English department



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TEL AVIV UNIVERSITY 

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
COURSE DESCRIPTION 2002/2003
The following is a list and description of most of the courses and seminars to be offered in the English Department for the 2002/2003 academic year. The descriptions are listed alphabetically by the instructor's name. Slight variations in the compositions and conduct of the courses may be made as the semester progresses.

Since all Advanced Courses and Seminars require approximately the same amount of written work during the semester, it seems appropriate to restate those requirements here.


1. Written Requirements. In each Advanced Course and Seminar, students write about 3,500 words, divided as the instructor determines between papers written at home and in class. At least one assignment is to be written in class.
2. Critical Material. Critical materials form part of the required reading in each Advanced Course and Seminar, and some attention is devoted in class and in written exercises to ways in which these materials may be used in the study of the literary texts included in the course syllabus.
3. Seminar Papers. In addition to the requirements set forth in the proceeding paragraph, students write a Seminar Paper about 6,000 words for each seminar.

Seminar papers will be submitted 4 months after the end of the semester. The dates for the submission of seminar papers are set by the department. Any request for extension is to be submitted in writing to the Head of the Department. Only requests based on valid reasons will be granted at the discretion of the Head of the Department. Thereafter students who have not turned in their Seminar Papers will be required to take a new Seminar.


Except for Seminar Papers, required written work not submitted by the end of the semester in which it is due will normally be given the grade of Fail (F). Instructors may not authorize the submission of a paper after the close of the semester in which it is due. A student who has a valid reason for handing in a paper after the close of the semester must submit a request in writing to the Head of the Department.

By the end of their first year of studies, students are expected to write clear, well-organized English prose, reasonably free of errors in grammar, usage, etc. Thereafter, any written work which does not meet this standard will be failed.

All courses are based on current reading assignments and on periodic written assignments. A student who cannot participate in class discussion because he has not read the current assignment or who submits written work late will be penalized at the discretion of the instructor.


WRITING PROGRAM
COMPOSITION I, COMPOSITION II, and COMPOSITION III

COMPOSITION I
The first composition course is designed to help the student develop analytical and argumentative skills and to write mature prose. Organization, logical development, varieties of structure, presentation of evidence, strategies of paragraph coherence, and awareness of audience are a few of the issues discussed. Individual problems are identified and dealt with in conference; revision is stressed.

TEXTS: Harbrace Handbook

WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS: three papers; other writing exercises.

COMPOSITION II
The second composition course is designed to sharpen the students' analytical and expository skills by having them develop a number of literary analyses. The primary texts are poems and short stories. Under the guidance of the teacher, the students' essays go through various drafts; rethinking and rewriting are heavily emphasized. Students will also learn how to prepare bibliographies, how to use the library, and how to incorporate primary and secondary materials into their own essays.

TEXTS: Harbrace Handbook or MLA Handbook



Writing Themes About Literature (optional)

WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS: two or three literary analyses (750 words, 1000, 1200 words); the second and third essays will incorporate secondary sources.



COMPOSITION III
The third composition course requires the student to develop an extended, researched literary analysis of a longer work (a play or novel). The paper is usually due mid-semester; the second part of the semester is spent rethinking, reorganizing and revising the essay. Two important analyses of the primary text (chosen by the instructor) are discussed in class; each student is responsible for finding at least two additional essays which are relevant to her topic and which she can incorporate into her discussion. Additional exercises (library work, written evaluations of critical material, additional readings, etc.) are required. Conferences are an important part of the course.

TEXTS: Harbrace Handbook or MLA Handbook



Writing Themes About Literature (optional)

a novel of play

2 critical articles

WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS: 2500 word essay; a thorough overhaul and revision of the essay.



06261217: POETRY ANALYSIS
ALKALAY-GUT, DR. KAREN
Theory Course Semester I Mon/Thurs 10-12
This course provides basic terminology and techniques for understanding and discussing poetry. It is based on the assumption that poetic language is different from the language of prose. We will study subjects such as imagery, meter, speaker, and forms, through a close examination of examples from classical and contemporary English and American poetry.

WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS: 2 hourly examinations, one final examination.

PRIMARY TEXT: The Norton Anthology of Poetry, shorter fourth edition, Margaret Ferguson, Mary Jo Salter, John Stallworthy, eds. 1997
06263033: WOMENS POETRY
ALKALAY-GUT, DR. KAREN
B.A. Seminar Semester I Mon/Thurs. 14-16
This seminar explores key women writers in the nineteenth and twentieth century, both in England and North America, and traces their development. We will begin with writers of the Victorian period, including Christina Rossetti, Emily Dickinson, and Amy Levy, and continue with poets of the “New Woman,” such as Edna St. Vincent Millay, Myrna Loy, Adelaide Crapsey and H.D.. In the second half of the semester we will turn to the poets following World War II – Stevie Smith, Sylvia Plath, Anne Sexton, and Adrienne Rich, and conclude with the contemporary poetry of Carole Ann Duffy, Sharon Olds, and Louise Gluck.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

Each student will be responsible for a report on a single author, and a written report on a single critical or theoretical text. These choices will be made early in the semester.

There will be an essay in class and the seminar paper.

Texts are available on the Internet.

Critical texts include:

Ostriker, Alicia. Stealing the Language. Boston: Beacon, 1986.

06262077: VICTORIAN POETRY
ALKALAY-GUT, DR. KAREN
Advanced Course Semester II Mon/Thurs. 10-12
This course will examine some of the moral, ethical, romantic and aesthetic problems facing the poetry written during the reign of Queen Victoria by concentrating on various central figures, from Tennyson to Morris. The industrial revolution, the discoveries of Darwin, the alteration of significance of religion, resulted in the necessity of reevaluating institutions as broad as religion and as specific as love. This course will also focus on the aesthetic and decadent movement of the poetry written during the reign of Queen Victoria by concentrating on various central figures, from Swinburne to Yeats. The development of poetic forms, such as the sonnet sequence and the dramatic monologue, will be emphasized, particularly in their relation to the social and moral issues of the period.
PRIMARY TEXTS:

The Norton Anthology of English Literature, V.II

Internet texts.
WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS: 2 hourly examinations, one final examination.


06264068: YEATS AND MODERNISM
ALKALAY-GUT, DR. KAREN
M A Seminar Semester II Mon/Thurs. 14-16
This seminar will examine the development of Modernism from Aestheticism through the poetry of W.B.Yeats. In addition to Yeats’ poetry, we will examine poetry by Ernest Dowson, Oscar Wilde, T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Robert Frost, H.D., Williams Carlos Williams, and others.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Students are required to prepare an organized presentation for class, which will be submitted as a brief paper three weeks after the presentation. These presentations will be determined during the first three weeks of class.

Students will also be asked to prepare a brief report of one critical book on Yeats and/or Modernism. These reports will be graded and circulated among the members of the class to facilitate the choice of critical material for seminar papers.

The 15 page paper traditionally called a “Referat” may or may not be a development from the class presentation and written report.
The grade for this seminar will consist of 1) presentation and brief paper2) actual class participation 3) critical report of one book of criticism relevant to Yeats, 4) the paper (50%).

Texts:


The Collected Poems of Yeats, edited by Richard Finneran. MacMillan.

Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol II., Norton Anthology of American Poetry

Selected texts and critical material from the Internet
06262043: AMERICAN POETRY
BACK, DR. RACHEL
Advanced course (2 hours) Semester I Tues 12-14

A Literary Tradition Unfolding: American Women Poets from 1630-1930


This course will study the poetry of American women poets from the Puritan age into the beginning of the twentieth century. The reading list will include Anne Bradstreet, Phyllis Wheatley, Lydia Sigourney, Frances Harper, Helen Hunt Jackson, Emily Dickinson, Emma Lazarus, H.D., Marianne Moore, and others. The purpose of the course is twofold: firstly, this course means to familiarize students with the poetries, the poetics and the specific concerns of these early American writers. Secondly, this course sets out to reinsert forgotten or erased voices into the American canon and to track the unfolding tradition(s) of American women poets.
Course Requirements: midterm paper, final exam, attendance and active participation in class sessions. It is advisable if students have some prior experience in poetry analysis.


06262986: THE “SPIRITS OF PLACE” IN AMERICAN POETRY
BACK, DR. RACHEL
Advanced Course (2 hours) Semester I Tues. 10-12
In his seminal work Studies in Classic American Literature, D.H. Lawrence wrote: “Every continent has its own great spirit of place…the spirit of place is a great reality.” Using Lawrence’s words as a point of departure, this course will examine the spirits of place operative in twentieth century American poetry. What is the relationship to place in American poetry? How does poetic form reflect the particular sense of place – and displacement – of American poets? What geographic – and psychic - territories are the focus of this poetry, and what makes a “place-poetics” a specifically American concern? Readings will focus on the poetry of Hart Crane, Charles Olson, Charles Reznikoff, Lorine Niedecker, Langston Hughes, Susan Howe, Joy Harjo and others. In addition, the course will examine the historical roots of the complex American attitude toward place through a consideration of early Puritan writings and the poetry of Walt Whitman.
Course Requirements: one midterm paper, one in-class presentation, one final paper, attendance and active participation in class discussions. It is advisable if students have some prior experience in poetry analysis.

06262048: SPENSER AND MILTON

Advanced Course (2 Hours) Semester II Wed. 12-14



TASHMA-BAUM, MIRI

The course will consist of readings of selected parts of two central works

Of the English Renaissance. The first is Edmund Spenser's epic romance, The Faerie Queene, written at the height

of the Elizabethan age; the second is John Milton's Biblical epic, Paradise Lost, whose year of publication often marks the end of the English literary Renaissance.

The epic is a long narrative poem that tells of and celebrates heroic figures and their achievements, whether historical or legendary. It was traditionally considered the most prestigious literary genre, the one in which the mature poet examines and re-asserts the beliefs and values of his culture. We will follow some of the twists and turns of the epic adventures, and discover that while each tells an exciting story, each also affords fascinating insights into the thoughts, beliefs and deep-rooted anxieties of the men (gender intentional) of the period, a time of immense political, social and intellectual activity and change.
06262045: VISIONS OF ARCADIA IN THE ENGLISH RENAISSANCE
TASHMA-BAUM, MIRI
Advanced Course (2 Hours) Semester II Wed. 10-12
The course deals with the pastoral, one of the most popular literary modes in the English Renaissance, and with the ideal land which pastoral delineates, Arcadia. We will first investigate the desire for perfection, which is at the heart of the pastoral dream. We will examine different types of Renaissance Arcadias, based in different philosophies regarding the good life. Throughout, we will consider English Renaissance pastoral within the social and political context in which it was written, and trace the ways in which pastoral both promoted hegemonic ideologies, and also subtly undermined them.
There will be one term-paper and one exam in this course.

06262991: CONTEMPORARY BRITISH FICTION
BAR’AM, Dr. ILANA
Advanced Course Semester II Sun/Wed 16-18
Britain today is a multi-voiced, multi-cultural society, in which many new stories mix with and contest the venerable traditions of the English novel. In this course we will examine a selection of texts by a range of prominent authors writing in England whose work reflects, shapes and questions contemporary British experience.

PRIMARY TEXTS (subject to revision)

J.G.Ballard The Kindness of Women

A..S. Byatt Possession

Hanif Kureishi The Buddha of Suburbia

Ian McEwan Enduring Love

W.G. Sebald The Emigrants

Stories by Doris Lessing, Angela Carter, Martin Amis, Jeanette Winterson and others.


COURSE REQUIREMENTS: short paper, midterm and final examinations.


06264057:GENERIC TENSION: POETICS AND ANALYSIS

MA Seminar Semester I Mon/Thurs 10-12



BEINER, DR. G

This course deals comparatively with a number of great European plays which use a

distinctive dramatic strategy, labelled here 'generic tension' - whether the tension be with the norm of tragedy or of comedy. The course has a double focus, on poetics (defining the distinctiveness of the strategy and at least some of its range on the basis of the plays) and on detailed analysis (using, and hopefully refining or perhaps qualifying, the poetics). By implication, the course addresses poetics of tragedy and of comedy, but it engages directly in the poetics of generic tension, its involvement in irony, and its exploratory thrust. The foundation of the poetics is the extrapolation of defining characteristics from the corpus (not theory emanating from theory), and the main purpose is the analytic application, validation through analysis, and especially the analytical dividends there are in such an approach (validity is not enough).

The corpus includes plays by Euripides, Ibsen, Chekhov, Moliere, Kleist, Synge, Brecht, Lorca, and Shakespeare. All the non-English plays are read in English translation. Hopefully, it will be possible to work with xeroxed texts, and there is no requirement to buy any for the course.


06262271: SHAKESPEARE -

Advanced course Semester I Mon/Thurs 14-16



BEINER, DR. G.

This introductory course in Shakespearean drama deals with a selection of his plays,

with at least one representative from each of the major genres. In each case, the course will define the relevant generic strategy and apply it analytically to the play, while attempting to take into account the particularitl order, so that it also gives some sense of Shakespeare's development.

The recommended edition is the latest Arden, but the New Cambridge is a good alternative.


A Midsummer Night's Dream

Richard II

Henry IV Part One

Hamlet


Measure for Measure

Troilus and Cressida

Tempest

06262380: 19th CENTURY AMERICAN FICTION



BEN-BASSAT Dr. HEDDA

Advanced Course Semester I Sun/Wed 12-14
This course aims to examine the development of American fiction from the establishment of the Republic in the last quarter of the eighteenth century to the Civil War. The course will explore the emergence of a distinct American literary tradition, which reflects aspects of the inherent American ideology, as well as the particular aesthetic discourse of the time. Among the authors we will read are Brockden Brown, Hawthorne, Jacobs, Beecher Stowe.

WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS: midterm/paper, final exam


06263036: 20TH CENTURY AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS
BEN-BASSAT Dr. HEDDA

B.A. Seminar Semester I Sun/Wed 8-10
This seminar examines fiction written by American women writers in the second part of the 20th century. Their fiction reflects the diversity inherent in the contemporary scene of cultural pluralism. We will examine their differences of race ethnicity regional and religious affiliation, as well elements they share as Americans and as Women. We will read texts by O’Connor, Paley, Walker, Mukherjee, and Kingston
FROM MELTING POT TO MULTICULTURALISM; HISTORICAL AND LITERARY ASPECTS OF AMERICAN SUBJECT CONSTRUCTION.
BEN-BASSAT, Dr. HEDDA and NAVE, Dr. EYAL

M.A. Seminar Semester II Mon/Thurs 12-14
The course will focus on issues central to the American ideological discourse of collective identity formation. It will highlight relevant connections between literary production and history as well as examine the connection between identity and narrative strategies. Literary texts will be studied in the context of nationality, race and gender.



06263046: THE CANADIAN MOSAIC: ASPECTS OF COLLECTIVE IDENTITY IN CONTEMPORARY CANADIAN FICTION
BEN-BASSAT, Dr. HEDDA
B.A. Seminar Semester II Mon/Thurs 8-10
The seminar aims to examine the Canadian notion of social and cultural mosaic. We will focus on texts by Canadian writers who differ in terms of race, ethnicity and gender and will explore the different aspects of a collective identity they offer, and the relationship between identity and narrative strategies. Among the writers we’ll study are Atwood, Laurence, Kogawa, and Ondaatje

06262058: ENGLISH IN THE AGE OF GLOBALIZATION

DOR, DR. DANIEL

Advanced course (2 hours) Semester I Tues. 10-12


The current processes of economic and cultural globalization, coupled with the parallel processes of localization, raise a number of interesting questions regarding the fate of the world's languages. The course will deal with such questions as: Will English be the sole official language of the global world? Will most of the other languages, or even all of them, perish? Is it possible that some of the global changes will actually help revive some endangered languages? What will the relationship between languages and nation-states look like? What will be the role of global mass communication in these complex processes?

Course requirements: take-home exam.

Reading material for the course will be available in the library.
06262061: INTRODUCTION TO THEORIES OF MEANING

DOR, DR. DANIEL

Advanced course (2 hours) Semester II Tues. 10-12


The course will deal with the fundamentals of linguistic communication and cultural meaning: What is meaning? How do we use language to communicate meanings, semantically and pragmatically, in regular communication and in literature? How much of meaning and communication is universal? How much of it is culturally determined? Special emphasis will be put on theories of Pragmatics, including Relevance Theory, and their implications for the understanding of cultural comminication.

Course requirements: final exam

Reading material for the course will be available in the library.

06262054: EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY GOTHIC NOVEL


GARNAI, AMY

Directed Reading Semester I Tues. 12:00-14:00

When we think of the word “Gothic”, various images come to mind: the mysterious castle, locked rooms and secret passageways, a tyrannical villain, and the vulnerable hero or heroine who is subjected to unspeakable terror. In producing these images, the Gothic also encodes a critique of patriarchal tyranny, and thus an explicit or implicit political awareness. At the end of the eighteenth century, this signaled specifically an engagement with the social, political and economic upheaval which characterized the period and with the desire for individual freedom articulated by the French Revolution. In this course we will read texts that engage with these issues, and which display both the recurring themes and images that mark literary works as “Gothic”, and in doing so also exhibit the variety and heterogeneity of the genre.



Texts:

Horace Walpole, The Castle of Otranto

Ann Radcliffe, A Sicilian Romance

William Godwin, Caleb Williams

Matthew Lewis, The Monk

Requirements: mid-term assignment, final exam
06263048: SCIENCE FICTION

GOMEL, DR. ELANA

BA Seminar Semester II Sun/Wed 16-18

Science fiction is a genre that has largely defined our perception not only of the future but of the present as well. From Star Wars to cyberpunk, from alien invasions to the Internet, themes, images and plots of science fiction are an integral and important part of postmodern culture. In this seminar we will study the history of science fiction, starting with the seminal novels of H. G. Wells and ending with the contemporary works of Ursula Le Guin, William Gibson, Greg Bear and others. We will also discuss theories of science fiction and the genre’s connection to the general problematic of postmodernism, such as the fate of utopia, the changing definitions of the human subject, and the putative end of history.
06261208: NARRATIVE ANALYSIS
GOMEL, DR. ELANA
Theory Course Semester II Sun/Wed 12-14
The course is intended to provide the student of literature with tools to analyze the structure of narratives. Narrative is not only a literary category. It is indispensable to our understanding of science, history, cinema, journalism, and the electronic media. Narrative is the way we think about the succession of events in time.

The course will combine discussion of this broader sense of narrativity with emphasis on narrative fiction. We will discuss theoretical texts analyzing various aspects of narrative, including plot, setting, point of view, and genre. In conjuction with the theoretical material, we will read a number of short stories by Edgar Allan Poe, Arthur Conan Doyle, Jorge Luis Borges, Angela Carter and others. In addition, two longer texts will be analyzed in the light of the theoretical paradigms we will learn in the course of the semester.

Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness

Cynthis Ozick, The Shawl


06262021: THEORY OF CRITICISM
GRIFFIN, Dr. ROBERT
B.A. Advanced Course Semester I Mon/Thurs 16-18
An introduction to the conceptual vocabulary of contemporary literary and cultural theory. Includes readings in Saussure, Jakobson, Bakhtin, Genette, DeMan, Derrida, Foucault, Raymond Williams, Judith Butler, Chinua Achebe, and Cornel West.


06263078: RISE OF THE NOVEL
GRIFFIN, Dr. ROBERT

B.A. Seminar Semester I Mon/Thurs 12-14


What is a novel? Where and when did it appear? It is difficult to answer these questions, but we will read a selection of early prose fictions that are part of the debate: Lafayette, The Princess of Cleves; Aphra Behn, Oronooko and other tales; Eliza Haywood, Love in Excess; Defoe, Robinson Crusoe and Roxana; Swift, Guliver's Travels; Richardson, Pamela; and Fielding, Tom Jones.
06263459: THE AUTHOR
GRIFFIN, Dr. ROBERT
B.A. Seminar Semester II Mon/Thurs 12-14
We begin with an introduction to the issues of authorial intention, copyright, paratexts, and the ontology of the literary work. Then we turn to novels that thematize problems in the relation between the writer and the text, such as Sterne's Tristram Shandy, Hogg's Confessions of a Justified Sinner, Forrest Carter's The Confessions of Little Tree, and Calvino's If on a winter's night a traveler.

06264051: THEORY AND METHODOLOGY
GRIFFIN, Dr. ROBERT

M.A. Seminar, Semester II Mon/Thurs 16-18


An introduction to the theoretical issues informing the advanced study of literature. What is a text? What is its relation to context(s)? What is the relation between author and text? What methodological guidelines are available for reading and interpretation? We will read influential theorists, and canvass alternate approaches to a series of texts such as Poe's "The Purloined Letter," Melville's Billy Budd, and James's The Turn of the Screw.

06262293: THE VICTORIAN NOVEL

GUTH, DR DEBORAH
Advanced Course Semester II Sun/Wed 8-10
During this course we shall study a number of novels that reflect the rich variety of the period: definitions and goals of realism, changing social attitudes and the effect of urbanization, moral and aesthetic preoccupations, the legacy of Romanticism. The purpose of the course is to contextualize the works within their historico-political and cultural setting as well as to study aspects specific to individual works.
Texts:

Charles Dickens. Great Expectations;

George Eliot. The Mill on the Floss;

Emily Bronte. Wuthering Heights

W.M.Thackeray. Vanity Fair

Thomas Hardy. Tess of the d'Urbervilles


Written Assignments: 1 paper, analytical; 1 mid-term test; 1 final exam.
06263578: BLAKE AND KEATS

GUTH, Dr. DEBORAH
BA Seminar Semester II Sun/Wed 10-12
An in-depth study of the poetry and thought of these two major Romantic poets, focusing on both major and shorter works. During the course, emphasis will be placed on poetic style, symbolism -- both Christian and mythological -- and the transcendentalist orientation that characterizes their work. Time will also be spent relating these two poets to their historico-cultural setting and to the ideology of Romanticism.
Texts:

Selected Poetry and Prose of William Blake. (Penguin)

Selected Poetry of John Keats (Penguin).
Written Assignments: 1 referat for class discussion; 1 mid-term exam. 1 seminar paper.


06264066: BRITISH MODERNISM
GUTH, DR DEBORAH
MA Seminar Semester I Sun/Wed 10-12

An understanding of literary Modernism within its historico-political and ideological contexts —mainly European — will serve to frame an in-depth study of works by Woolf, Joyce, Conrad, E.M.Forster and T.S.Eliot. Specific focus will be placed on the revolt against inherited perspectives and aesthetic norms, explorations of subjectivity, the search for new artistic languages as well as on the political implications of self-reflexivity.


Texts:

Joseph Conrad: The Secret Sharer

Virginia Woolf: Mrs Dalloway; A Room of One's Own

James Joyce: A Portrtait of the Artist as a Young Man

E.M.Forster: A Passage to India

T.S.Eliot: Selected Poems



06262033: THE RENAISSANCE HISTORY PLAY

IANCU, MS. DORINA


Directed Reading Semester I Thurs. 12-14

The course focuses on the hybrid genre of the English history play, which flourished in the late sixteenth and the early seventeenth century. Our examination of a selection of major plays will include generic as well as socio-cultural aspects. On the one hand, we will focus on the relationship between the history plays and narrative histories, as well as their relation to the classic genres of tragedy and comedy. On the other hand, we will examine the dramatic representations of regicide, prophecy, retrospect, rebellion, restoration, strategies of war, power struggles and women.

Texts:

Anon., Woodstock.



William Shakespeare. Henry the Sixth, Part One.

----------------------. The Tragedy of Richard the Second.

----------------------. Henry the Fourth, Part Two.

John Ford, The History of Perkin Warbeck.




06262026: PHILIP ROTH AND SAUL BELLOW
KAISY, MR. M.

Directed Reading Semester I Tues 14-16


This course examines classic perception of the American via Jewish American Literature. Both Philip Roth in his Goodbye Columbus, Portnoy's Complaint and The Ghost Writer, and Saul Bellow in Herzog, contemplate thepossibility of jewish male acculturation or realization of the Chrisitan/American ethos. Yet wghile doing so, they question the very validity of traditional Whitmanesqu opr Emersonian notions defing the American, such as indiviaul biography, spiritual self amking, or the masculine/Romanitc imperial self,as discussed in classic American cultural and literary histories.
Requirements: participation, final short paper and final exam.

06261280: INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH CULTURE
MANDEL, Prof. Jerome

Basic Course Semester I Mon/Thurs 10-12


The course traces the development of English literature from the beginnings through the early modern period, emphasizing the distinctive cultural orientation dominent in each period and showing how that orientation conditions the way we understand representative works of literature. It provides a skeletal framework for the sequence of “periods” in English literature by focusing on major figures and characterisic genre.

WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS: Two mid-term examinations and a final examination.

REQUIRED TEXT: The Norton Anthology of English Literature. The Major Authors. 7th edition. New York and London: Norton.

06263074: MEDIEVAL LITERARY GENRE
MANDEL, Prof. Jerome

BA Seminar Semester I Mon/Thurs 16-18


During the semester students will discover how the various medieval literary genre were used to express basic concerns of the human spirit both in the Old English period (in translation) and in the Middle English period (in mostly normalized texts). Specifically, we will read epic, dream-vision, battle-poem, elegy, lyric, ballad, drama, saga, romance, and beast fable. Throughout the course, the primary emphasis will be upon the student's ability to perceive the basic concerns of the text and to articulate that perception in class and in writing.
WRITTEN WORK: One short analytic paper, seminar reports, and a more scholarly BA Seminar Paper.
REQUIRED TEXTS:

The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Major Authors. 7th edition. Norton.

Everyman and Medieval Miracle Plays, ed. A. C. Cawley. Everyman.

King Arthur and His Knights, ed. Eugene Vinaver. Oxford.

Hrafnkel's Saga and Other Stories, ed. Hermann Palsson. Penguin.

Medieval English Verse. Trans. Brian Stone. Penguin.

06264068: GEOFFREY CHAUCER: THE CANTERBURY TALES
MANDEL, Prof. Jerome

MA Seminar Semester II Mon/Thurs 10-12


This course will focus on Chaucer's primary literary and artistic concerns in the Canterbury Tales. Some attention will be directed toward the horizon of expectations one assumes in approaching the various medieval literary genre of the Canterbury Tales: romance, fabliau, exemplum, saint's life, Breton lai, beast fable, dream vision, miracle of the Virgin, sermon, tragedy, and etiological tale, to name only the most obvious. All the Chaucer reading assignments, and especially those toward the beginning of the year, have been kept short because I realize that some students read Middle English slowly until they become familiar with it.
WRITTEN WORK: Two papers: the first, short and diagnostic for me; the second, the referat, a more scholarly and substantial essay. The topic of the seminar paper, for those who choose to write a seminar paper in this course, will be designed in conference with me and may derive from the referat or be on a different topic altogether.
REQUIRED TEXT: The best scholarly edition, The Riverside Chaucer, 3rd edition, ed. Larry D. Benson (Oxford, Oxford UP, 1988) will be ordered for the bookstore. It is expensive. It is also in Sourasky Library. A. C. Baugh, Chaucer's Major Poetry, is an easy text to use. Other texts in Middle English (which you may find second-hand) edited by Pratt, F. N. Robinson, and E. Talbot Donaldson are also acceptable, as is the Oxford Standard Authors Series. Translations into modern English are not acceptable. If in doubt, ask me. For those comfortable with reading on-screen, the Canterbury Tales is available on the internet in a Middle English text including gloss and notes.

06262023: MEDIEVAL ROMANCE AND SAGA
MANDEL, Prof. Jerome
BA Advanced Semester II Mon/Thurs 14-16
This course will concentrate on the origins and development of two characteristically medieval genre, the romance and the saga. After a brief introduction to the background of romance and its relation to the culture from which it springs, students will read a few early and unsophisticated examples of these two genre, some major continental and Icelandic examples, and then end with the omnium gatherum of romance and saga material in English, Sir Thomas Malory's Morte Darthur.
WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS: One analytic essay (with an option to write a second), one mid-term examination, the final examination.
REQUIRED TEXTS:

Gottfried von Strassburg: Tristan, ed. A. T. Hatto. Penguin.

Hrafnkel’s Saga and Other Stories, ed. Hermann Palsson. Penguin.

Seven Viking Romances. Trans. Hermann Palsson and Paul Edwards. Penguin.

Chrיtien de Troyes. Arthurian Romances. Ed. D. D. R. Owen. Everyman edition.



Sir Thomas Malory Le Morte Darthur. The Winchester Manuscript. Ed. Helen Cooper. Oxford.

06262032: THE SHORT STORY

Advanced Course Semester I

Mon/Thurs 12-14

MANDEL, MIRIAM
We will read a variety of short stories, some written in the 19th

century (by authors like Poe, Chekov,Melville) but most written in the 20th (by James, Lawrence, Mansfield, Anderson, Faulkner,

Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Joyce, Kafka, and others). We will discuss various elements characterization, setting, structure, language,

narrative distance and perspective) and examine how these elements

work in eliciting and controlling the reader's response to the text.

Written Work: One short analytical paper, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

Primary Texts: Douglas Angus, The Best Short Stories of the Modern Age

Warren and Erskine, Short Story Masterpieces

Several xeroxed stories

06262170: HEMINGWAY AND FITZGERALD

MANDEL, MIRIAM

Advanced Course Semester II

Mon/Thurs 12-14

We will look at the making and reading of these authors' major works, focusing on their use of biographical, historical, geographical and

literary "fact" in the creation of fiction and nonfiction. Among topics

to be discussed will be the relationship between structure and meaning,

as well as the relationship between fiction and biography,

autobiography, and current events at home and abroad. In the process we

will see how their own and succeeding generations read Hemingway

and Fitzgerald (the men and their work) differently.


Written Work: One short analytical paper, Midterm Exam, Final Exam
Primary Texts: Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises

A Farewell to Arms

A Moveable Feast

The Complete Short Stories

Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

Tender is the Night

The Crack-Up

Short Stories



06262035: POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE
MAURER, Ms YAEL
Directed Reading Semester I Mon 12-14
This course aims to examine a selection of texts which have come to be known as “post- colonial”. This problematic term includes the works of writers under colonial rule, second generation immigrants and authors belonging to the colonizing ‘class’. Writers of diverse ethnic groups, genders, and socio/ political affiliations figure under this umbrella term.

Our purpose is to present a variety of approaches to what may be termed the “postcolonial condition”. This condition is shared by the colonizer and the colonized, the immigrant and the ‘native’, the center and the margins. In this spirit, we will examine the works of authors like George Orwell, Hanif Kureishi and Buchi Emecheta. We will attempt to unravel the complexity of the term ‘postcolonial’: What effect does our engagement with this controversial term influence our concepts of gender , social and economic issues? To what extent do these ‘dissenting’ voices alter our perceptions of the binary oppositions which make up our world.


Course Requirements: Active participation; One Exam; One pape





06262044: THE DETECTIVE STORY

SHILOH, DR. ILANA

Advanced Course Semester II Thurs 14-16


In this course we will attempt to trace the transition from modernism to postmodernism through the changes that occurred in the conventions and underlying premises of detective fiction. In traditional detective fiction, the sleuth is the representative of inquiring intellect: faced with an apparent mystery, he reads and deciphers clues and succeeds in uncovering the truth. Postmodernist literature and cinema adopted the paradigm of the detective story, but inverted its conventions and tacit assumptions: the detective does not learn the truth, because it does not exist or cannot be known; the mystery has no solution, or has several solutions; the detective himself vanishes, dissolves.
The primary texts include stories by Edgar Allan Poe, Arthur Conan Doyle, Agatha Christie, Raymond Chandler, Ross Macdonald, John Fowles, and a novella by Paul Auster. We will also watch postmodernist films based on the detective paradigm: “L.A Confidential”, “The Prime Suspect” and “Memento”.
In addition to these stories, that will be available in the library, we will also read and discuss selected articles from Most and Stowe’s (eds.) The Poetics of Murder (1983), Walker and Frazer’s (eds.) The Cunning Craft (1990), and Merivale and Sweeney’s (eds.) Detecting Texts (1999).
Course requirements: Midterm, a short paper, final examination.

06261204: DRAMA ANALYSIS
STREIT, Ms. L.
Theory Course Semester I S/W 10-12
This course is an introduction to the major trends in Western Drama, from the birth of the Classics to contemporary gender specific drama. The historical overview will encomposs a discussion of the dramatic text set against the rlevant socio-cultural background, to illustrate the mutual influence of drama and ideology. We shall also examine the development of specific genres, and the changing perspectives of the actor/audience relaitonship. There will be a close discussion of texts which will include excerpts and complete works from the classic, Medieval, Renaissance, Early Modern, Modern and Post Modern periods. Relevant critical articles will also be examined to illuminate the changing methodological approaches.
Texts

An anthology prepared by theEnglish Department

Christopher Marlowe, Dr Faustus (The Major Authors, Norton: New York, London)

William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night (Penguin classics)

Henrik Ibsen, A Doll's House, (Cambridge, U.P., trans. Frank McGuiness)

John Osborne, Look Back in Anger, (Faber)

Caryl Churchill, Top Girls (Methuen)
Requirements

Quizzes, mid-term and final examination



06262271: SHAKESPEARE
STREIT, Ms. L.

Advanced Course Semester II Sun/Wed 10-12



06263018: TRAVEL LITERATURE

SHAMIR, Dr. M.


B. A. Seminar, Semester II Sun/Wed 12-14
The course will trace the development of American literature and culture in a transnational context. It will use narratological, psychological and anthropological tools to analyze the meeting of cultures, the role of alterity in the creation of the self, and the trope of the journey as articulated in major as well as lesser known texts. Its themes will include: discovery and encounter, conquest and colonization, home/homelessness, tourism, and borders.
REQUIREMENTS: Short written assignments, class presentations, and seminar paper.

syllabus of this course can be viewed at

http://spinoza.tau.ac.il/englishlit

06262072: AMERICAN REALISM AND NATURALISM
SHAMIR, Dr. M.
Advanced Course Semester II Sun/Wed 10-12
The terms "Realism" and "Naturalism" are used in the context of

American culture to describe the dominant literary styles of American

fiction during the period between the Civil War and the beginning of

the Twentieth Century. In this course we will analyze these two styles

in relation to social and political changes in the U.S. in this period:

the increasing rate of democracy and literacy, industrial and urban

growth, expanding population base due to immigration, reconstruction

and racial segragation, and changes in the role of women.


REQUIREMENTS: short papers, final exam.
TEXTS: Life in the Iron Mills (Rebecca Harding Davis), Portrait of a

Lady (Henry James), Pudd'nhead Wilson (Mark Twain), short stories by

Kate Chopin and Charles Chesnutt, Sister Carrie (Theodore Dreiser),

McTeaque (Frank Norris).


FILM: Birth of a Nation (D. W. Griffith)
TEXTS will include excerpts from discoverers' diaries, Puritan captivity narratives, longer fiction by Poe, Melville, and Twain, and short works by twentieth century writers.
syllabus of this course can be viewed at http://spinoza.tau.ac.il/englishlit
06262988: AFRICAN AMERICAN WRITERS
WEINER, Ms. SONIA

Directed Reading Semester I Wed 8-10


The purpose of this course is to familiarize the students with the diverse materials that form the African American literary tradition. We will study texts which underscore the struggle of the human spirit for freedom - from slavery, prejudice and discrimination. In the process, we will probe distinct conceptions of identity and race, explore the complex relationship between blacks and whites in America, and analyze predominant stereotypes attributed to African Americans.

Texts

Slave Narratives (Harriet Jacobs & Frederick Douglass)

Reconstruction Literature (Booker T. Washington & Charles Chesnutt)

Harlem Renaissance (Jean Toomer, Nella Larsen & Zora Neale Hurson) Protest literature (Richard Wright)

Modernism (James Baldwin & Ralph Ellison)

Contemporary Female Authors (Alice Walker & Toni Morrison)


Course Requirements


Attendance and particiation. Written Assignment. Final


06262034: THE MODERN BRITISH AND AMERICAN NOVEL



WIRTH-NESHER, PROFESSOR HANA

Advanced Course Semester I Mon/Thurs 10-12


This course will examine the modern novel in England, America, and Ireland from the end of the nineteenth century through the middle of the twentieth century. It will focus on concepts of the “modern,” novelistic experimentation, subjectivity and representation of the “other,” questions of national identity (in terms of race, class, and gender), notions of empire, exile, and expatriation, redefinitions of gender roles, and transnational approaches to literary and cultural study. Since we will be reading eight lengthy novels, students are required to have read James’ Portrait of a Lady before the start of the semester. The novels are listed below. It would be wise to get a head start over the summer.
Henry James, The Portrait of a Lady (1881)

James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1914)


Virginia Woolf, To The Lighthouse (1927)

William Faulkner, The Sound and the Fury (1929)


Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937)

E.M. Forster, A Passage to India (1925)


Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man (1952)

Saul Bellow, Mr. Sammler’s Planet (1969)


Assignments: 2 short papers and a final examination
06261500 INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN CULTURE
WIRTH-NESHER, PROFESSOR HANA
Basic Course Semester II Mon/Thurs 10-12
This course will provide an overview of American Culture from the Colonial Period to the post World War II era. Material will be drawn from a variety of genres, among them poetry, slave narrative, autobiography, novel, romance, political essay and treatise, short story, and film.
Texts:

Anthology to be announced.


Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Some material will be scanned and available at the library.
Assignments: Midterm and final examination.



06263027: JAMES AND THE MODERN NOVEL



WIRTH-NESHER, PROFESSOR HANA
BA Seminar Semester II Mon/Thurs 14-16
This seminar will be devoted to the works of Henry James. We will focus on James’s poetics, on the reception of his work and debates in Jamesian criticism, and on issues ranging from national identity, exile, concepts of community, and historical context to intersubjectivity, ethics, gender, and notions of the “real.” His work will also be discussed in relation to evolving notions of the “modern” and the modern novel.
The complete reading list will be available in the English Department during the month of July. Among the works that will be read are:

Daisy Miller


Portrait of a Lady

The Ambassadors

Wings of the Dove

“The Figure in the Carpet”

“The Beast in the Jungle”

“The Real Thing”

sections from The American Scene

06264034: JEWISH AMERICAN LITERATURE


WIRTH-NESHER, PROFESSOR HANA
MA Seminar Semester I Mon/Thurs 14-16

This course will examine the development of Jewish American literature within the context of the American literary tradition, the Yiddish literary tradition, the history of the Jews in the United States, and the problematics of identity (ethnicity, religion, race, and class). Among issues that will be studied are genre (autobiography, novella, realism, ethnic modernism, and others) dialect and local writing writing, translation and translatability, intertextuality, and the ethics and poetics of holocaust writing.

Among the authors whose works will be discussed are Emma Lazarus, Abraham Cahan, Mary Antin, Horace Kallen, Anzia Yezierska, Morris Rosenfeld, Moyshe-Leyn Halpern, Charles Reznikoff, Henry Roth, Isaac Rosenfeld, Saul Bellow, Bernard Malamud, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Grace Paley, Cynthia Ozick, Philip Roth, and Aryeh Lev Stollman.
Critical and theoretical readings will include Sacvan Bercovitch, Walter Benn Michaels, Irving Howe, Ruth Wisse, David Roskies, Susan Gubar, Sander Gilman, Geoffrey Hartman (among others).

Readings are taken from books available at the Dionon and from photocopies that will be made available in a box above the mailboxes in the English Department.


The books are:

Jewish American Literature: A Norton Anthology


Abraham Cahan, Yekl & The Imported Bridegroom

Mary Antin, The Promised Land

Henry Roth, Call It Sleep

Cynthia Ozick, The Pagan Rabbi



The Shawl
Requirements:

Attendance and Participation One short oral report



Two short written reports Written referat


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