English 10 Essay Revision Checklist Heading and Title



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English 10 Essay Revision Checklist
1. Heading and Title: Look at the essay packet you received and be sure the first page of your essay has the correct heading and title. If these items are not on your draft, write them down now so you don't forget.
2. Quotes and Citations: Underline the four quotes in your essay.

Are all four quotes introduced with your own words? Does each have a proper citation?

ex. As the narrator explains, "your quote from the story or poem" (Rabe 10).

If you need to make corrections, do so now on the draft.


3. Transitions: Circle the first word in every sentence.

If you see no transitions, use the handout and add some. In addition, be sure that your sentences do not start with the same words. Make any corrections now.

Revise the following sentence beginners to eliminate them:

This (or other demonstrative pronouns: that, those, these)...

This quote explains...

This means...

This shows...

Also


If the following appear in too many sentences, revise them:

In the story "The Leap" (or whatever story or poem)

Boll... (or whatever author)

The


any other repeated words

4. Examine uses of pronouns.

Eliminate all first person pronouns:"I" "me" "my" "mine" "myself"

Eliminate all second person pronouns: "you" "yours" "yourself"

Use: individuals, people, readers, etc.

Eliminate all uses of personal pronouns: "we", "us", "our"

Use: "readers"
5. Circle all linking verbs (is, am, was, are, were, be…).

Why? Excessive use of linking verbs leads to weak writing. Do not simply delete the verb or use a contraction to hide the verb. You may have to rearrange the sentence completely. Aim for no more than 2-3 per paragraph.


6. Circle contractions (don’t, can’t, shouldn’t, won't, etc.)

Why? Contractions do NOT belong in formal writing. Write out the full words.

7. Essay Length: Essays that are short typically suffer from a lack of thoroughly developed content, unacceptably brief introductions or conclusions, or a combination of all of these problems. Be sure to expand and explain everything. If a visual will help: a well-developed paragraph is approximately ½ to 2/3 of a page long. (Note: since we have only included two examples per paragraph for this first essay, 1/2 page is more realistic.)

8. Edit out lame, elementary words such as thing(s), very, a lot.

in place of "things" use a specific word, or "entity"/"entities" or "items"

in place of "very" use: really or extremely

in place of "a lot" use: many, numerous, myriad
9. Look at the first and last sentence of each body paragraph.

Body 1:

The topic sentence should identify the element to be discussed in the paragraph.

The clincher-transition should review the element discussed in body one and preview the element to be discussed in body two.

Body 2:

The topic sentence should identify the element to be discussed in the paragraph.

The clincher should remind which type of element was discussed--only name one element, not both.

10. Compare last sentence of introduction--the thesis--with the first sentence of the conclusion--the restatement of the thesis in different words.

11. Review Introduction and Conclusion paragraphs based on handout and class notes; be sure all components are included. Let's look at attention-getters.

12. Look at the document format/presentation.

Double spaced: No extra returns between paragraphs!

12 pt. Times New Roman

One inch margins

Heading in upper right hand corner: your name, class name and hour

Title of essay centered two spaces down from heading: no adding extra returns here either!
13. Sentence Word Count Evaluation:

Introduction:

~ count the words in your first sentence; record the number

~ count the words in your third sentence; record the number

~ count the words in your fifth sentence; record the number

~ count the words in your thesis statement; record the number

First Body Paragraph (and remaining body paragraphs):

~ count the words in your first sentence; record the number

~ count the words in your third sentence; record the number

~ count the words in your fifth sentence; record the number

~ count the words in your seventh sentence; record the number

~ count the words in your clincher sentence (or clincher-transition in multi-paragraph essays); record the number


If you have recorded relatively the same amount of words for all sentences, much work needs to be done on revising for sentence variety!!
14. Attention-getter

* Does it avoid reference to the poem/story?

* Is it one of the techniques discussed in class? Which one?

* Is it interesting?



* Is it developed?

* Is there a smooth transition from it to the intro of the poem/story?


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