Environmental studies programme



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ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES PROGRAMME


SEMESTER I

SEMESTER II

YEAR ONE
Prerequisite Courses for Specialisation




ANEA1101 :

Physical Environment (3)

ANEA1102 :

Environment and Man (3)









YEAR ONE
Prerequisite Courses for Specialisation




ANEA1104 :

Quantitative Techniques and Methods In Environmental Studies (3)

ANEA1105 :

Concepts and Issues In Sustainability (3)









YEAR TWO
Compulsory Courses




ANEA2112 :

Environmental Management (3)

ANEA2201 :

Geographic Information Systems in Environmental Studies (3)

Elective Courses (Choose 2)




ANEA2312 :

Environmental Politics (3)

ANEA2313 :

Agriculture and The Environment (3)

ADEA2321 :

Techniques in Social Impact Analysis (3)









YEAR TWO
Compulsory Courses




ANEA2105 :

Environmental Administration (3)

ANEA2305 :

Techniques in Environmental Analysis (3)

ANEA2311 :

Environmental Impact Assessment : Theories and Practices (3)

Elective Courses (Choose 2)




ANEA2307 :

Environmental Law (3)

ADEA2324 :

Interpretation of Aerial Photograph and Remote Sensing (3)

ADEA3326 :

Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3)









SHORT SEMESTER (YEAR TWO)

Compulsory to all Major Students


ANEA2104 :

Field Studies on Sustainability (3)









YEAR THREE


Compulsory Course


ANEA3105 :

Conservation and Development (3)







Elective Courses (Choose 4)


ANEA3102 :

Environmental Ethics (3)

ANEA3180 :

Academic Project (P) (3)

ANEA3202 :

Integrated River Basin Management (3)

ANEA3305 :

Urbanisation and The Environment (3)

ADEA3312 :

Advanced Remote Sensing (3)



YEAR THREE


Compulsory Course


ANEA3104 :

Colloquium On Environmental (3)







Elective Courses (Choose 3)


ANEA3180 :

Academic Project (3)

(Requirement : ANEA3180 : Academic Project (P))



ANEA3201 :

Integrated Water Resources Management (3)

ANEA3306 :

Environment and Health (3)

ADEA3328 :

Environmental Disaster Geography (3)



ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES PROGRAMME




SEMESTER I

SEMESTER II

SHORT SEMESTER (YEAR THREE)

Compulsory to all Major Students


ANEA3190 :

Practicum (4)









YEAR FOUR


Students are required to complete their credit accumulation for graduation purposes.




The courses offered are subject to change.

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES PROGRAMME
(1) Majoring (73 credits)

Requirement : Pass with at least Grade C in the Prerequisite, Compulsory and Elective Courses.







Compulsory

Elective

YEAR ONE

Semester I

ANEA1101

ANEA1102


Not offered

Semester II

ANEA1104

ANEA1105


Not offered

YEAR TWO

Semester I

ANEA2112

ANEA2201


Choose at least two (2) courses as listed in the semester to fulfil the credit requirement.

Semester II

ANEA2105

ANEA2305


ANEA2311

Choose at least two (2) courses as listed in the semester to fulfil the credit requirement.

Short Semester

ANEA2104




YEAR THREE

Semester I

ANEA3105

Choose at least four (4) courses as listed in the semester to fulfil the credit requirement.

Semester II

ANEA3104

Choose at least three (3) courses as listed in the semester to fulfil the credit requirement.

Short Semester

ANEA3190




YEAR FOUR

Semester I




Students are required to complete their credit accumulation for graduation purposes.

(2) Minoring (33 credits)

Requirement : Pass with at least Grade C in the Prerequisite and Elective Courses.





Compulsory

Elective

YEAR ONE

Semester I

ANEA1101

ANEA1102


Not offered

Semester II

ANEA1104

ANEA1105


YEAR TWO

Semester I

Choose at least seven (7) elective courses as listed in the semester base on the student’s level of study to fulfil the credit requirement.

Semester II

YEAR THREE

Semester I

Semester II

YEAR FOUR

Semester I

The total credit hours for conferment of the degree is 124 credit.


ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES PROGRAMME
(3) External Faculty Electives


SEMESTER I

SEMESTER II

YEAR TWO
Elective Courses




ANEA2312 :

Environmental Politics (3)

ANEA2313 :

Agriculture and The Environment (3)









YEAR TWO
Elective Courses




ANEA2307 :

Environmental Law (3)









YEAR THREE


Elective Courses


ANEA3102 :

Environmental Ethics (3)

ANEA3202 :

Integrated River Basin Management (3)

ANEA3305 :

Urbanisation and The Environment (3)









YEAR THREE


Elective Courses


ANEA3201 :

Integrated Water Resources Management (3)

ANEA3306 :

Environment and Health (3)















ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES PROGRAMME


PROGRAMME’S LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of the programme, graduates will be able to:


  1. To master the concepts and knowledge in the field of environment that would benefit the universal development of human life.

  2. To practise the methodological and technical skills in the field of environment for sustainable development.

  3. To apply interpersonal skills and responsibility in the society in light of supporting efforts for more effective and careful environmental management.

  4. To practice professional, responsible and competent work ethics.

  5. To provide solution through writing, oral communication and team work and also to demonstrate leadership ability.

  6. To apply and adapt the environmental methods and techniques in contributing to national development effectively and carefully.

  7. To demonstrate information management skills using ICT/GIS and remote sensing to assist in lifelong learning process.

  8. To practice management and entrepreneurial skills.



ANEA1101 PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT
LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of the course, students are able to:


  1. Identify the four major components of the physical environment - lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere.

  2. Explain the relationship between the major components in physical environment.

  3. Identify the major factors influencing the processes in the physical environment.

  4. Explain the importance of maintaining the balance in the physical environment.


SYNOPSIS OF COURSE CONTENTS
This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of the physical and natural environment and their dynamic functions. It includes the four spheres and how they interact and relate to one other.
MAIN REFERENCES


  1. Park, C. 1997. The Environment: Principles and Applications (2nd ed). London: Routledge.

  2. Allaby, M. 2000. Basics of Environmental Science (2nd ed). New York: Routledge.

  3. Botkin, R. & Keller, E. 2000. Environmental Science: Earth as a Living Planet. New York: John Wiley and Sons.


ASSESSMENT METHODS
Continuous Assessment : 40%

Final Examination : 60%


ANEA1102 ENVIRONMENT AND MAN
LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of this course, students are able to:


  1. Recognise the uniqueness of the earth as a habitat.

  2. Identify the evolution of human impacts on the environment from the Stone Age till the present era.

  3. Explain the environmental philosophies and debates related to man and the environment.

  4. Describe environmental issues caused by human activities.


SYNOPSIS OF COURSE CONTENTS
The course discusses the earth and ecosystem as the basis for human habitation. The concept of GAIA and Darwin’s Natural Selection will be discussed. The presence and role of man towards the environment from the Stone Age until the present era will be discussed. The course will also focus on environmental issues arising from human activities in addition to environmental philosophies such as sustainable development and environmental politics.
MAIN REFERENCES


  1. Detwyler, T. R. 1991. Man’s Impact on Environment. New York: McGraw Hill.

  2. Goudie, A. 1993. The Human Impact on the Environment. Cambridge: Blackwell.

  3. Roberts, N. 1994. The Changing Global Environment. Cambridge: Blackwell.

  4. Silverstown, J. W. & Sarre, P. (eds). 1990. Environment and Society. London: Hodder & Stroughton.

  5. Simmons, I. G. 1969. Changing the Face of the Earth, Culture, Environment, History. London: Edward Arnold.



ASSESSMENT METHODS
Continuous Assessment : 40%

Final Examination : 60%



ANEA1104 QUANTITATIVE TECHNIQUES AND METHODS IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of the course, students are able to:


  1. Recognize the procedures and sampling processes that can be applied in carrying out research.

  2. Identify the techniques and quantitative methods based on environmental data.

  3. Evaluate the suitability of quantitative methods based on the types of data.

  4. Analyse data based on the quantitative methods.

  1. Summarize the quantitative methods applied.


SYNOPSIS OF COURSE CONTENTS
The course introduces to quantitative methods and technique for data collection and analysis that relates to the environment. This course includes three main topics: data sampling, descriptive and inference analysis. Finally, this course would enable the students to conduct sampling, to analyze and present data systematically.
MAIN REFERENCES


  1. Moore, P. & Colby, J. Introductory Statistics for Environmentalists. U.K. Prentice Hall Europe.

  2. Manly, Bryan F. J. 2001. Statistics for Environmental Science and Management. USA: Chapman & Hall.

  3. Nurazah Abdul Manaf & Mazlan Mohamad Abdul Hameed. 2000. Statistik. Skudai, Johor: Penerbit Universiti Teknologi Malaysia.

  4. Chua, Y. P. 2006. Kaedah dan Statistik Penyelidikan: Asas Statistik Penyelidikan. Buku 2. Malaysia: McGraw-Hill.


ASSESSMENT METHODS
Continuous Assessment : 40%

Final Examination : 60%



ANEA1105 CONCEPTS AND ISSUES IN SUSTAINABILITY
LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of the course, students are able to:


  1. Explain the concepts and issues in sustainable development.

  2. Explain the role of the environmental components that are significant towards sustainability.

  3. Examine local and global issues that determine sustainability.

  4. Identify the instruments and policies that are used to maintain sustainability.


SYNOPSIS OF COURSE CONTENTS
The course will expose students to the concept of sustainability as the basis of understanding of the relationship between man and the environment as stated in the “Brundtland Commission”, that is, to meet the needs of the present generation without compromising the needs of future generations. Environmental issues such as carrying capacity and limits to environmental development will be discussed in the context of time and space. The students will then be exposed to instruments and policies of sustainability both at the local and international levels. As such, students will be able to appreciate the environment as a valuable heritage that has to be conserved for human prosperity.
MAIN REFERENCES


  1. Blackmore, R. & Reddish, A. (eds). 1996. Global Environmental Issues. London: Hodder & Stoughton.

  2. Botkin, Daniel B. & Keller, E. 2000. Environmental Science: Earth as a Living Planet. New York: John Wiley & Sons.

  3. Davis, L. 1998. Environmental Disaster. A Chronicle of New York. New York: Fact in File Inc.

  4. Cutter, Susan. L. & Renwick, William H. 1999. Exploitation, Conservation, Preservation: A Geographic Perspective on Natural Resource Use. New York: John Wiley and Sons.


ASSESSMENT METHODS
Continuous Assessment : 40%

Final Examination : 60%



ANEA2104 FIELD STUDIES ON SUSTAINABILITY
LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of this course, students are able to:


  1. Apply the various fieldwork and data analysis techniques in the above studies.

  2. Prepare a proposal and implementation plan of a case study.

  3. Present the findings of the study.

  4. Produce a written report.

SYNOPSIS OF COURSE CONTENTS
The course will provide an opportunity to the students to use and test the principles and theories tought in the classroom. The course will also introduce students to real situations on how to conduct survey in the form of research and case study by bringing out students to the selected study areas base on research themes that have been determined. The course will expose students to fieldwork research techniques that could be applied such as questionnaire survey, interview, usa of measuring equipment such as GPS and maps. Through questionnaires and interviews, students will gain confidence and skills in communicating with the public. Further on, in order to increase the knowledge regarding the research issues, briefings by officers from government bodies and non government bodies will add to their knowledge of the issues studied. Therefore, with the explaination and briefing given will also expose to students to the various fields of job opportunities that can be explored later.
MAIN REFERENCES


  1. Flowender, R. & Martin, D. 2005. Methods in Human Geography. London: Prentice Hall

  2. Burgess, R. 1984. An Introduction to Field Research. London: Routledge.

  3. Perecman, E. 2006. A Handbook for Social Field Research: Essays & Bibliography Sources on Research Design and Methods. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.


ASSESSMENT METHODS
Continuous assessment : 100%

  • Attendance : 10%

  • Log Book : 10%

  • Group Presentation : 40%

  • Individual Report : 40%



ANEA2105 ENVIRONMENTAL ADMINISTRATION
LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of the course, students are able to:


  1. Identify the environmental administration in Malaysia.

  2. Explain the environmental management system.

  3. Describe suitable methods for the environmental management in Malaysia.

  4. Identify suitable environmental management strategies.


SYNOPSIS OF COURSE CONTENTS
This course will provide the necessary information to students regarding the methods of Environmental Management. The environment in Malaysia is managed using Acts of Law and other means. Some of the tools of Environmental Management are EIA,SIA, laws and rules, guidelines, education and environmental awareness, involvement in NGO’s, etc. All these methods of Environmental Management will be discussed including the hierarchy of Environmental Management in Malaysia.
MAIN REFERENCES


  1. Undang-Undang Malaysia. Akta 127. 1974. Kualiti Alam Sekeliling.

  2. Undang-Undang Malaysia. Akta 636 (pindaan 1985). Kualiti Alam Sekeliling.

  3. Undang-Undang Malaysia. Akta 1102 (pindaan 2001). Kualiti Alam Sekeliling.

  4. Aiken, R. S., Leigh, C., Leinbach, C. & Moss, M. 1982. Development and Environment in Peninsular Malaysia. New York & Singapore: McGraw Hill.

  5. Sham Sani. 1993. Environment and Development in Malaysia: Changing Concerns and Approaches. Kuala Lumpur: ISIS Malaysia.

ASSESSMENT METHODS
Continuous Assessment : 60%

Final Examination : 40%



ANEA2112 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT
LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of the course, the students are able to:


  1. Explain fundamental concepts in environmental management.

  2. Explain the relationships between diverse environmental degradation characteristics and environmental management.

  3. Differentiate between the needs of transboundary environmental issues management and non-transboundary management.

  4. Evaluate the importance of environmental management in the context of sustainable development.

  5. Apply environmental management techniques in environmental management.


SYNOPSIS OF COURSE CONTENTS
This course discusses the fundamental concepts in environmental management. It draws attention to global, regional and local environmental issues, and the need to understand their behavioural patterns in order to manage the problems. The course also differentiates between trans - boundary environmental management and national environmental issues. The course also exposes the students to a number of environmental management approaches, methodology and techniques commonly used in environmental management.
MAIN REFERENCES


  1. Park, C. C. 1980. Ecology and Environmental Management - Studies in Physical Geography. London: Butterworth.

  2. Sitarz, D. 1994. Agenda 21: The Earth Summit Strategy to Save Our Planet. Boulder, Colorado: Earth Press.

  3. Newson, M. 1992. Managing the Human Impact on the Natural Environment: Patterns and Processes. London: Belhaven Press.

  4. Churchill, R. et al. 1991. Law, Policy and the Environment. Oxford, U.K.: Oxford: Basil Blackwell.

  5. Martinez-Alier, J. 1990. Ecological Economics: Energy, Environment and Society. Oxford, U.K.: Basil Blackwell.


ASSESSMENT METHODS
Continuous Assessment : 60%

Final Examination : 40%



ANEA2201 GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of this course, students are able to:


  1. Identify the applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in Environmental Studies.

  2. Explain the methodologies in implementing an application of GIS in Environmental Studies.

  3. Explain the operation and project management of GIS in Environmental Studies.

  4. Identify the requirements needed in designing a GIS database.


SYNOPSIS OF COURSE CONTENTS
The course intends to the aspects of application, planning and design, as well as the management of a GIS in Environmental Studies. Emphasis is given to the implementation of a GIS application in environmental fields based on specific case studies. The course also focuses on the methods in designing a GIS application and the environmental issues and strategies involved in GIS implementation.
MAIN REFERENCES


  1. Chang, Kang-tsung. 2007. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems. New York: Mc Graw Hill.

  2. Bernhardsen, T. Geografi Information Systems: An Introduction. 3rd Edition, New York: John Wiley & Sons.

  3. Maguire, D. J. et al (eds). 1991. Geographical Information Systems. Principles and Applications, Volumn 1: Principles. London: Longmans & John Wiley.

  4. Longley, P. et al. 2001. Geographic Information Systems and Science. Chichester: John Wiley.

  5. ESRI. 2004. ArcGIS 9: Using ArcGIS Spatial Analyst. California: Environmental System Research Institute.


ASSESSMENT METHODS
Continuous Assessment : 40%

Final Examination : 60%



ANEA2305 TECHNIQUES IN ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS
LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of the course, the students are able to:


  1. Classify the main environmental systems.

  2. Apply appropriate techniques in measuring the characteristics of the main environmental systems.

  3. Analyse data.

  4. Interpret results of data analysis.

  5. Present the findings of data analysis.


SYNOPSIS OF COURSE CONTENTS
This course explains that the use of various environmental techniques must be linked to the human understanding of the emergence of environmental issues (air, water, soil and ecology systems). Students are exposed to several techniques of sampling, identification, classification/mapping, measurement of the system characteristics through the study of maps, laboratory and field studies. Students are taught to construct raw table data for graphical and statistical analysis and data presentation. Students are also taught how to interpret the results of analysis and its significance in relation to environmental issues. The course also requires students to prepare a group project paper.
MAIN REFERENCES


  1. Goudie, A. 1981. Geomorphological Techniques. Berkshire, United Kingdom: George Allen and Unwin.

  2. Gregory, K. J. & Walling, D. E. 1983. Drainage Basin Form and Process. Norwich, England: Edward Arnold.


ASSESSMENT METHODS
Continuous Assessment : 60%

Final Examination : 40%


ANEA2307 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW
LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of the course, students are able to:


  1. Describe the various components of Environmental Law in Malaysia.

  2. Explain on the Environmental Law and Enactments which are used in Malaysia.

  3. Apply appropriate laws to address arising environmental issues.


SYNOPSIS OF COURSE CONTENTS
This course gives the necesary input for Environmental Law. Thorough information regarding environmental laws in the country, including enactments, rules and regulations concerning the environment in Malaysia are discussed. Special attention will be given to the Environmental Quality Act 1974. The course will also discuss the implementation effectiveness of the environmental laws and problems faced.
MAIN REFERENCES


  1. Undang-Undang Malaysia. Akta 127. 1974. Kualiti Alam Sekeliling.

  2. Undang-Undang Malaysia. Akta 636 (pindaan 1985). Kualiti Alam Sekeliling.

  3. Undang-Undang Malaysia. Akta 1102 (pindaan 2001). Kualiti Alam Sekeliling.

  4. Sham Sani. 1999. Environmental Management: Issues and Challenges in the next millenium in Malaysia. Bangi: Environmental Management Program, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia.

  5. Aiken, R.S., Leigh, C., Leinbach, C. & Moss, M. 1982. Development and Environment in Peninsular Malaysia. New York & Singapore: McGraw Hill.


ASSESSMENT METHODS
Continuous Assessment : 60%

Final Examination : 40%



ANEA2311 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT: THEORIES AND PRACTICES
LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of the course, the students are able to:


  1. Explain the principles of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA).

  2. Identify the steps and techniques of conducting EIA.

  3. Summarize the processes and procedures of EIA in Malaysia.

  4. Describe the challenges in implementing the EIA process and procedure in Malaysia.


SYNOPSIS OF COURSE CONTENTS
EIA is a process of identifying and predicting the impacts on biophysical environment as well as the human health and prosperity due to an activity. The first section of the course focuses on the principles general principles and methodologies of EIA. The second section focuses on the processes and procedures of EIA in Malaysia. Students are required to study an EIA report published in Malaysia, and to evaluate it based on the EIA principles and methodologies taught earlier in the course.
MAIN REFERENCES


  1. Clark, B. D. et al. 1980. Environmental Impact Assessment. London: Mansell.

  2. Munn, R. E. (ed). 1979. Environmental Impact Assessment SCOPE Reports 5. Chichester: Wiley.

  3. Wathern, P. 1992. Environmental Impact Assessment. New York: Routledge.

ASSESSMENT METHODS
Continuous Assessment : 40%

Final Examination : 60%



ANEA2312 ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS
LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of this course, students are be able to:
1. Define the basic concepts of environmental politics.

2. Describe the schools of thought and the emergence of environmental political issues at the global level.

3. Relate environmental issues and the development of global politics.

4. Identify the main regimes and actors in global environmental politics.


SYNOPSIS OF COURSE CONTENTS
This course will examine the issue of the environment and its association to the human thoughts. The discussion will focus on environmentalism as an ideology of environmental politics and its manifestation in the global context. Subsequently, the course will examine environmental developments in the political, economical and social context at the global level. Included in the course the discussion on the globalization issues and the environmental political regimes which determine the relationship between states. Then, the role of influential parties in determining the global environmental political climate will be discussed.

MAIN REFERENCES


  1. Adams, W. M. 1995. Green Development. London: Routledge.

  2. Dodds, K. 2005. Global Geopolitics. Essex: Pearsons.

  3. Garner, R. 1996. Environmental Politics. London: Prentice Hall.

  4. Porter, G. & Brown, J.W. 1996. Global Environmental Politics. Colorado: Westview Press.

  5. Stutz, F. & Warf, B. 2005. The World Economy: Resource, Location, Trade and Development. New Jersey: Pearsons.


ASSESSMENT METHODS
Continuous Assessment : 40%

Final Examination : 60%



ANEA2313 AGRICULTURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT
LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of the course, the students are able to:


  1. Explain the various agricultural systems practised.

  2. Explore the relationship between agriculture and the environment.

  3. Discuss the impacts of agricultural development on the environment.

  4. Identify environmental-friendly agriculture practice.


SYNOPSIS OF COURSE CONTENTS
The course will introduce students to the agricultural systems practiced in Malaysia. It will focus on the relationship between agriculture and the environment, factors in the development of agriculture and the implications on the environment as well as methods of sustainable agricultural development. Theories of the relationship between the environment and agriculture will also be examined in addition to a discussion on measures to develop environmentally-friendly agriculture.
MAIN REFERENCES


  1. Symons, L. 1968. Agricultural Geography. London: Bell and Sons.

  2. Grigg, D. 1995. An introduction to Agricultural Geography. London: Routledge.

  3. Noor Mohammad (ed). 1981. Perspectives in Agricultural Geography. New Delhi: Concept Publishing Company.

  4. Robinson, G. 2004. Geographies of Agriculture. England: Pearson Education Limited.


ASSESSMENT METHODS
Continuous Assessment : 60%

Final Examination : 40%



ANEA3102 ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS
LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of this course, students are able to:
1. Explain the scope of environmental ethics.

2. Describe the main issues in the environmental ethics.

3. Discuss and compare philosophical theories and recent environmental ethics.

4. Evaluate the morality of human behavior, acts, policies or decisions related to issues on environmental ethics.


SYNOPSIS OF COURSE CONTENTS
This course discusses the background and history of the environmental ethics in human life. It will encompass the ideas that trigger thoughts of human consciousness in protecting the environment. Then, it will examine the major world religions and their relevance to environmental ethics including the discussion of environmentalism and ethical values. Next, it will review the implementation and significance of environmental ethics in the modern world. Do they apply the values of environmental ethics in their everyday life and in their developmental programs? Lastly, several models of development that are based on environmental ethics will be introduced.
MAIN REFERENCES


  1. Merchant, C. 1994. Key Concepts in Critical Theory: Ecology. New Jersey: Humanities Press.

  2. Mohd. Zuhdi Marsuki & Amer Saifude Ghazali. 2002. Etika Alam Sekitar daripada Perspektif Islam, Timur dan Barat. Bentong: PTS Publications and Distributions Sdn. Bhd.

  3. Pepper, D. 1996. Modern Environmentalism. London and New York: Routledge.

  4. Seyyed Hossein Nasr. 1986. Man and Nature, the Spiritual Crisis of Modern Man. Kuala Lumpur: Foundation for Traditional Studies.

  5. Zimmerman, M. E. 1993. Environmental Philosophy: From Animal Rights to Radical Ecology. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.


ASSESSMENT METHODS
Continuous Assessment : 40%

Final Examination : 60%



ANEA3104 COLLOQUIUM ON ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES
LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of the course, the students are able to:


  1. Identify the geographical dimensions and behaviour of global issues.

  2. Examine what are the most significant global issues affecting contemporary societies.

  3. Explain the relationships between global issues, population vulnerability and potential conflict through case studies

  4. Evaluate the importance of global and regional efforts in addressing the issues.


SYNOPSIS OF COURSE CONTENTS
This course discusses the emerging importance and significance of global issues as it affects the global populace. These issues can be categorized in many ways and include that which affects the global environment and societal wellbeing, global economics, global politics, global mobility of ideas and people, degradation and contraction of resources, and many others. These issues have a geographical dimension in terms of their occurrence and behaviour and are usually trans-boundary in nature, cutting across nations and regions and in most cases resulting in tensions and conflicts. Conflict resolution is a major process in managing global issues which are usually discussed and agreed through multilateral agreements and treaties. The aim of this course is to primarily expose the students to various scenarios of global issues that are affecting societies, their geographical dimensions and the importance and significance that geography as a discipline can contribute to better understand the issues.
MAIN REFERENCES


  1. Cooper, D. E. & Palmer, J. (eds) 1992. The Environment in Quesion: Ethics and Global Issues. London and New York: Routledge.

  2. Snarr, M. T. & Snarr, D. N. 2005. Introducing Global Issues. Colorado: Lynne Rienner Publishers.

  3. Seitz, J. L. 2002. Global Issues and Introduction. Maryland: Blackwell Publishing.


ASSESSMENT METHODS
Continuous Assessment : 100%

ANEA3105 CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT
LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of this course, students are able to:


  1. Identify the sources of conflicts between the two.

  2. Evaluate selected approaches to conservation and development.

  3. Compare intervention programmes to implement conservation and development initiatives.


SYNOPSIS OF COURSE CONTENTS
This course will introduce the conservation movement and its position vis-a-vis the development process. The course will cover the development of ideas related to conservation and the conflicts that ensued between conservation and development. Case studies on selected conservation initiatives at the global level such as the National Parks movement in Britain and the conservation of historic heritage centers will be given due attention.
MAIN REFERENCES


  1. Adams, William M. 2008. Conservation. Volumes 1-4. London: Earthscan.

  2. McNeely, Jeffrey A. & Miller, K. 1984. National Parks, Conservation and Development. Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press.

  3. Appleyard, D. 1979. The Conservation of European Cities. Cambridge: MIT Press.

  4. Haskell, T. 1993. Caring for our Built Heritage. Conservation in Practice. E-library: Taylor and Francis.

  5. Spencely, A. 2008. Responsible Tourism. Critical Issues for Conservation and Development. London: Earthscan.


ASSESSMENT METHODS
Continuous Assessment : 40%

Final Examination : 60%



ANEA3180 ACADEMIC PROJECT
LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of the course, the students are able to:


  1. Design a research proposal and implementation plan of a research project

  2. Review relevant existing literature related to the research

  3. Apply suitable research instrument to collect data

  4. Analyse data using suitable methods

  5. Present findings in written form


SYNOPSIS OF COURSE CONTENTS
Research writing exercises are necessary to provide exposure to students regarding scientific research and academic writing in the field of geography. Research has to be focused on one issue or a new issue which has not been studied. It can be a case study, process, phenomenon, or evaluation of a change in the geographical process. With the assistance of a supervisor, students will be trained to plan, collect and arrange information scientifically and thus present it in the form of an academic thesis of high quality using techniques appropriate to an undergraduate.
MAIN REFERENCES


  1. Anderson, J. 2001. Assignment and Thesis Writing. Australia: J. Wiley & Sons.

  2. Jariah Mohd. Jan. 2003. Garis panduan Penulisan Laporan Penyelidikan, Disertasi & Tesis. Kuala Lumpur: Institut Pengajian Siswazah Universiti Malaya.

  3. Creswell, John W. 2008. Educational Research: Planning, Conducting, and Evaluating Quantitative and Qualitative Research. New Jersey: Pearson/Merrill Prentice Hall.

  4. Sabitha M. 2005. Kaedah Penyelidikan Sains Social. Petaling Jaya: Pearson/Prentice Hall. 


ASSESSMENT METHODS
Graduation Project : 100%

ANEA3190 PRACTICUM
LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of this course, students are able to:
1. To apply theoretical knowledge in the real working situation.

2. To demonstrate basic interpersonal skills and professionalism suit to the industry’s demand.

3. To evaluate the best method to identify solution option based on real situation. rationally the best method based on the real working situation.

4. To employ technological skill for continuous information management in a particular discipline.



SYNOPSIS OF COURSE CONTENTS
The course intends to expose the students to geography industry as means of preparing them for the working world. Students will receive practical experience from both the public and private sector. The industrial experience is expected to motivate, give them the opportunity to extend their theoretical knowledge to practice, enhance their professionalism and employability potential. Continuous assessment will be given based on students’ performance at their respective training location.
MAIN REFERENCE
All book listed for the course in Environmental Studies.
ASSESSMENT METHODS
Organization Assessment : 40%

Supervisor Assessment : 60%



ANEA3201 INTEGRATED WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT
LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of the course, the students are able to:


  1. Identify theories related to integrated water resources management.

  2. Describe suitable theories in the real situation.

  3. Examine main needs to develop the effective integrated water resources management.


SYNOPSIS OF COURSE CONTENTS
The course discuss on how integrated water resource management is managed. There are few challenges on water resource management and also discuss on how to overcome the challenge using the effective and scientific method.
MAIN REFERENCES


  1. Government of Malaysia. 2007. National Study for the Effective Implementation of Integrated Water Resources Management in Malaysia. JPS (Jabatan Pengaliran dan Saliran). Putrajaya: Ministry of Natural Resource and Environment Final Report.

  2. Hamirdin b. Ithnin et al. 2008. Isu-isu Geografi Malaysia. Kuala Lumpur: Jabatan Geografi, Fakulti Sastera dan Sains Sosial, Universiti Malaya: 416 pp.


ASSESSMENT METHODS
Continuous Assessment : 60%

Final Examination : 40%



ANEA3202 INTEGRATED RIVER BASIN MANAGEMENT
LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of the course, the students are able to:


  1. Explain the relationships between environmental degradation and environmental resources development within the perspective of river basin systems.

  2. Discuss the importance, holistic and integrative roles of economic, social, and legal frameworks in river basin development, planning and management.

  3. Evaluate the importance of the river basin system as a fundamental development and planning unit.

SYNOPSIS OF COURSE CONTENTS
The course discuss on river basins as complex systems consisting of many interdependent components or subsystems and describes how the drainage basin unit system and subsystems of valley slopes, channel slopes and drainage zones can be identified, classified and mapped. Thus, an examination and discussion on the processes response systems, their controlling factors and interrelationships within the subsystems identified and how they contribute to overall response of the drainage basin system.
MAIN REFERENCES


  1. Gregory, K. J. & Walling, D. E. 1983. Drainage Basin Form and Process. Norwich, England: Edward Arnold.

  2. Chenoweth, Jonathan L., Malano, Hector M. & Bird, Juliet F. 2001. Integrated River Basin Management in the Multi-jurisdictional River Basins: The Case of the Mekong River Basin. International Journal of Water Resources Development, Volume 17. Issue 3 September 2001. pp: 365-377.

  3. Eyquem, J. 2006. Using Fluvial Geomorphology to Inform Integrated River Basin Management. Water and Environment Journal. Volume 21 Issue 1, pp: 54-60.

  4. Macklin, M. G. & Lewin, J. 1997. Channel, Floodplain and Drainage Basin Response to Environmental Change. In Applied Fluvial Geomorphology for River Engineering and Management, Thorne, C. R., Hey, R. D. & Newson, M.D. (eds.) pp:15-45. Chichester: Wiley.

  5. Thorne, C. R., Hey, R. D. & Newson, M. D. 1997. Applied Fluvial Geomorphology for River Engineering and Management. John Wiley and Sons.

  6. Saha, S. K. 1981. River Basin Planning Theory and Practice. Chichester: John Wiley and Sons.


ASSESSMENT METHODS
Continuous Assessment : 60%

Final Examination : 40%



ANEA3305 URBANISATION AND THE ENVIRONMENT
LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of the course, students are able to:


  1. Describe the basic concepts related to the urban environment.

  2. Explain the relationship between urban development and the environment.

  3. Examine urban issues caused by urban development processes.

  4. Debate the importance of sustainable urban development.


SYNOPSIS OF COURSE CONTENTS
The course discusses how the urbanization process can affect the environment. The course focuses on elements of the environment such as the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere and how the urbanization process can affect each of these. The course also evaluates the effects of urbanization on the quality of life.
MAIN REFERENCES


  1. Hamirdin b. Ithnin et al. 2008. Isu-isu Geografi Malaysia. Kuala Lumpur: Jabatan Geografi, Fakulti Sastera dan Sains Sosial, Universiti Malaya. 416pp.

  2. Katiman Rostam (ed). 2008. Dinamika Sosial, Pembangunan and Persekitaran di Malaysia. Kuantan, Malaysia: Pro Book Publication, 276pp.



ASSESSMENT METHODS
Continuous Assessment : 30%

Final Examination : 70%



ANEA3306 ENVIRONMENT AND HEALTH
LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of this course, students are able to:


  1. Identify environmental aspects related to health.

  2. Explain the importance of the environmental conservation to human health.

  3. Evaluate human influence to the environment and its impact to health.

  4. Relate the environmental phenomena with health disaster.


SYNOPSIS OF COURSE CONTENTS
This course introduces the relationship between man’s health and the environment. Human influences to the environment occur due to human health will discuss. This also emphasizes the global relationship between environmental phenomena and health disaster.
MAIN REFERENCES


  1. De Blij, H. J., Muller, P. O. & William, R. S. 2004. Physical Geography: The Global Environment. New York: Oxford University Press.

  2. Helman, C. G. 1994. Budaya, Kesihatan dan Penyakit. Kuala Lumpur: Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka.

  3. London, M. 2006. Environment, Health and Sustainable Development. New York: Open University Press.

  4. Underwood, L. 2001. Case Study in Environmental Science (4th ed.). Virginia: Thomson.

  5. Yassi, A. 2001. Basic Environmental Health. Oxford: Oxford University Press.


ASSESSMENT METHODS
Continuous Assessment : 30%

Final Examination : 70%





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