Educ 4454 – Class 13 P/j methods Methods Principle: Assessment & Evaluation



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EDUC 4454 – Class 13 P/J Methods Methods Principle: Assessment & Evaluation

  • Bell Work: As a group, discuss the following questions:
  • What is a rubric?
  • Why use rubrics?
  • Describe a rubric you used in your last practicum. What did you like/dislike about it?

What is a rubric? (derives from the Latin word, meaning “red”)

  • In educational “jargon”,
  • a rubric is a set of scoring criteria for evaluating student work or “what counts” .
  • It also articulates gradations of quality for each criterion, from excellent to poor.

A Rubric has three features…

  • Criteria for evaluation
  • Descriptors (quality definitions for each level of performance
  • A scoring strategy that is either holistic (measures the overall quality of a task) or analytic (measures specific aspects of a task)

What’s so good about rubrics?

  • Criteria are clearly outlined for students and teachers.
  • Measures learning in relation to expectations.
  • Making marking faster and easier.
  • Enhances students’ ability to reflect and self-evaluate.
  • Fosters individual accountability.
  • Teachers evaluate more consistently.
  • Helps parents understand what and how their child is being evaluated.
  • Gives parents criteria to help their child with homework and assignments.
  • Relates well to performance tasks – no right/wrong answer – allows for a range

The problems…

  • Too long in length. The rubric loses is value.
  • The rubric is too general.
  • Too “wordy”
  • The need to create a rubric for every assignment. Time consuming.
  • Parents are not familiar with what a rubric is and how it is used. Or the use of levels.
  • Not all teachers are comfortable with the use of a rubric. Not consistent use in all classes.
  • If used with children needs to be worded in “child-friendly” language

The Ministry mark programs and post secondary schools require a “proper” grade value for marks on report cards not levels.

  • The Ministry mark programs and post secondary schools require a “proper” grade value for marks on report cards not levels.
  • Many people feel a level, a letter value, and a number grade are all the same thing. (Why are we reinventing the wheel?)
  • The term rubric has a negative connotation – the birth of Ministry documents and government pressure

Tips on designing a rubric

  • 1) Avoid unclear language.
  • 2) Avoid unnecessarily negative language.
  • 3) Be clear on the expectations for every criterion at each level.
  • 4) Have the class help you write and discuss the rubric before a major assignment.
  • 5) Give the rubric before a major assignment all students are clear on the assignment expectations.

How to Design an Effective Rubric

  • Simple Steps to Follow

Step #1

  • Isolate the expectations (refined or otherwise) you are going to assess

Example

  • Expectation:
  • communicate the results of inquiries about different points of view on an issue, using computer slide shows, oral presentations, written reports

Step #2

Example

  • News report:
  • Students can become reporters and choose a story in the news.
  • They can orally present the different view points from the story.
  • Students may choose to do a live news cast, a video or a newspaper clipping.

Step #3

Example

  • Can keep them separate or tie them together if appropriate to the task

Step #4

  • Create the levels (be specific by focusing on the task)

Rubric: News Report – Points of View

  • Criteria /
  • Expectation
  • Level 1
  • Needs additional time (etc) to meet expectation
  • Level 2
  • Approaching expectation
  • Level 3
  • At expectation
  • Uses correct format – article, newscast
  • able to use correct format with limited effectiveness
  • able to use correct format with some effectiveness
  • able to use correct format with good
  • effectiveness
  • able to use format to a high degree of effectiveness
  • Identifies point of view
  • Clear expression of ideas, logically sequenced

Steps in Making a Rubric

  • Isolate the expectations (refined or otherwise) you are going to assess
  • Imagine a student task which will have the students demonstrate all the chosen expectations
  • Keeping the task in mind, go back to the expectations, divide them up into assessable areas (becomes the criteria)
  • Create the levels (be specific by focusing on the task)

Expectation:

  • Expectation:
  • communicate the results of inquiries about different points of view on an issue, using computer slide shows, oral presentations, written reports
  • Potential criteria:
  • Communicate results of inquiry
  • Different points of view – must have at least 2
  • On an issue
  • Using computer slide shows
  • Using oral presentations
  • Using written reports
  • Pull out all the parts
  • Can keep them separate
  • or tie them together if appropriate to task

Example

  • Level 1 – does not meet expectations
  • Level 2 – meets some expectations
  • Level 3 – meets expectations
  • Level 4 – exceeds expectations

Rubric Levels….

  • Level 3 is meeting the expectation
  • Level 2 is approaching the expectation
  • Level 1 is experiencing difficulty in some manner
  • Level 4 is exceeding the expectation
  • Level R (whether it is on the Rubric or not) means the student did not get a level 1 and needs remedial (either the verb or the noun)
  • ….And the more specific the criterion the better!
  • Prof. J. Pitt

Lesson Plan Rubric

  • Criteria /
  • Expectation
  • Level 1
  • Needs additional time (etc) to meet expectation
  • Level 2
  • Approaching expectation
  • Level 3
  • At expectation
  • Level 4
  • Goes beyond the expectation
  • Sang “O’Canada”
  • Sang “O’Canada”
  • 10 minutes in length
  • 10 minutes in length
  • Chose one simple expectation
  • All individuals appear to contribute equally
  • All individuals appear to contribute equally
  • Can count orally to 100
  • Can count orally to 100
  • Prof. J. Pitt – Methods
  • http://www.rubricbuilder.on.ca/

The Information Screen

  • The information page contains your school name and a list of all the teachers who have used the program. These are stored in the program and only need be entered the first time. This screen is also where you will provide a name and description for your new rubric.
  • At the bottom of your screen, you will choose the grade level and course before continuing to the next screen.

The Expectations Screen

  • This screen will list all of the general and specific expectations for your chosen course taken directly from the Ontario Ministry of Education curriculum. Double click or use the arrows to add or remove expectations.
  • You also have the ability to search for and choose expectations from other courses. This is very useful on those occasions when you will have inter-disciplinary assignments.

Criteria Screen

  • On this screen you will select the criteria that will be used in the assessment. To make it easier to find the desired criteria you can limit the list by task or category. You will probably also want to limit the criteria to those which are relevant to your chosen expectations.
  • Select criteria by dragging the text into one of four categories boxes: Knowledge, Thinking, Communication or Application. You can also click on the arrow to have the criteria added to the most appropriate box.
  • This screen will also allow you to create your own criteria and level descriptors for this rubric.

View/Edit Screen

  • This screen allows you to view and edit the rubric before it is printed. You may double-click on any of the squares to begin editing the text it contains. You may add custom criteria at this stage as well.
  • This is the screen which will allow you to have complete control over how the rubric is worded. All of the criteria and the level descriptors are completely editable to ensure that you get the exact wording that is right for your rubric.

Print / Export Screen

  • This final screen will allow you to preview and print your completed rubric. You may also export to Word and WordPerfect in order to further refine your rubric before printing it
  • There are three other forms which may be printed if you find them relevant to your particular rubric:
  • Teacher's Companion Information Sheet
  • Leveled Marking Sheet
  • Checklist Marking Sheet
  • Free Sign-up:
  • http://www.rubricbuilder.com/app/UnauthenticatedUsers/createStandaloneUser.aspx
  • Alternatively, you can create a rubric using eTeacher 3.5 (Software is loaded on your laptop) Use the Class13_Handout_UsingRubricMaker
  • Go To: START – ALL PROGRAMS – EDUCATION MENU – ASSESSMENT & PLANNING – eTeacher 3.5 & Follow the Handout Provided
  • Try It Out
  • (You May Work In Pairs)

Trial Version E-mail Message:

  • Trial Version E-mail Message:
  • “Thank you for trying the Rubric Builder! Please enjoy your trial of all the features and benefits of this powerful tool. During your trial, the only limitation will be that your printouts will contain the word 'demo' throughout. You may remove this limitation at any time by purchasing a one-year subscription to the program.”

Option C – Word Document Rubric

  • You can also create a rubric with Microsoft Word using a table.
  • Use the template:
  • Class13_Handout-Rubric-Development-Gr4-Social-Studies

Other Sites to Explore:

  • Tools for Ontario Teachers http://www.thecanadianteacher.com/tools/ontario Revised Social Studies curriculum is posted
    • Long Range Plan Wizard
    • Expectation Generator
    • Rubric Generator
  • Rubistar http://rubistar.4teachers.org/ Create your own on-line rubrics and checklists from ready-made databases of criteria. You can save and the edit rubrics you have made.
  • Assessment Generators http://maps.google.ca/?hl=en Matix Rubric, Weighted Matrix Rubric, Checklists, Rating Scales

More Sites…

  • Rubric generators http://teachers.teach-nology.com/web_tools/rubrics/ A collection of rubric generators. 
  • Collection of Rubric Links http://www.cl.ais.net/rlevine/coolunits.htm#rubrics
  • Rubrics for Web Lessons http://edweb.sdsu.edu/triton/july/rubrics/Rubrics_for_Web_Lessons.html Describes authentic assessment, template is provided. Gives samples of rubrics for scientific report, oral presentation, collaboration, hyper-studio stack, firsthand biography, music performance, reflective journal.
  • Project Based Learning http://pblchecklist.4teachers.org/
    • Checklists You can create and print  your own checklists for class activities. 

And still more!

  • Kathy Schrock's Guide for Educators Web page rubrics, subject-specific rubrics, and articles on rubrics and assessment.
  • Rubrics and Online Surveys http://www.nova.edu/~burmeist/rubrics.html Extensive collection of rubrics and teacher-skills assessments. 
  • Test and Assess http://www.teachervision.com/tv/curriculum/assess/rubrics.html A collection of  rubrics and explanations of assessment practices. 
  • Reading Assessment - NAEP - Reading 'Report Card' U.S. http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/reading/results/ Results of 2000 reading assessment for Grade 4 students 
  • Rubrics http://www.branson.k12.mo.us/langarts/rubrics/rubrics.htm Rubrics and marking checklists for language assignments: general grading, personal narrative, fiction story, persuasive essay, comparison/contrast essay, poetry.
  • Reflective Practice Activity
  • Review Pages # 287-289
  • Complete the reflective practice activity on page #289
  • 1 more Web Site to explore:
  • http://www.quiz-builder.com/
  • FREE 15-Day Trial


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