English 1 Pacing Guide subject to change English 1 cp english 1 Honors



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English 1 Pacing Guide - subject to change English 1 CP English 1 Honors
English 1 Honors students will be required to read more advanced texts, conduct more rigorous research activities, and complete more advanced writing, speaking, and listening tasks.
Fall 2012 Based on Common Core Standards (Pacing Guide with 2007 South Carolina standards and additional texts appended below)
• First Quarter of course

The Short Story/Epic Poetry


RL.9-10.1: Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
RI.9-10.3: Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.

RL.9-10.5: Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

W.9-10.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

L.9-10.5: Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

Second Quarter of Course


The Novel
RL.9-10.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

RI.9-10.3: Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.

W.9-10.3: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well- chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

SL.9-10.2: Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally), evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.

L.9-10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9–10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.


Third Quarter of Course


Poetry and Literary non-fiction

RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of several word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).

RI.9-10.2: Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

RI.9-10.9: Analyze seminal U.S. documents of historical and literary significance (e.g., Washington’s Farewell Address, the Gettysburg Address, Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, King’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail”), including how they address related themes and concepts.

W.9-10.8: Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.

SL.9-10.3: Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence.

SL.9-10.5: Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

L.9-10.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.9-10.3: Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.


Fourth Quarter of Course
Drama/Literary Non-fiction
RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

RL.9-10.5: Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

RL.9-10.9: Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work (e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare).

RI.9-10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

W.9-10.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

L.9-10.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.9-10.6: Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.



•English 1 Pacing Guide

Williston-Elko High School Fall, 2012

Page references are to M/L Literature (the big orange book)

August 16-19

Literature: Daughter of Invention p. 78

E1-1.1 inferences

E1-1.2 point of view

E1-1.4 relationship among character, plot, conflict, and theme

E1-1.5 author’s craft

E-1.3 use of modifiers, use of strong verbs

E1.4 Mechanics, conventions, E1.4.2 (sentences)

E-1.6 reference materials in the textbook (glossaries, indexes, guides)

August 20-27

E1.4 mechanics/conventions (agreement, apostrophes, quotation marks)

Informational text “Ticketed Teens…”

E1.2.1 (thesis)

E1.2.2 (conclusions, inferences)

E1.3.1 (context)



Sorry, Right Number p. 178

E1-1.4 (plot, characteristics of drama, suspense)

E1-1.5 author’s craft (flashback, foreshadowing, imagery)

E-1.6 reference materials in the textbook (glossaries, indexes, guides)

E1-5.2 Writing: narrative/descriptive tone/mood

Aug 30th – Sept. 2nd

E1-5-1 (informational piece, adjust language to audience)

Who Killed the Iceman? p 534 (Skeletal Sculptures)

E1-2.6 text elements

E1-2.7 graphics

E1-4 tenses

Pancakes p 192

E1-1.2 (point of view)

E1-1.4 (character, plot, them) characterization terms, setting

Sept 3rd – Sept 10th

E1-4.2 sentence formation (syntax, repetition, parallelism)

E1-4 punctuation as a means of developing sentences

Island Morning p 514

E1-1.2 point of view

E1-1.5 (author’s craft: tone, imagery)

E1-1.3 author’s craft (tone, mood, style in descriptive writing)

E1-2.3 bias, word choice, denotation/connotation

Qualifications for Seattle Police Officer

E1-2.2 conclusions, inferences

Sept 13th – Sept 16th

E1-3.2 Roots

Effective use of voice

E1-4 voice

E1-4.2 using mature sentences: simple, compound, complex, compound-complex

The Lost Boys 546

E1-2.3 bias, author’s purpose, mood

E1-2.7 graphic aids, visuals

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings 236

E1-1 characterization, theme, autobiography, author’s perspective

E1-1.5 author’s craft

E1-1 character traits

Sept 17th –Sept 24th

Math and After Math 446

E1-1 analyze conflict (conflict of cultures, internal conflict)

E1-2 sequence, implied main idea, idiom, multiple-meaning words

E1-2.6 graphics

E1.4 combine sentences using phrases and clauses

E1-4.5 revision strategies (improve organization, develop content)

E1-4.6 editing

E1-4 Use of colon and dash

E1-3.2 roots

BENCHMARK TEST 1

Sept 27th –Sept 30th

E1-5 persuasion (constructing an argument, using emotional appeals)

E1.5 understanding logical fallacies

Michael J. Fox testimony p. 610

E1-2.1 thesis

E1-2.3 bias

E1-5.4 persuasion/argumentation

emotional appeals,

main idea/supporting details

E1-5.4 claim/support counterargument, facts, statistics, firsthand accounts

The Pedestrian 642

E1-1 theme, setting, mood – analysis of theme (too much tv?)

E1-3.2 roots

October1st- October 8th

E1-6 Incorporate direct quotations/summaries/paraphrasing

Research Strategies Workshop 1187

E1-6 Clarify and refine a research topic

E1-6 Access and use information from a variety of sources

E1-4 Use parentheses

E1-5.1 Create informational pieces, use language for audience

Chuck E. Cheese article

E1-2 informational pieces- analysis of cause and effect

E1-6 research (primary/secondary sources)

E1-3.1 vocabulary in context

E1-6 use a standardized system of documentation

My Papa’s Waltz 676 I Ask My Mother to Sing 680 Grape Sherbet 681

E1-1 Poetry rhythm, rhyme, imagery, mood, motivation

October 11th -14th

E1-5.2 narrative (tone and mood)

The Seven Ages of Man 720 The Road Not Taken (724)

E1-1.7 compare and contrast texts

E1-4.3 multiple paragraph, intro/conclusion thesis, support

E1-4.3 focus clear, details sufficient

October 15th – October 22nd

O What Is That Sound? 714

E1-1.7 poetry

E1-2.3 roots

Procrastinator letter

E1-2.3 bias, tone, irony, imperative sentences, vocab in context

October 26th –October 29th

E1-3.2 roots

The Cask of Amontillado 342

E1-1.1 literature (the definition of revenge)

E1-1.2 point of view (narrator complexity)

E1-1.4 character, plot, conflict

E1-1.5 author’s craft

Grocery store arson article

E1-1.2 informational text (definition of term as applies to a given incident)

E1-1.1 E1-1.2 style (literary, journalistic, formal, informal)

November 1st – November 5th

Angela’s Ashes 836

E1-1.1

E1-1.5


allusion,

memoir,


author’s background, historical background,

conclusions, inferences parallel stories

The Highwayman

Pyramus and Thisbe

E1-3.2 roots

BENCHMARK TEST 2

November 8th – November 12th

A Narrow Fellow in the Grass 790

Hope Is the Thing with Feathers 793

E1-1.7 poetry

Article on Facial Profiles

E1-2 informational text, bias,

E1-6 evaluating research

November 15th – November 23rd

Romeo and Juliet

E1-1 (study of play should approach standards at an advanced level. Other works of literature should be explored if study of this play doesn’t help students)

Research process

Decriminalization of marijuana

Comparing texts

Vocab in context

November 29th – December 10th

The Odyssey

I’m Not Lying, I’m Telling a Future Truth

Where Have You Gone, Charming Billy 750

E1-1 E1-1.5

Elements of style:

Realistic dialogue

Sensory details

Long/short sentences

Flashback

Sequence

Point of view

Author’s background

Historical background

Repetition

Analyze visuals

Proofreading/editing review

Terms review (these are words used in sample test questions)

mood, suspense, trait, flat character, round character, static character, dynamic character, plot, affects plot, foreshadowing, internal conflict, ironic, imagery, infer, setting, third-person omniscient, conflict, external conflict, author’s primary purpose, excerpt, narrator, claim, paraphrase, first-person narrator, third-person limited narrator, motivation, analyze motivation, main idea, cause/effect, draw conclusion, author’s purpose, connotation, denotation, synonym, antonym, multiple-meaning words, context clue, supports the idea, active voice/passive voice, precise verb, strong verb, compound predicate, revise, adjective clause, relative pronoun, precise adjective, series, sensory language, exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, symbolize, appeal to senses, universal message, rhetorical device, repetition, parallelism, analogy, rhetorical question, bias, association (bandwagon, testimonial) emotional appeal (pity, vanity), argument, anticipate opposing argument (counterclaim), fact, opinion, author’s purpose, details for support, classification, chronological order, cite, subheading, transition, historical and cultural context and background, alliteration, tone, metaphor, sonnet, ode, ballad, free-verse, personified, simile, contraction, diction, rhyme scheme, emphasis, meter, rhythm, theme, synthesize, homonym/homophone, end rhyme, iambic pentameter, blank verse, allusion, assonance, epic hero, alliteration, narrowing the topic, plagiarism, reliable source, validity of source, crediting source








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