2

2

5

GBE xxx

Technical Elective II

2

2

5

GBE xxx

Technical Elective III

2

2

5

 Total

13

12

30

Fifth Semester

CODE

COURSE NAME

T

P

ECTS

GBE 303

Internship

0

4

5

GBE 307

Bioinformatics

2

2

5

GBE 309

Human Genetics

2

2

5

GBE 325

Biomedical Signals and Systems

2

2

5

GBE xxx

Technical Elective IV

2

2

5

GBE xxx

Technical Elective V

2

2

5

Total



10

14

30

Sixth Semester

CODE

COURSE NAME

T

P

ECTS

GBE 392

Genetics and Bioengineering Project

0

4

5

GBE 304

Forensic Genetics

2

2

5

GBE 321

Intelligent Systems

2

2

5

GBE 338

Immunology and Immunogenetics

2

2

5

GBE xxx

Technical Elective VI

2

2

5

GBE xxx

Technical Elective VII

2

2

5

Total

10

14

30



Technical Elective Courses

CODE

COURSE NAME

T

P

ECTS

GBE 320

Systems Physiology

2

2

5

GBE 322

Principles of Neurobiology

2

2

5

GBE 324

Biomaterials

2

2

5

GBE 326

Cytogenetics

2

2

5

GBE 327

General Biotechnology and Biosafety

2

2

5

GBE 328

Introduction to Research Methods

2

2

5

GBE 329

Population Genetics

2

2

5

GBE 331

Environmental Biology

2

2

5

GBE 332

Plant Stress Physiology

2

2

5

GBE 333

Plant Physiology and Tissue Culture

2

2

5

GBE 334

Analytical Chemistry

2

2

5

GBE 335

Genomics and Proteomics

2

2

5

GBE 337

Biomechanics

2

2

5

GBE 339

Recombinant DNA Technology

2

2

5

GBE 340

Plant Pathology

2

2

5

GBE 341

Biophysics

2

2

5

GBE 342

Organic Chemistry II

2

2

5

GBE 343

Virology

2

2

5

Non-Technical Elective Courses

COURSE NAME

COURSE NAME

T

P

ECTS

BOS 101

Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian Language I

0

2

2

TDE 101

Turkish Language I

0

2

2

GRM 101

German Language I

0

2

2

BOS 102

Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian Language II

0

2

2

TDE 102

Turkish Language II

0

2

2

GRM 102

German Language II

0

2

2


FIRST SEMESTER


Course Code: GBE 101

Course Name: INTRODUCTION TO GENETICS AND BIOENGINEERING

Level: Undergraduate

Year: I

Semester: I

ECTS Credits: 5

Status: Mandatory

Hours/Week: 2+2

Total Hours: 30+30

Course Description

The course covers basic concepts of genetics and bioengineering and their connection with the spectrum of human activity. It serves as an introduction to the fundamental science and engineering on which genetics and bioengineering are based upon. Various topics within the realms of genetics and bioengineering are covered, and it is designed for students who are in their first year of genetics and bioengineering studies. Upon completion of the course, students will be familiar with the general history of the field of biotechnology, including a basic knowledge of the important researchers within the field and their major contributions and discoveries. They will also be familiar with the basics of classical genetics and will understand the role of DNA in inheritance. The course is taken concurrently with a laboratory course.

Course Objectives

The cognitive, affective and behavioral objectives of this course are following:


  • Giving students general knowledge about the field of bioengineering.

  • Introduction to the history and applications of DNA/RNA technology, molecular biology and bioethics.

  • Enabling students to analyze situations or phenomena related to the biological world in a bioethical perspective.

  • Teaching students to conduct all experiments in a safe environment by introducing them to the basics of lab safety.

  • Illustrating how to apply bioengineering in the laboratory environment.

  • Introduction to experiment designing, result recording and result displaying.

Course Content

(weekly plan)



Week 1: An introduction to genetics (definition and history)

Week 2: Genes and genomes

Week 3: Theory of operon

Week 4: Definitions and levels of genetic engineering

Week 5: Recombinant DNA technology and genomics

Week 6: Basics of biotechnology

Week 7: Microbial, plant, and animal biotechnology

Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9: Bioreactors

Week 10: Definition and usage of various genetic markers

Week 11: Introduction to GMO

Week 12: Introduction to gene therapy

Week 13: Introduction to cloning

Week 14: Introduction to various molecular genetic techniques (DNA extraction, PCR, DNA sequencing, etc.)

Week 15: Introduction to various molecular genetic techniques (DNA extraction, PCR, DNA sequencing, etc.)



Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK
LABORATORY CONTENT:

Week 1-11: The laboratory exercises will be based on the principle of designing an experiment and following the results through the entire course. Since the main aim of this course is to introduce students to genetics and bioengineering, through this lab, students will learn how to pose a hypothesis, how to create an experiment, measure and report the results, and display them adequately. This exercise will aid student in learning how to write a laboratory report which they will encounter through the entire program.

Teaching Methods

Description

  • Interactive lectures and communication with students

  • Discussions and group work

  • Presentations

  • Laboratory work




Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

0 %

Lab/Practical Exam

20 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

20 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

20 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

40 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course, students should be able to:


  1. Recall the basics of genetics and bioengineering

  2. Describe and discuss the principles of biotechnology: bacteria, animal and plants

  3. Explain genome organization

  4. Illustrate the use of genetic markers and gene cloning

  5. Differentiate and explain methodologies used in bioengineering

  6. Propose how to apply bioengineering in different fields

  7. Practice laboratory work in a safe environment

  8. Organize and manage an experiment and report on the results

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


None

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

Nair, A. J. (2010). Introduction to Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, 1st ed. Sudbury, MA, USA: Infinity Science Press


Recommended Literature

Brandenberg O., et al. (2011). Introduction to Molecular Biology and Genetic Engineering. Roma, Italy: FAO

Current scientific literature and recent research papers



ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

15

2

30

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

2

30

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Final Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

14

14

Preparation for Final Examination

1

15

15

Assignment / Homework / Project




18

18

Seminar / Presentation




18

18

Total Workload

129

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

5




Course Code: GBE 103

Course Name: GENERAL BIOLOGY

Level: Undergraduate

Year: I

Semester: I

ECTS Credits: 6

Status: Mandatory

Hours/Week: 3+2

Total Hours: 45+30

Course Description

This course is designed to cover the basics of biology that are needed for future studies of genetics and bioengineering. Model organisms are usually used to study genetics, which is why students will have an opportunity to learn about living organisms, as well as how to implement this knowledge in future studies. The course will begin by introducing the structures of macromolecules, the basic concepts of the cell, cell organelles, metabolism, cell cycle, inheritance and the flow of genetic information, followed by binominal classification systems and various groups of organisms, such as bacteria, algae, fungi, Plantae and Animalia. This is taken concurrently with a laboratory course.

Course Objectives

The cognitive, affective and behavioral objectives of this course are following:


  • Giving students an overview of the living world and briefly introducing them to the basic groups of living organisms.

  • Explaining the basic structure and function of cells as the basic units of all living things and as the building blocks of multicellular organisms.

  • Teaching students the basics of metabolism, photosynthesis, cell cycle and the basics of inheritance.

  • Introduction to the concept of biodiversity and bioethics.

  • Teaching students to use the binominal classification system which is needed throughout the study.

  • Teaching students to identify different species of bacteria, algae, fungi, plantae and animalia through microscopic, macroscopic studies and field trips.

  • Explaining the interactions between organisms and their environments, and the consequences of these interactions in natural populations, communities, and ecosystems.

Course Content

(weekly plan)



Week 1: Introduction to general biology and molecular diversity of life

Week 2: The structure and function of macromolecules - carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, nucleic acids

Week 3: The cell and cellular organelles

Week 4: Cellular respiration

Week 5: Photosynthesis: Chloroplast structure and function, photosynthetic pigments, photosystems, excitation of chlorophyll by light, cyclic and noncyclic electron flows

Week 6: Cell communication. Cell cycle and mitosis.

Week 7: Meiosis and sexual life cycles. Mendel and the gene idea, genotype and phenotype

Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9: Chromosomal and molecular basis of inheritance

Week 10: Genes. From gene to protein - the flow of genetic information

Week 11: Binominal classification system. Woes and Whittaker classification

Week 12: Bacteria, fungi, and Plantae

Week 13: Animalia (achordates and chordates)

Week 14: Introduction to ecology

Week 15: Introduction to evolution



Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK
LABORATORY CONTENT

Week 1: Beginning of classes

Week 2: Lab 1: Introduction to general biology labs and binominal classification

Week 3: Lab 2: Microscopy

Week 4: Lab 3: Bacteria

Week 5: Lab 4: Algae

Week 6: Lab 5: Fungi

Week 7: Lab 6: Plantae (classification and species determination)



Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9: Lab 7: Plantae (field trip; Braun-Blanquet method and species determination)

Week 10: Lab 8: Animalia (Protista microscopy)

Week 11: Lab 9: Animalia (Arthropoda examination)

Week 12: Lab 10: Animalia (fish dissection)

Week 13: Preparation for practical exam



Week 14: Practical exam from lab course

Week 15: FINAL EXAM WEEK

Teaching Methods

Description

  • Interactive lectures and communication with students

  • Discussions and group work

  • Presentations

  • Laboratory work




Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

0 %

Lab/Practical Exam

20 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

20 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

20 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

40 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course, students should be able to:


  1. Discriminate the basic concepts of the cell and metabolism

  2. Explain the basic concepts of the cell cycle

  3. Summarize main kingdoms and their characteristics

  4. Use the binominal classification system

  5. Plan species determination

  6. Perform basic microscopy needed for species determination

  7. Practice classification keys

  8. Develop basic laboratory techniques appropriate for the field of biology

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


None

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

Campbell A.N., & Reece J. (2013). Biology, 10th ed. Cambridge, UK: Pearson Publishing

Recommended Literature

Starr, C., Taggart, R., Evers, C., & Starr, L. (2008). Biology: The Unity and Diversity of Life, 12th ed. Andover, Hampshire, UK: Cengage Learning

ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

15

3

45

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

2

30

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Final Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

15

15

Preparation for Final Examination

1

20

20

Assignment / Homework / Project




20

20

Seminar / Presentation




20

20

Total Workload

154

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

6



Course Code: MTH 101

Course Name: CALCULUS I

Level: Undergraduate

Year: I

Semester: I

ECTS Credits: 6

Status: Mandatory

Hours/Week: 3+2

Total Hours: 45+30

Course Description

Use of calculus is widespread in science, engineering, medicine, business, industry, and many other fields. Calculus also provides important tools in understanding functions and has led to the development of new areas of mathematics including real and complex analysis, topology, and non-Euclidean geometry.

Course Objectives

1-To expand understanding of mathematical topics that may have been previously studied.

2-To introduce and explore topics that possibly have not been part of the student’s mathematical experience.

3-To develop an appreciation for the development of mathematical thought.

4-To learn the application of mathematics in real life problems and analyzing the results.



Course Content

(weekly plan)



01-Preliminaries: Functions and graphs

02-Preliminaries: Inverse functions and trigonometric functions

03-Limits and Continuity: Limits, limits involving infinity

04-Limits and Continuity: Continuity and tangent lines

05-Derivatives: Rate of change

06-Derivatives: Derivative rules and properties

07-Derivatives: Chain rule & implicit derivative.

08-Application of Derivatives: Extreme values, mean value theorem



09-MIDTERM

10-Application of Derivatives: Concavity and Curve Sketching

11-Application of Derivatives: Indeterminate forms and L’Hospital rule

12-Integration: Estimating with finite sums, Riemann sum, the definite integral

13-Integration: The fundamental theorem of calculus

14-Integrals and transcendental functions

15-Improper Integrals

16-FINAL


Teaching Methods

Description

1-Lectures

2-Recitation

3-Problem solving

4-Exercises



Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

25 %

Lab/Practical Exam

0 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

0 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

25 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

50 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of the course, the students should be able to:

01-recognise properties of functions and their inverses

02-recall and use properties of polynomials, rational, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions

03-understand the terms domain and range

04-sketch graphs, using function, its first derivative, and the second derivative

05-use the algebra of limits, and l’Hôpital’s rule to determine limits of simple expressions

06-apply the procedures of differentiation accurately, including implicit and logarithmic differentiation

07-apply the differentiation procedures to solve related rates and extreme value problems

08-obtain the linear approximations of functions and to approximate the values of functions

09-perform accurately definite and indefinite integration, using parts, substitution, inverse substitution

10-understand and apply the procedures for integrating rational functions

11-perform accurately improper integrals

12-calculate the volumes of solid objects, the length of arcs and the surface area

13-perform polar to rectangular and rectangular to polar conversions



Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


None

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

Thomas's Calculus, Eleventh Edition, George B. Thomas, Pearson International Edition, 2005

Calculus a Complete Course, Sixth Edition, Robert A. Adams, Pearson Addison Wesley, 2006



Recommended Literature

Calculus with Analytic Geometry, R.A. Silverman, Prentice Hall, 1985

Calculus, R.A. Adams, Addison Wesley Longman, 2003



ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

15

5

75

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

0

0

0

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

1

1

Final Examination (1 week)

1

1

1

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

15

15

Preparation for Final Examination

1

15

15

Assignment / Homework / Project

6

5

30

Seminar / Presentation

0

0

0

Total Workload

137

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

6



Course code: CEN 111

Course Name: PROGRAMMING I

Level: Undergraduate

Year: I

Semester: I

ECTS Credits: 6

Status: Mandatory

Hours/Week: 3+2

Total Hours: 45+30

Course Description

The course provides basic computer literacy and understanding of algorithms and programming concepts necessary for the realm of engineering. Topics that will be covered include algorithms, data types, constants, variables, sequences as well as searching and sorting abstract data types, structures, pointers and strings. Students will perform exercises in programming languages such as C, and will be graded both on the correctness of their solutions and the design choices they make in developing their programs.

Course Objectives

The cognitive, affective and behavioral objectives of this course are following:

  • To introduce structured programming concept.

  • To explain programming constructs such as sequential structures, selection structures, and repetition structures.

  • To introduce programming with C languages, variables, if-then-else, loop structures: for/while/do-while, break/ continue/ switch statements, flow chart solutions, arrays are covered.

  • To explain the importance and usefulness of programming in genetics and bioengineering.

  • To develop a basic understanding of programming concepts and using these programming concepts in C language.

Course Content

(weekly plan)



Week 1: Introduction

Week 2: Basic computer literacy.

Week 3: Fundamentals of computer programming.

Week 4: Algorithm development and problem solving using flowcharts and pseudocodes.

Week 5: Data types.

Week 6: Constants.

Week 7: Variables.

Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9: Basic input/output.

Week 10: Sequences.

Week 11: Selection and repetition structures.

Week 12: Functions and arrays.

Week 13: Searching and sorting, abstract data types, structures, pointers, strings, input/output and file processing.

Week 14: Searching and sorting, abstract data types, structures, pointers, strings, input/output and file processing.

Week 15: Preparation for final exam



Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK
LABORATORY CONTENT

Week 1-11: Exercising the use of programming language C


Teaching Methods

Description

  • Interactive lectures and communication with students

  • Discussions and group work

  • Consultations

  • Laboratory work




Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

15 %

Lab/Practical Exam

0 %

Homework

15 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

0 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

20 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

50 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Fundamental aspects of the theories, principles and practice of computing

  2. Knowledge of the underlying concepts and principles associated with computing and supporting technologies, and the ability to evaluate and interpret these within the context of various areas of application;

  3. The necessity of programming in the field of genetics and bioengineering

  4. Application of theory, techniques, and relevant tools to the specification, analysis, design, implementation, and testing of a simple computing product;

  5. Evaluation basic theories, processes, and outcomes of computing

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


None

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

Kleinberg, J., Tardos, E. (2005). Algorithm Design. Addison-Wesley: Boston, MA, USA.

Recommended Literature

Deitel, P., Deitel, H. (2012). C: How to Program, 7th ed. Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, NJ, USA.

ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

15

3

45

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

2

30

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Final Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

15

15

Preparation for Final Examination

1

20

20

Assignment / Homework / Project




20

20

Seminar / Presentation




20

20

Total Workload

154

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

6



Course Code : ELT 117

Course Name: Advanced Reading and Vocabulary I

Level : Undergraduate

Year : I

Semester : I

ECTS Credits : 5

Status : Compulsory

Hours/Week : 2+2

Total Hours : 30+30

Course Description

This course presents a wide range of authentic reading materials including newspapers, journals, reviews and academic texts in order to comprehend contrasting viewpoints and to predict and identify main ideas and to decode hidden clues. It also aims to equip students with intensive and extensive reading habits. Critical thinking skills such as synthesizing information or analyzing a problem as well as reacting on the basis of evaluation are fostered. Such sub-skills of reading are employed by students in their short writings on the topic. Students are expected to improve their ability to communicate the information and concepts from course reading materials continually and to improve and expand their vocabulary significantly.

Course Objectives

Students will be able to read and comprehend different types of texts. They will have also learned to acquire new vocabulary on their own and thus to improve their reading and writing skills. In addition to the integration of reading with writing, research-based instruction will be adopted, so that students will develop basic research skills including library or internet search.

Course Content

(weekly plan)



  • 1st TOPIC Home and the homeless - Home and Travel

  • Helping and Hating the Homeless; At home

  • 2nd TOPIC: HEALTH Divided Sleep, Long life, Health and medicine

  • 3rd TOPIC: History The Robber Barons, The Politics of Progressivism

  • Message to Wall Street

  • 4th TOPIC: CLOTHING The Necktie; A Young Man and his Kilt

  • 5th TOPIC: FILM STUDIES One Hundred Years of Cinema

  • Mid-term exam

  • A Conversation with Leo Tolstoy on Film; An Interview with James Cameron

  • 6th TOPIC: MEDIA STUDY Mind Control and the Internet

  • The press and the media; The Use of Social Media in the Arab Spring

  • 7th TOPIC: GREAT MINDS The Right-Brain, Left-Brain Controversy

  • Artists as Scientists and Entrepreneurs

  • 8th TOPIC: THE BRAIN AND MEMORY In Search of Memory

  • The Brain and Human Memory Music and the Brain;

  • 9TH TOPIC: LEISURE The Art of Paintball

  • Final exam

Teaching Methods

Description

(list up to 4 methods)




  • Reading passages in the classroom.

  • Comprehension studies on what is read.

  • Vocabulary exercises by topic and short writing assignments on that topic (both in-class and homework assignments).




Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

0 %

Lab/Practical Exam

0 %

Homework

10 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

10 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

30 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

50 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

(please write 5-8 outcomes)



After completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Read a variety of texts by using a range of strategies, including decoding and guessing meaning in unfamiliar texts

  2. Analyze extensive reading materials with sufficient comprehension to explain and discuss critical-thinking elements such as author tone, viewpoint, purpose, presumptions and underlying beliefs, character motivations, text connections to students’ personal lives, and logical evaluation of text arguments

  3. Recognize sentence and paragraph structures

  4. Make logical inferences based on materials read and explain them orally and in writing.

  5. Acquire sufficient college-level vocabulary to comprehend the texts and use this vocabulary in student writing and speaking assignments.

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)





Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

  • Rober F. Cohen and Judy L. Miller. Longman Academic Reading Series 4: Reading Skills for College (LARS). Pearson Education. 2014. (Chapters 1-5)

  • Fellag Linda Robinson. From Reading to Writing Level 3. Pearson Education (FRTW). 2010. (Units 1-4)

  • Michael McCarthy and Felicity O’Dell. English Vocabulary in Use. Cambridge University Press (EVIU). 2001

Recommended Literature

  • Mikulecky Beatrice S, and Jeffries Linda. Reading Power Series, Pearson ESL, March 2007.



ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

15

2

30

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

2

30

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Final Examination (1 week)

1

3

3

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

10

10

Preparation for Final Examination

1

20

20

Assignment / Homework / Project




30

30

Seminar / Presentation










Total Workload

125

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

5



Course Code: BOS 101

Course Name: BOSNIAN/CROATIAN/SERBIAN LANGUAGE I

Level: Undergraduate

Year: I

Semester: I

ECTS Credits: 2

Status: Elective

Hours/Week: 0+2

Total Hours: 0+30

Course Description

The purpose of this course is to teach Bosnian language basics at the beginner level.

Course Objectives

Highly personalized course designed to improve knowledge of Bosnian language and communication and language skills. The objective is to achieve the level of language that would create confidence to communicate in Bosnian with clients, suppliers and colleagues.

Course Content

(weekly plan)



  • Learn how to say „Hello“ and acquaint; the classes of nouns (muški, ženski, srednji rod)

  • Personal pronouns (in the first case), introducing oneself: I'm from ...; practicing personal pronouns by answering the questions Where are you from? Where is he/she from? Where are they from? Introducing verb to be by questions: Are you from...? Is he from...?

  • Present tense of verb to be (positive, negative and question form); Answering the question „What's your job?“; learning some of names of different jobs and male and female form for that kind of nouns

  • Terminology about the faculty, exercise with cross-words; numbers 1-10 with little short song about the numbers; first information about plural

  • Numbers 11-10.000; speaking exercise about numbers by phone number, prices; demonstrative pronouns

  • Introducing the collocations about the speaker's attitude about the contents of sentence and speaking on the scale from extremely kind to extremely unkind; declarative, interrogative and exclamatory sentences

  • Place and sort of accent in Bosnian words; filling out the forms with basic information (name, surname, date and place of birth...)

  • Introducing the question-word (what, where, when...); ordinal numbers and classes of adjectives (muški, ženski, srednji rod)

  • Answering on questions What date is...? When it happened? and exercise for ordinal numbers

  • SVO order in Bosnian language, order in declarative and interrogative sentences

Teaching Methods

Description

  • Interactive lectures and communications with students

  • Discussions and group works

  • Presentations

Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

0 %

Lab/Practical Exam

0 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

0 %

Attendance

30 %

Midterm Exam

30 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

40 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Speak Bosnian with confidence

  2. Interact more confidently when visiting a Bosnian-speaking region or dealing with Bosnian speakers

  3. Build rapport and strengthen relationships with Bosnian-speaking colleagues and clients through a show of interest in the Bosnian language and culture

  4. Demonstrate goodwill and facilitate international communication at both a personal and organizational level.

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


None

Language of Instruction

Bosnian and English

Mandatory Literature

Zenaida Karavdić, Bosnian language as a foreign language, IBU, Sarajevo 2010.

Bosanski jezik, Priručnik za strance, Minela Kerla, Nermina Alihodžić-Usejnovski,2013.



Recommended Literature

Ronelle Alexander, Ellen Elias-Bursac  Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian, a Textbook: With Exercises and Basic Grammar, University of Wisconsin Press, 2006

ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

14

2

28

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

0

0

0

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

1

1

Final Examination (1 week)

1

1

1

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

1

1

Preparation for Final Examination

1

1

8

1

14

1

14

Seminar / Presentation

1

4

4

Total Workload

50

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

2


Course Code: TDE 101

Course Name: TURKISH LANGUAGE I

Level: Undergraduate

Year: I

Semester: I

ECTS Credits: 2

Status: Elective

Hours/Week: 0+2

Total Hours: 0+30

Course Description

This course is offered to all students entering their first year of genetics and bioengineering studies. It is taught in Turkish, and it covers basic grammatical rules and focuses on practicing everyday use of the language. This is the first part of a two-part series that is taught during the first year. The second part will be taught in the following semester.

Course Objectives

The cognitive, affective and behavioral objectives of this course are following:

  • To learn Vocabulary and Grammar.

  • To use Turkish in everyday life.

  • To speak, understand, read and write basic Turkish

Teaching Methods

Description

  • Interactive lectures and communication with students.

  • Discussions and group work.

Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

10 %

Lab/Practical Exam

0 %

Homework

10 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

20 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

20 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

40 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Basic vocabulary and grammar

  2. Communication in Turkish

  3. Reading articles in Turkish

  4. Writing articles in Turkish

  5. Use of Turkish in everyday life situations

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


None

Language of Instruction

Turkish

Mandatory Literature

Lewis, G. (2001). Turkish Grammar. Oxford University Press: Oxford, UK.


Recommended Literature

Dogan, B. O., Wilman, A. (2007). Starting Turkish. Milet Publishing: London, UK.

ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

0

0

0

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

2

30

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Final Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

2

2

Preparation for Final Examination

1

8

8

Assignment / Homework / Project




3

3

Seminar / Presentation




3

3

Total Workload

50

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

2


Course Code: GRM 101

Course Name: GERMAN LANGUAGE I

Level: Undergraduate

Year: 1

Semester: I

ECTS Credits: 2

Status: Elective

Hours/Week: 0+2

Total Hours: 0+30

Course Description

Basic communication; structures and vocabulary necessary to comprehend simple daily conversational dialogues and reading texts, and to engage in daily simple communication; information about the culture of the target language.

Course Objectives

These courses emphasize the use of the target language for active communication. They have the following objectives:

  • the comprehension of formal and informal spoken language;

  • the acquisition of vocabulary and a grasp of language structure to allow for the accurate reading of newspaper and magazine articles as well as modern literature;

  • the ability to compose expository passages;

  • the ability to express ideas orally with accuracy and fluency. Students will also learn valuable test-taking strategies and self-evaluative skills.

Course Content

(weekly plan)



All Foreign courses improve grammar, speaking, listening and reading and writing skills. The highly-trained and experienced staff use a wide range of learning materials and methods, including audio-visual and ICT. All learners have an initial assessment and interview with a member of staff to establish their level of that particular foreign language. To ensure maximum progress, this is followed by an on-course diagnostic assessment to determine more precisely the specific language skills needed by each learner. The class tutor and learner then agree an individual learning plan to record the learner’s progress.

Teaching Methods

Description

(list up to 4 methods)




  • Interactive lectures and communication with students

  • Discussions and group work

  • Presentations (at least 1 per student per semester)

Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

0 %

Lab/Practical Exam

0 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

0 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

40 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

10 %

Final Exam

50 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

(please write 5-8 outcomes)



Upon successful completion of the courses in this discipline, the student will have acquired the following knowledge and skills:

  1. Demonstrate the confidence and listening/speaking skills necessary to participate successfully in spontaneous aural/oral exchanges with native speakers of those particular languages.

  2. Demonstrate reading comprehension of foreign language texts intended for developmental (or higher level) foreign language courses.

  3. Respond appropriately to written or spoken foreign language by writing paragraphs or short essays that communicate ideas clearly.

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


-

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

  • Schritte plus 2 Audio-CD zumArbeitsbuchmitinteraktivenÜbungen, Monika Bovermann, Daniela Niebisch, Franz Specht, Sylvette Penning-Hiemstra

  • Swick, Edward. The Everything Learning German Book: Speak, Write and Understand Basic German in No Time, Adams Media; 1st edition, 2003.

Recommended Literature

/

ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

0

0

0

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

2

30

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Final Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

2

2

Preparation for Final Examination

1

8

8

Assignment / Homework / Project




3

3

Seminar / Presentation




3

3

Total Workload

50

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

2


SECOND SEMESTER


Course Code: GBE 102

Course Name: CELL BIOLOGY

Level: Undergraduate

Year: I

Semester: II

ECTS Credits: 5

Status: Mandatory

Hours/Week: 2+2

Total Hours: 30+30

Course Description

The course Cell Biology is designed to give students a general overview of the complexity of the organism from atom to organisms. Through this course students will comprehend the molecular basis of life from the chemical composition of the cell and its components to the complexity of the joining of cells into tissues. The course is focused on the molecular mechanisms witin the cell and it's ultra structure and function.

Course Objectives

The cognitive, affective and behavioral objectives of this course are following:


  • Making a detailed study on chemical components of cells.

  • Introduction to the basics of energy, catalysis, and biosynthesis.

  • Illustrating the structure and function of the plasma membrane and cytoskeleton.

  • Explaining the structure and function of mitochondrion and chloroplast.

  • Studying proteins and DNA.

  • Teaching the cell's interaction with its environment and cytoplasmic membrane systems.

  • Illustrating basic microscopy of different cell types.

Course Content

(weekly plan)



Week 1: Syllabus presentation

Week 2: Cells: the fundamental units of life

Week 3: Membrane structure

Week 4: Membrane transport

Week 5: How do cells obtain energy from food

Week 6: Energy generation in mitochondria and chloroplast

Week 7: Intracellular compartments and cellular transport

Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9: Cell signaling

Week 10: Cytoskeleton

Week 11: Cell division

Week 12: Cell cycle problem solving

Week 13: Sexual reproduction and the power of genetics

Week 14: Cell communities

Week 15: SEM and TEM intracellular compartment recognition



Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK
LABORATORY CONTENT

Week 1: Beginning of classes

Week 2, Lab 1: Introduction, lab safety, and glassware

Week 3, Lab 2: Microscopy of the letter “e” and cork cells

Week 4, Lab 3: The prokaryotic cell - microscopy and Gram staining of bacteria

Week 5, Lab 4: Eukaryotic single-cell organism S. cerevisiae – microscopy, Gram staining of vegetative state and spores

Week 6, Lab 5: Eukaryotic plant cell (microscopy of leaf, stem, and root)

Week 7, Lab 6: Eukaryotic animal cell: Barr body



Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9, Lab 7: Cell organelles

Week 10 Lab 8: Chloroplast isolation and microscopy

Week 11, Lab 9: Osmosis and diffusion

Week 12, Lab 10: Mitosis and meiosis

Week 13, Lab 11: Introduction to cytogenetics and human karyotype

Week 14, Preparation for practical exam

Week 15: Practical exam from lab course



Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK

Teaching Methods

Description

  • Interactive lectures and communication with students

  • Discussions and group work

  • Presentations

  • Laboratory work




Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

0 %

Lab/Practical Exam

20 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

20 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

20 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

40 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Show the basic structure of the cell

  2. Recognize molecular mechanisms in the cell

  3. Interpret cell metabolism

  4. Memorize cell cycle, mitosis and meiosis

  5. Identify distinction between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells

  6. Illustrate the structure of plant cells in leaf, stem and root

  7. Explain the structure of animal cells through the study of human blood cells

  8. Describe basic cytogenetics and human karyotype

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


None

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

Alberts, B., Bray, D., Hopkin, K., Johnson, A., Lewis, J., Raff, M., Roberts, K., & Walter, P. (2014). Essential Cell Biology, 5th ed. New York, NY, USA: Garland Science


Recommended Literature

Cooper, G.M., & Hausman, R.E. (2009). The Cell: A Molecular Approach, 5th ed. Stamford, CN: Sinauer Associates, Inc.

ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

15

2

30

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

2

30

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Final Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

12

12

Preparation for Final Examination

1

15

15

Assignment / Homework / Project




18

18

Seminar / Presentation




18

18

Total Workload

127

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

5
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