Essay writing the law & order approach first you discover the body



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ESSAY WRITING

First you discover the body.

  • We call this the prompt.
  • Read the prompt very closely.
  • Mark all of the evidence that is immediately available.
  • The prompt provides just enough information to begin the process of establishing a framework for your argument.

Next you must study the crime scene and collect all your evidence to prove your case.

  • We call this studying.
  • There are no shortcuts.
  • Reading the textbook or materials is a must to establishing the background of information needed to make the your case.

Start your essay as if you were presenting a legal case to the “jury” with your interpretation of the evidence.

  • We call this the thesis statement.
  • Make sure your thesis answers the prompt.
  • Is your theory of the events in question plausible?
  • Does your thesis answer, “So what?”

You need to provide “evidence” to the jury to substantiate your case.

  • We call these facts.
  • Are all of your facts relevant?
  • Do you have enough facts to make a strong enough case?
  • Do your facts support your theory (thesis)?
  • List any facts that may provide alternate theories, to show complete understanding.

Then you must interpret those facts and show their relationship to the case

  • We call this analysis.
  • How and why did this occur?
  • Why was this evidence involved?
  • How is this evidence related to the facts presented in the prompt?
  • What are the connections?

Explain where the evidence took you in your final summation.

  • We call this the conclusion.
  • Rewrite your thesis statement in a new way.
  • Wrap up all the loose ends of your argument.
  • Do not introduce any new ideas or evidence. It will be thrown out of court.
  • Do not reverse your argument.
  • No surprise endings!

THE PROCESS

    • Always write an outline first.
      • Organize your thinking.
      • Write a rough draft of your thesis statement.
      • List all of your knowledge on the subject.
      • Prioritize your facts by importance to subject.
      • Start with your strongest evidence in the first body paragraph.
      • Lesser evidence in subsequent body paragraphs.
    • Now begin to write your essay.

TAKE THIS G-A-T-E

KNOWING & REMEMBERING THE RUBRICS

COMPARATIVE ESSAYS

CHANGE & CONTINUITY OVER TIME ESSAYS

  • G-LOBAL CONTEXT
  • A-DDRESS ALL PARTS OF THE QUESTION
  • T-HESIS STATEMENT
  • E-VIDENCE
  • 5-C’s
    • CHRONOLOGY
    • CAUSATION
    • CHANGE
    • CONTINUITY
    • CONTENT

DBQ RUBRIC

  • B-IAS/P.O.V. (3)
  • A-LL DOCUMENTS
  • G-ROUPINGS (3)
  • U-NDERSTAND THE DOCUMENTS
  • E-VIDENCE FROM DOCUMENTS (3)
  • T-HESIS STATEMENT
  • T-IME PERIODS
  • E-XTRA DOCUMENT(2)


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