Dyslexi a what is dyslexia? The dyslexic brain positive side of dyslexia how many are affected? Social and emotional aspects emotional repercussions effect on others emotions why is counselling useful? 10



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D Y S L E X I A

1. WHAT IS DYSLEXIA?
2. THE DYSLEXIC BRAIN
3. POSITIVE SIDE OF DYSLEXIA
4. HOW MANY ARE AFFECTED?
5. SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL ASPECTS
6. EMOTIONAL REPERCUSSIONS
7. EFFECT ON OTHERS
8. EMOTIONS
9. WHY IS COUNSELLING USEFUL?
10. TRANSITIONS OF LIFE DYSLEXIA CAN IMPACT ON
11. PRESENTING ISSUES




1. WHAT IS DYSLEXIA?

Dyslexia is the name given to a specific learning difficulty (SpLD) which impedes the typical progress in learning to be literate. However, this is a very narrow and slightly misleading view. Most recent research suggests that it changes the way in which the brain functions, including where certain brain activities are carried out. These changes are responsible for the difficulties and some particular strengths that those with dyslexia and related conditions may experience.



The problems experienced in language processing distinguish dyslexics as a group. This means that the dyslexic has problems translating language to thought (as in reading or listening). It's helpful to think of these conditions as creating difficulties in the intake and manipulation of data.

2. THE DYSLEXIC BRAIN

The British Dyslexia Association states dyslexia is actually one condition amongst a group which are considered to co-exist and is a genetic condition. Dyslexia results from differences in the structure and function of the brain. There are two distinct features of the brains of dyslexic people; firstly, they contain malformations in the cortex and, secondly, they show less cerebral asymmetry than 'normal' brains. There is also a suggestion that there is a difference in the connections between hemispheres and that therefore the pattern of communication between hemispheres is also different (Galaburda 1999). This may support the notion that dyslexic people think differently and it may also allow for claims that the difference is linked to a special ability.



3. POSITIVE SIDE OF DYSLEXIA

The positive side of dyslexia is an ability to conceptualise on a broader scale and to see the whole before others do. There is a great deal of research into dyslexic weaknesses but virtually none into the question of whether they have distinctive strengths. The non-dyslexic world has determined the place of written language and the value of academic success in our society. In fact, many of those who have contributed greatly to both our culture and economic life have not been academically successful.

Dyslexic people can often perform a range of complex tasks, such as solving complicated problems in science and design, yet cannot do the seemingly simple: learn to read and spell, order and organise writing, copy from the board, remember instructions, tell the time or find their way around. Intelligence is not the problem. An unexpected gap exists between learning aptitude and achievement.

With regard to their attributes, dyslexics have good listening skills: an area of proficiency for many simply because they may rely on taking information in through auditory channels to avoid having to read or write. They also possess right-brained attributes such as: empathy, creativity, innovation, problem-solving approaches, lateral thinking, patience and tenacity.



"To what extent are learning disabilities just a difference in style that becomes a disability because of our lack of understanding about individual learning differences. If teachers were able to respond better to different learning styles we might erase the notion of disability" (Rieff et al, 1997)
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