Editorial An article that states the newspaper’s stance on a particular issue. Basically, it is a persuasive essay that offers a solution to a problem. Our Situation …



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  • Editorial Writing
  • Editorial
  • An article that states the newspaper’s stance on a particular issue. Basically, it is a persuasive essay that offers a solution to a problem.
  • Our SITUATION …
  • Leaguetown High School, located in West Texas, has 700 students enrolled in grades 9-12. Every year in May, the school hosts an awards ceremony during the day to honor particular students. Usually about 200 to 250 students earn honors every year. The ceremony takes about an hour and a half and the entire school attends. Last year, several students had to be escorted out of the gym for disruptive behavior. This year, Principal Flor Jimenez proposed moving the awards ceremony to the evening so more parents and community members can attend. Only a handful of parents attended the assembly last year.
  • Several teachers complained that moving the ceremony to the evening is not fair to them because they do not receive extra pay for working extra hours. The Parent-Teacher Association president Linda Fowler said she supports the move because it will allow parents to see their children receive their awards.
  • Principal Jimenez said she will speak with parents, teachers and students before making her final decision. You are writing for the next issue of the Press which will be distributed Tuesday, March 9.
  • The HEAD of our Editorial
  • For example:
  • As a result of last year’s disruptive behavior and at the request of several parents, Principal Flor Jimenez proposed moving the end of the year awards ceremony to the evening.
  • The NECK of our Editorial
  • For example:
  • The evening is the perfect time for the awards ceremony.
  • What is your opinion???
  • The BODY of our Editorial
  • Give three reasons why you are taking your stand.
  • No loss of class time for an awards ceremony.
  • Only interested students would attend. The disruptive ones would stay home.
  • More parents and community members could attend an evening ceremony.
  • Support your arguments with evidence and examples. Your English teachers call this elaboration.
  • Only a small portion of the student body win awards, but all students attend the ceremony. If the ceremony was in the evening, no students would lose valuable class time to sit and watch others receive recognition. That time could be used for preparing students for semester exams and end of course exams.
  • Opposing viewpoints are rebutted. You shut down the opposition.
  • Opponents of the move say the audience would be too small, but a small audience is easier to control and more intimate for the students. A smaller audience also means the ceremony could be held in the acoustic-friendly auditorium instead of the gym.
  • The LEGs of our editorial
  • This proposal is a good one. Principal Jimenez is looking for feedback. Students and faculty should tell her they support this change to make this year’s ceremony better than ever.
  • .
  • What went wrong?
  • You didn’t take a stand. (There are both positives and negatives to this new proposal.)
  • The argument was trite and generalized. Be specific to the situation. (Award ceremonies are outdated and should be abolished.)
  • You asked too many rhetorical questions without stating an opinion. (Why would anyone want to change this? Why can’t students behave? Why should students attend?)
  • You used quotes. One (maybe) quote is enough for an editorial. You don’t need any.
  • What went wrong?
  • The wording was pompous or pretentious. (Scholarly learners are worthy of acknowledgement for toiling on their diurnal coursework.)
  • You turned into a preacher. (Disruptive students must attend awards ceremonies to learn how to become better people.)
  • You got off topic. (Receiving an award can change a student’s life. It changed mine.)
  • Your argument lacked credibility. (The awards ceremony should be held in the morning because disruptive students don’t come to school early.)
  • You used stereotypes or made personal attacks. (Principal Jimenez is stupid for suggesting this change.)
  • As a result of last year’s disruptive behavior and at the request of several parents, Principal Flor Jimenez proposed moving the end of the year awards ceremony to the evening.
  • While this plan has its drawbacks, it’s not all bad.
  • For instance, having a ceremony at night would allow more parents and community members to attend. Not all parents can take off work in the middle of the day to see their student receive an award.
  • On the other hand, if the ceremony is held at night, not all students will attend. This ceremony could motivate non-award-winning students to do better in classes. If they are not there, how can they be motivated?
  • What went wrong?
  • As a result of last year’s disruptive behavior and at the request of several parents, Principal Flor Jimenez proposed moving the end of the year awards ceremony to the evening.
  • This is a good idea for the students and the parents.
  • An evening award ceremony could be more formal for parents and students. Students could use this opportunity to wear their prom dresses and nice suits. Only wearing a prom dress once during high school seems like a waste of money and quite silly. Parents also could wear their Sunday best so everyone would look spectacular at the ceremony.
  • What went wrong?
  • Starting at the dawn of the new year, young scholars who excel in their learning environment have been praised by their educationalists at a ceremonial festivity.
  • At present, Principal Flor Jimenez has put forth a blueprint to dispose of the school day annual ritual. She would like to transport this passage to dusk.
  • This plan is atrocious. It will affect a plethora of young scholars in a detrimental manner.
  • What went wrong?
  • Remember the key to a successful Editorial …
  • Think. Original thought.
  • Provide strong evidence to support your stance
  • Write in third person (some first person plural)
  • Remember the key to a successful Editorial …
  • On contest day …
  • Read the entire prompt
  • Decide on a stance
  • Using the prompt, write three supportive statements
  • Highlight elaboration for your statements in the prompt
  • Write
  • Time to work!!
  • Divide the room in two.
  • One side is for. One side is against.
  • With your group, read the prompt and write a sentence stating your stance.
  • Write three statements supporting your stance.


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