Example syllabus



Download 200,94 Kb.
Date conversion10.10.2017
Size200,94 Kb.

MSL202 - EXAMPLE SYLLABUS

SY 2017-2018





Course Syllabus

Military Science and Leadership (MSL) 202

Leadership and Decision Making

Spring Semester, 2018
NOTE: This is an EXAMPLE SYLLABUS. It can certainly be used as the course syllabus since it follows the flow of the curriculum; however, it is recommended you check your university or college for any specific requirements and format.

Instructor


[Enter Instructor contact information here]

Course Description


MSL 202 focuses on Army doctrine and team development. The course begins the journey to understand and demonstrate competencies as they relate to Army doctrine. Army Values, Teamwork, and Warrior Ethos and their relationship to the Law of Land Warfare and philosophy of military service are also stressed.

The ability to lead and follow is also covered through Team Building exercises in small units up to squad level. Students are then required to apply their knowledge outside the classroom in a hands-on performance-oriented environment during Leadership LABs (team building exercises, LTXs, VBS exercises). Includes a 1-Hour lab per week taught by MS III Cadets.

The Army Reserve Officer Training Course (ROTC) Basic Course is an academically rigorous 2-year college program comprised of four semester courses of instruction, Leadership Labs (two sets, Fall/Spring), and the Cadet Basic Camp conducted at Fort Knox, KY.:

1. MSL101, Introduction to the Army

2. MSL102, Foundations of Agile and Adaptive Leadership

3. MSL201, Leadership and Decision Making



4. MSL202, Army Doctrine and Team Development

5. Fall Leadership Lab

6. Spring Leadership Lab

7. Basic Camp



The focus is on developing basic knowledge and comprehension of Army leadership attributes and core leader competencies while gaining an understanding of the ROTC program, its purpose in the Army, and its advantages for the student.

Course Design and Format


This class will be conducted in an interactive manner. Everyone will be responsible for contributing to the success of the learning experience. Students will be expected to participate in a professional, respectful, courteous, and constructive manner. Lectures will be brief and interactive. You will have opportunity for extensive small group discussions and exercises throughout class to apply learning and provide reflection. Time will be given in class to discuss and work on projects and papers.

Course Map



Learning Objectives and Pre-Class Assignments

L01 Course Overview

  • Analyze the MSL202 course structure, outcomes, and content

  • Explain required course assignments and student expectations

Cadet Assignments:


L02 Principles of Joint Operations

  • Identify Joint Force Structures

  • Analyze the Principles of Joint Operations

Cadet Assignments:



    • Turn in writing program journal assignment (one paragraph)

    • Read MSL202L02 Principles of Joint Operations SR.pdf, be prepared to discuss in class


L03 Army Doctrine and Symbology

  • Identify Common Doctrinal Military symbols

  • Discriminate basic symbols by categorizing and choosing the correct doctrinal symbols depicted in an applied setting

Cadet Assignments:

  • Turn in writing program journal assignment (one paragraph)

  • Turn in Cultural Awareness LA (essay paper)

  • MSL201L03 Theories of Leadership SR.pdf

  • Transformational and Transactional Leadership: A Meta‐Analytic Test of Their Relative Validity By Timothy A. Judge and Ronald F. Piccolo


L04 Unified Land Operations & Warfighting Functions

  • Examine the four foundations and six tenets of Unified Land Operations

  • Analyze the Warfighting Functions

Cadet Assignments:

  • Turn-in writing program journal assignment (one paragraph); turn in next class

  • Read MSL202L04 Unified Land Operations & Warfighting Functions SR


L05 Offensive Operations at the Squad and Platoon

  • Explain the Purposes of Offensive Operations

  • Analyze the Characteristics of the Offense

  • Describe the Types of Offensive Tasks

Cadet Assignments:



  • Turn in writing program journal assignment (one paragraph)

  • Turn in MSL201L04 Transactional, Transformational, and Situational Leadership LA (ROTC Writing Program; 2-3 page Self-assessment Essay)

  • Read MSL201L05 Adaptive Leadership SR.pdf


L06 Course of Action Statement & Sketch PE

  • Define the Course of Action Statement

  • Prepare a Course of Action Statement and Sketch

Cadet Assignments:

  • Turn in writing program journal assignment (one paragraph)

  • Read MSL202L06 Course of Action Statement and Sketch SR.docx


L07 Stability Operations at the Squad and Platoon

  • Describe the principles of Stability operations in the area of operation

  • Analyze how the platoon supports the five primary Stability tasks

Cadet Assignments:

  • Turn in writing program journal assignment (one paragraph)

  • MSL202L07 Stability Operations at the Squad and Platoon SR.pdf


L08 Tactical Actions and Tasks in Support of Stability Operations

• Identify Tactical Actions and Tasks in Support of Stability Operations to identify Security, Site Exploitation, and Key Leader Engagement planning

Cadet Assignments:


  • Turn in writing program journal assignment (one paragraph)

  • Read the MSL202L08 Tactical Actions and Tasks in Support of Stability SR.docx


L09 Philosophy of Ethics and Military Service

  • Describe the ethical theories of historical philosophers

  • Apply theoretical philosophies in ethics to the Army profession and military service

Cadet Assignments:

  • Turn in writing program journal assignment (one paragraph)

  • Read MSL202L09 Philosophy of Ethics and Military Service SR.pdf


L10, Law of Land Warfare

  • Examine the historical and legal basis of the law of land warfare

  • Analyze and apply the law of land warfare to a historical situation

Cadet Assignments:



  • Turn in writing program journal assignment (one paragraph)

  • Read MSL202L10 Law of Land Warfare SRs

  • Review MSL202L10 Law of Land Warfare SH1


L11 Law of Land Warfare Case Study

  • Examine the historical and legal basis of the law of land warfare

  • Analyze and apply the law of land warfare to a historical situation

Cadet Assignments:

  • Turn in writing program journal assignment (one paragraph)

  • Read MSL202L11 Law of Land Warfare Case Study SRs

  • Complete MSL202L11 Law of Land Warfare Case Study SH1, be prepared to discuss in class

L12 Code of Conduct

  • Describe the Origins of the Code of Conduct

  • Review the Code of Conduct

  • Define actions required under the Code of Conduct



Cadet Assignments:

  • Turn in writing program journal assignment (one paragraph)

  • Read MSL202L11 Law of Land Warfare Case Study SH1 and SH2

  • Read MSL202L12 Code of Conduct SRs

  • Complete MSL202L12 Code of Conduct SH1 Homework assignment (Cadre must hand out)

  • Read MSL202L12 Code of Conduct SH1 – Provisions of the Code of Conduct

  • Read MSL202L12 Code of Conduct SH2 – Cornum-Johnson-Miller interviews


L13, Emergency Preparedness for the Army Community

  • Demonstrate knowledge of learning objectives contained in the course content

Cadet Assignments:

  • Turn in writing program journal assignment (one paragraph)



L14 Mid-Term Exam

L15 Writing in the Army Style

  • Describe the Army writing standards IAW AR 25-50

  • Explain the steps in the writing process

  • Explain the meaning and importance of bottom-line-Up Front (BLUF)

  • Understand how to write in the active voice

Cadet Assignments:

  • Turn in writing program journal assignment (one paragraph)

  • Read MSL202L15 Writing in the Army Style SRs;

  • Review AR 25-50, Preparing and Managing Correspondence, May 2013

  • Effective Writing for Army Leaders, Desire Gieseman, Military Review, Sep-Oct 2015

  • Review Army ROTC Writing Program MSL100-200 SR


L16 Military Correspondence Practical Exercise

  • Apply the Army Writing Style and Plain Language Techniques to Written Communications

  • Review a peers written communication

  • Revise your original paper based on written peer comments

Cadet Assignments:

  • Turn in writing program journal assignment (one paragraph)

  • Read MSL202L16 Military Correspondence Practical Exercise SR.pdf

  • Review TRADOC Action Officer Staff Writing, May 2012; Lesson 11 Writing with Clarity

  • Review Federal Plain Language Guidelines, March 2011; Revision May 2011


L17 Army Briefings

  • Describe the four types of Army Briefings

  • Discuss the formats of the four types of Army Briefings

  • Explain the four steps in creating and presenting an effective Briefing

  • Prepare an Information Briefing

Cadet Assignments:

  • Turn in writing program journal assignment (one paragraph)

  • Read MSL202L17 Army Briefings Student Readings.pdf


L18 Army Briefing Practical Exercise

  • Identify the eight steps of the Troop Leading Procedures (TLPs)

  • Describe how the elements of METT-TC, OAKOC, and ASCOPE apply to the TLPs

  • Discuss the “One-Third, Two-Thirds Rule”

Cadet Assignments:

  • Turn in writing program journal assignment (one paragraph)

  • Review MSL202L17 Army Briefings Student Handout 1 (Four Types of Army Briefings) and Student Handout 2 (Effective Briefings)


L19 Team Building

  • Explain the difference between a Group and a Team

  • Explain the three stages of Team Development

  • Identify the two key attributes of Effective Teams

  • Discuss Team Roles and Communication

Cadet Assignments:

  • Turn in writing program journal assignment (one paragraph)

  • MSL202L19 Team Building Student Reading.pdf


L20, Team Building Tactical Decision Exercise

  • Apply Team Building Techniques to a situation to demonstrate Team Development techniques and skills

Cadet Assignments:

  • Turn in writing program journal assignment (one paragraph)

  • MSL202L20 Team Building Tactical Decision Exercise Student Readings.pdf


L21, Cadet Evaluations Process

• Identify the elements of Leadership as defined in ADP 6-22

• Assess core leader Attributes and Competencies

• Analyze the elements of the Cadet Officer Evaluation Report System

Cadet Assignments:


  • Turn in writing program journal assignment (one paragraph)

  • Read MSL202L21 Cadet Evaluations Process SR.pdf

  • Review MSL202L21 Cadet Evaluations Process SH1.pdf (COER); be prepared to discuss in class

  • Review MSL202L21 Cadet Evaluations Process SH3.pdf (COER Support Form); be prepared to discuss in class

L22, Counseling and Coaching Methods

  • Review the Army Four-Stage Counseling Process

Cadet Assignments:



  • Turn in writing program journal assignment (one paragraph)

• Read ATP 6-22.1, The Counseling Process; July 2014; pp. 1-1 through pp. 2-10
L23, Counseling Practical Exercise

  • Demonstrate the ability to Counsel using the Army Four-Stage Counseling Process

Cadet Assignments:



  • Turn in writing program journal assignment (one paragraph)

    • Review ATP 6-22.1, The Counseling Process; July 2014; pp. 1-1 through pp. 2-10, which is included in the MSL202L24 Counseling Practical Exercise SR.pdf.


L24, Final Exam

  • Turn in completed writing program assignment (three – five page essay)

  • This exam is a comprehensive evaluation that contains information covered in lessons L02 to L11

  • Students must achieve a score of 70% or higher on the Final Exam

Cadet Assignments:



  • Turn in writing program semester assignment (See Army ROTC MSL100/200 Writing Program in this document)

  • Study for the Final Exam


ROTC Course Labs

NOTE: [Insert statement here regarding your battalion’s policy on lab participation for Basic Course Cadets. Labs are mandatory for contracted Cadets and may be mandatory for non-contracted Cadets to receive MSL course credit.]

LAB 13

Battle Drills I

LAB 14

Battle Drills II

LAB 15

Squad Tactics- Attack

LAB 16

Squad STX

LAB 17

Squad Tactics- Ambush

LAB 18

Squad Tactics- Recon

LAB 19

Squad STX

LAB 20

Fundamentals of Platoon Operations

LAB 21

Patrol Base Operations

LAB 22

Platoon Tactics- React to Contact

LAB 23

Platoon Tactics- Raid/Ambush

LAB 24

PCC/PCI for Advance Camp



Requirements

Army ROTC Writing Program

The Army ROTC Writing Program will provide you with writing opportunities to give you experience in the Army writing style. Army writing is easy to read and understand. It is clear and concise. Readers are able to understand the sender’s message quickly and accurately.

The Army writing style is “writing you can understand in a single rapid reading, and is generally free of errors in grammar, mechanics, and usage” and “is clear, concise, organized, and right to the point”.

You will develop these skills through a series of assignments. You will write one paragraph after each MSL100 and 200 class that is due at the next scheduled class. The paragraph will include what the lesson was about and how that lesson will help develop you as an Army Officer.

You will use these paragraphs as a foundation for two essay assignments. The first essay is due at the start of lesson 12 and the second is due at lesson 24. Each essay will expand on one or two of your previous five classes and how they will develop you as an Army officer. You will need to explain your thoughts on how the class or classes aided in your development. Put this development in context with examples from your life up to now. Each essay will be between 3 to 5 pages in length.


Readings

Students are responsible for all assigned and/or optional reading assignments. Students are expected to spend adequate time reading and reflecting on all written materials prior to class.


Class Participation


Students are expected to participate actively in learning through critical reflection, inquiry, dialogue, and group interactions. This includes participating in class discussion, sharing personal perspectives and experiences related to principles discussed in class or reading, and working with fellow students to engage in class and lab exercises.

Quizzes


The class is interactive and uses homework and in-class assignments to evaluate learning. Quizzes are used at the Instructor’s discretion.
Mid-Term Exam (Written Knowledge or Journal Essay)

A mid-term exam will be given to test the levels of learning achieved by students in the first half of the course.


Final Exam

A cumulative final exam will be given to test the levels of learning achieved by students throughout the course of the semester.




Evaluation and Grading


Class Participation 15%

Lesson Assessments 30%

Mid-Term Exam 25%

Final Exam 30%


Solid performance in each area of evaluation is necessary to earn a grade of “B”. The following grading scale will be used based on 100 points possible:

[Check your University Grading Scale]

90-100 A


80-89 B

70-79 C


60-69 D

Every attempt will be made to offer adequate written assessments in explaining evaluations. All late papers and assignments will receive a 10% reduction in grade.



Character Development


NOTE: Throughout the year, your individual performance will be evaluated against required MSLI-MSLIV course end states and developmental outcomes. This evaluation is the PMSs’ assessment of your performance against the Army Leadership Requirements Model (ALRM) rubric of performance indicators contained in the SROTC Leader Development Strategy (LDS).

The LDS Assessment Rubric results are documented using the Assessment Rubric Observation Tool (AROT). The AROT assesses Curriculum and Cadet Summer Training (Basic Camp and Advanced Camp) prescribed content in meeting the Basic Officer Leader Course (BOLC A) Common Core Task List (CCTL) tasks and Army leadership development components described in the ALRM.

Each Cadet is responsible and expected to attain (know and do) the respective requirements for each MSL Level. The tasks are grouped into the ALRM Attributes and Competencies.


Collaboration


You are encouraged to work together with the instructor in modifying assignments, suggesting agenda, and raising questions for discussion.

Religious Accommodation

The Army places a high value on the rights of its Soldiers to observe tenets of their respective religions or to observe no religion at all.

The Army will approve requests for accommodation of religious practices unless accommodation will have an adverse impact on unit readiness, individual readiness, unit cohesion, morale, good order, discipline, safety, and/or health.

Requests for religious accommodation generally fall into five major areas:



    • Worship practices.

    • Dietary practices.

    • Medical practices.

    • Wear and appearance of the uniform.

    • Grooming practices.

For more information please refer to AR 600-20, Army Command Policy, 6 November 2014, Chapter 5, paragraph 5-6.

On-line Conduct

As members of the Army Team, our individual actions and interactions, on and off duty, online and offline reflect on the Army and our values. Every Soldier and Army Civilian is responsible to uphold the Army standards and values; applying all aspects into our lives. This includes our online conduct when communicating with any form of electronic media.

Any type of online misconduct such as; harassment, bullying, hazing, stalking, discrimination, or retaliation that undermines the dignity and respect of another individual, is not consistent with Army Values, will NOT be condoned and subject to criminal, disciplinary, and/or administrative action.

It is every individuals’ (Soldier, Army Civilian, contractor, and Family member) duty to understand the laws and regulations pertaining to Online Conduct. It is every leader’s responsibility to enforce those laws and regulations pertaining to Online Conduct.

For more information please refer to AR 600-20, Army Command Policy, para 1-4, 4-19, Chapter 7, and AR 600-100.


Inappropriate Relationships

Per Army Directive 2016-17 (Protecting Against Prohibited Relations During Recruiting and Entry-Level Training and IAW Department of Defense Instructions (DoDI) 1304.33 (Protecting Against Inappropriate Relations During Recruiting and Entry Level Training).

The Army and all Army personnel (including any Army military, civilian, or contractor personnel) will treat each prospect, applicant, recruit, and trainee with dignity and respect as they pursue their aspiration of serving in the military. Army policy prohibits inappropriate relations between recruiters and prospects, applicants, and/or recruits and between trainers providing entry-level training and trainees. At a minimum and as required, the prospect, applicant, recruit, trainee, recruiter, or trainer will complete the following administrative actions. Commanders may add requirements to this list.

(1) Trainers providing entry-level training will sign a DD Form 2982 that acknowledges their understanding of the prohibitions listed in paragraph 5d and their responsibilities regarding the policies to avoid the inappropriate behaviors and relations outlined in this directive. The DD Form 2982 will be recertified annually. The form will be locally filed and kept for 1 year after the trainer has left the unit.

(2) At the onset of the first training session, trainers will brief trainees on the policies in this directive and provide information that trainees can use to contact someone in leadership if they wish to report any issue related to a trainer’s inappropriate conduct.

(3) Trainees will sign a DD Form 2983 to acknowledge their understanding and responsibilities as outlined in this directive no later than the first day of entry-level training. The DD Form 2983 will be locally filed and kept until 6 months after the trainee has left the unit.



NOTE: See ROTC Blackboard BOLC A Curriculum and Course Materials (Protecting Against Inappropriate Relations) for Army Directive 2016-17 and DoDI 1304.33 and Policy Letter materials.

Special Needs


The American with Disabilities Act of 1990 requires universities to provide a “reasonable accommodation” to any individual who advises us of a physical or mental disability. If you have a physical or mental limitation that requires an accommodation or an academic adjustment, please arrange a meeting with me at your earliest convenience.

Office Hours and Appointments


Office Hours are [insert times available] I will meet with any student(s) during office hours to discuss assignments, issues, or concerns. I will also make adjustments to my schedule (to meet with you) beyond office hours, if necessary.

NOTE: THESE ARE SAMPLE TIMES ONLY

MSL 101 (AM)

INSTRUCTOR OFFICE HOURS

MSL 101 (PM)

INSTRUCTOR OFFICE HOURS

ADDITIONAL APPOINTMENT HOURS

WEEK DAY

From – To

From – To

Special Instructions:

MONDAY

0700 – 0750

1600 – 1650

Must coordinate time(s) after 1700

TUESDAY

1000 – 1050

1400 – 1450

Must coordinate time(s) after 1700

WEDNESDAY

0700 – 0750

1600 – 1650

Must coordinate time(s) after 1700

THURSDAY

1000 – 1050

1400 – 1450

Must coordinate time(s) after 1700

FRIDAY

0700 – 0750

1600 – 1650

Must coordinate time(s) after 1700


Course References

  • Course Syllabus (see https://rotc.blackboard.com)

  • MSL 201 Course Map “Pony Blanket” (see https://rotc.blackboard.com MSL II)

  • See YouTube Channel for MSL Videos (www.youtube.com/channel/UC0t6LhApmHQ9YosAOlJ1tDA)

  • Fort Knox Map Sheet & Protractor

Publications (Provide a list of required publications/references for students)

  • [insert publication/reference list]


Web Sites (Have Cadets establish accounts)

  • https://rotc.blackboard.com

  • https://atn.army.mil/

  • http://armypubs.army.mil/doctrine/active_fm.html

  • https://login.milsuite.mil/

  • http://centerforplainlanguage.org/

  • http://cape.army.mil

  • http://www.acep.army.mil/pdf/MRT-C%20Goal%20Book.pdf

  • http://www.preventsexualassault.army.mil/

  • http://www.army.mil/readyandresilient

  • http://csf2.army.mil/

  • http://www.armyg1.army.mil/hr/suicide/

  • http://www.army.mil/media/amp/?bctid=114827147001

  • http://bands.army.mil/music/

  • http://www.timemanagementhelp.com/college.htm

  • http://www.history.army.mil/moh/index.html

  • http://www.army.mil/values/warrior.html

  • http://www.goarmy.com/about/ranks_and_insignia.jsp

  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/ethics/war

  • http://www.youtube.com/user/usarmy

  • https://platoonleader.net/

  • http://platoonleader.army.mil/



Rev. 31 March 2017 of


The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2016
send message

    Main page