Dr tj owens “Be Someone. Go Somewhere. Seek Excellence.”



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Intervention Classes


Students who are below grade level in Math or Reading, or who have not passed the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) will be required to take a class to help them achieve at the secondary/college level. Intervention placements are based on the student’s grades, CST scores, teacher recommendation and/or CAHSEE Test Scores.
Advanced Placement (AP)

Advanced Placement courses are offered in the 10th, 11th and 12th courses. These high school courses are conducted at the collegiate level and, under certain conditions, grant both high school and college credit. Students in these courses are expected to achieve the quality of work ordinarily required of college freshmen. On completion of an Advanced Placement course, students take an examination administered and evaluated by the College Entrance Examination Board. Parents pay the cost of this examination. Ask your counselor about waiver options.


Honors Program

Honors courses are offered in all academic areas. . They are a higher level of academic instruction in the content areas. Honors courses require a greater depth and complexity as well as creativity in the content area. These courses often require reading at a higher academic level. These courses will better prepare the student for the Advanced Placement courses in their junior or senior year, as well as college courses they will be taking.


California Scholarship Federation (CSF)

The California Scholarship Federation is a scholastic honor society. The main purpose of CSF is to recognize students for their achievement. CSF also stresses the responsibility of using their talents by serving others-thus the motto “Scholarship for Service.” Students are encouraged to complete at least 4 hours of community service each semester. Applications for CSF are accepted during the first 3 weeks of each semester. To qualify for CSF membership the student must earn a minimum of 10 points from last semester’s grades. Three “points” are awarded for an A, 1 point for a B in core academic classes. Students may also qualify for Life Membership and will receive the honor of wearing the gold stole at graduation.



Test Descriptions



Advanced Placement (AP)

Advanced Placement Courses are designed to offer students more academic challenges than standard high school courses and to prepare students for the rigors of college. The national AP exams are given in May. AP exams align with the rigor of these courses and mirror college exit exams in format. “AP” designates courses with national standards and a national exam. An additional grade point is given for grades of a C or better when calculating the grade point average (GPA).


CAHSEE (California High School Exit Exam)

Public school students must pass the high school exit exam to receive a high school diploma. It was determined by the State that the CAHSEE would become required for all current incumbent 10th grade students (graduating class of 2006). CAHSEE is typically administered during February, March, and/ or April.


CST (California Standards Tests)

The California Standards Tests in English-language arts, mathematics, science, and history-social science are comprised of items that were developed specifically to assess student performance on California’s Academic Content Standards. The State Board of Education adopted theses standards

that specify what all California students are expected to know and be able to do. The Academic Content Standards are grade or course specific. Thus, a student taking a specific history or science class will take a CST on that particular subject (i.e. Algebra I, Geometry, Biology, Chemistry, etc.).
CELDT (California English Language Development Test)

The CELDT is an annual English proficiency test that the state of California requires be administered to all English Learners (ELL). The test, which has listening, speaking, reading, and writing components, is given during the month of September to all ELLS. The purpose of the CELDT test is to 1) identify new students who are ELL; 2) monitor their progress in learning English; and/or 3) help decide when they can be reclassified as Fluent English Proficient.




College Entrance Exams


ACT

The “A-C-T” as it is commonly called, is a national college admission examination that consists of tests in: Mathematics, Reading, Science and combined English/Writing. The ACT results are accepted by almost all U.S. colleges and universities. It is also preferred by many private colleges and public universities.



www.act.org
PSAT/NMSQT

The Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test is a standardized test that provides firsthand practice for the SAT Reasoning Test™. It also gives students a chance to enter the National Merit Scholarship Corporation (NMSC) scholarship programs. The PSAT/NMSQT measures: critical reading skills, math problem-solving skills, and writing skills. The PSAT is only administered one time per year in October.


SAT Reasoning

The SAT is a measured of the critical thinking skills needed for academic success in college. It assesses

how well you analyze and solve problems. Each section of the SAT is scored on a scale of 200-800, and the writing section will contain two sub scores. The SAT is typically taken by high school juniors and seniors. www.collegeboard.com
SAT Subject Tests

SAT Subject Tests (formerly SAT II: Subject Tests) are designed to measure knowledge and skills in particular subject areas, as well as the ability to apply that knowledge. Subject Tests are one-hour, multiple choice tests. Many colleges use these exams as an indicator of subject mastery and as an entrance requirement. Some colleges specify the Subject Tests they require; others allow applicants to choose which tests to take. Check with the college(s) to see which tests they require.




Dr TJ Owens Gilroy Early College

High School Graduation Requirements:




Min. Credits

Total

Area

UC/CSU “A-G” Requirements

English Language Arts

 

40

A”

4 years of college prep English

Freshman Honors English

10

 

Sophomore Honors English

10

 

Junior AP English Language

10

 

Senior AP English Literature and/or College Coursework

10-20

 

History – Social Science

 

40

B”

Two years History/Social Science to include: one year World History and one year US History; or one-half year US History and one-half year Civics or US Government

 


Freshman World Geography (Honors)

10

 

Sophomore World History (AP)

10

 

Junior US History (AP)

10

 

Senior American Government (AP) and

5

 

Senior Economics (AP)

5

 







 

Mathematics

 

40

C”

Three years of math through second year Algebra (Algebra II); 4 years recommended

Freshman Algebra I (CP) (as per assessment)

10

 

Freshman/Sophomore Geometry (Honors)

10

 

Sophomore/Junior Algebra II (Honors)

10

 

Required College Coursework (Pre-Calc minimum)

10-20

 

Science

 

35

D”

One year biological science and one year physical science; three years are strongly recommended

Sophomore Biology (Honors)

10

 

Junior - College Chemistry

10-20

 

Recommended College Coursework

10-20

 

World Language

 

30

E”

Two years of the same language; three years are strongly recommended

Required College Foreign Language Coursework (2 Semesters)

30

 

Visual and Performing Arts

 

10

F”

One year from a single arts area

Elective College Fine Arts Coursework

10

 

Computer Education/Vocational Arts




5

G”

One year of a college preparatory elective

Required College Coursework




 

Physical Education

 

20

Freshman PE 9

10

 

Elective College PE Coursework




 

Health

 

5

Required College Coursework (Health Education)

5

 

Electives

 

150

AVID 9-12

40

 

Writers Workshop

30-40

 

Math Support

10-40

 

Seminar

10-40

 

Elective College Coursework

60

 

Total Credits Required for Graduation

 

360

 

Meeting Dr TJ Owens graduation requirements automatically ensures that all “A-G” requirements and recommendations are met


Other Offered High School Elective Courses:


Course Name

Grades Levels

Credits per Semester

Maximum Possible Credits

Academic Decathlon (Honors)

9-12

5

40

Digital Journalism/Yearbook Design

9-12

5

40

Teaching Assistant/AVID Tutor

10-12

5

30

Student Leadership (Student Government/Tribunal)

9-12

5

40

 

  Notes:

        I. Students will receive a diploma of graduation from Gilroy Unified Early College Academy only after:


  • Meeting the district graduation requirements for GECA (360 credits)

  • Passing the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE)

  • Passing Algebra 1-2 (Ed Code 51224.5)

  • Obtaining a minimum of 40 transferable college credits

             Only students who meet all of the above requirements may participate in the graduation ceremony.

II. Because this is an Early College, students will be able to take college transfer classes in conjunction with their high school diploma courses to obtain their AA , AS degree or 60 transferable units. A 4-5 year plan with a college and high school counselor will be completed during their freshman year and amended yearly.
Early College Diploma Graduation Academic Plan that meets Graduation with A-G University Requirements


Freshman

GR

CR

(Units)

Freshman

GR

CR

(Units)




Sophomore

GR

CR

(Units)

Sophomore

GR

CR

(Units)

1st Semester

2nd Semester




1st Semester

2nd Semester

English I Honors

Writers Workshop



 

  5

English I Honors

Writers Workshop



 

 5




English II Honors

Writers Workshop



 

 5

English II Honors

Writers Workshop



 

  5

 


5

 

 

5




 

 

5

 


5

Global Studies/Geog. Honors

 

 

Global Studies/Geog. Honors

 

 




AP World History

 

 

AP World History

 

 

 

  5

 

 5







 

 5




 

  5

Math:

 

 

Math:

 

 




Math:

 

 

Math:

 

 

Algebra I (H) or Geometry (H)

 

  5

Algebra I (H) or higher

 

  5




Geometry (H) or Higher

 

 5

Geometry (H) or Higher

 

  5

9th Grade P. E

 

 5

9th Grade P.E

 

  5




Biology H

 

 5

Biology H


 

 5

AVID 9

 

  5

AVID 9

 

  5




AVID 10

 

 5

AVID 10

 

  5

Seminar/ College Course (Optional)


 

 

5



Seminar/College Course(s)

 

  10

(3)






Required/Optional College Course(s)

 

 10

(3)

Required/Optional College Course(s)

 

  10

(3)

Semester Total:

 

  35

Semester Total:

 

40 




Semester Total:

 

  40

Semester Total:

 

 40

Intercession:

Guidance 6

 

  5

(2)

Year Total:

 

 




Summer School:

 

 

Year Total:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  75




 

 

 

 

 

  80








































Junior

GR

CR

(Units)

Junior

GR

CR

(Units)




Senior

GR

CR

(Units)

Senior

GR

CR

(Units)

1st Semester

2nd Semester




1st Semester

2nd Semester

AP Language English

Writers Workshop



 

  5

AP Language English

Writers Workshop



 

5




AP Literature or College English Course

 

 

AP Literature or College English Course

 

 

 




 






 

  5

 

  5

 

  5

 

 5




 

 

 

 

AP U.S. History

 

  5

AP U.S. History

 

 







 

 




 

 

 

 

 

 5




AP Government

 

  5

AP Economics

 

 5

Math: Algebra II

 

  5

Math: Algebra II

 

  5




AVID 12

 

  5

AVID 12

 

  5

or higher

 

 

or higher

 

 







 

 




 

 

AVID 11

 

  5

AVID 11

 

  5




Phy Sci Required/Optional College Courses(s)

 

  30

(9)

Required/Optional College Course(s)


 

  30

(9)

 

 

 

 




 

 

 

 

Foreign Language

Required/Optional College Course(s)



 

  15

(5)


Foreign Language
Required/Optional College Course (s)

 

  20

(6)




Other HS/College Electives

 

5-10

Other HS Electives

 

 5-10


Semester Total:

 


50 


Semester Total:

 


50





Semester Total:

 


50


Semester Total:

 

  50



 

 

 

 

 

 




 

 

 

 

 

 

Summer School:

 

 

Year Total:

 

 100




Summer School:

 

 

Year Total:

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




 

 

 

 

 

 




CREDITS FOR GRADUATION




9

10

11

12

Earned:













In Progress:













Total:










360

School Policies and Guidelines
Grading Policy

Grades for Achievement shall be reported for each marking period as follows:


Grade: Description Grade

Points


A Outstanding Achievement 4.0

B Above Average Achievement 3.0

C Average Achievement 2.0

D Below Average Achievement 1.0

F Little or No Achievement 0

I Incomplete 0

Advance Placement course grades will earn an additional grade point for A, B or C grades)
Eligibility Policy
Standards for Probation for High School:
Academic Probation: A student who has accumulated a GPA below 2.5 in high school core classes (English, math, social science, and science) at semester shall be placed on academic probation. A student must have a 2.0 G.P.A. to take Gavilan College Classes
Progress Probation:

(a) On the first progress report date of the semester a student with a GPA below 2.5 in high school core classes will receive a written academic warning.

(b) At the second progress report date of the semester a student with a high school core classes GPA below 2.5 will be given a preliminary academic probation contract.

(c) At the end of the first semester a student with a cumulative GPA in high school core classes below 2.5 will be placed on academic probation.

(d) Students with two consecutive semesters of below a 2.5 may/will be asked to withdraw.
*At the first and second academic probation periods, parents, teachers, and administrator may conference to discuss academic progress, contracts, and possible modification to schedule.
Removal from Probation: A student who is on academic probation for grade point deficiency shall be removed from probation when the student’s GPA in core high school classes is 2.5 or higher. GPA progress in core high school classes must be shown in the next semester. During the subsequent semester the two progress report periods must show a GPA of 2.5 or above.
Academic Standards for Dismissal: A student who is on academic probation shall be subject to dismissal from GECA if in 2 consecutive semesters their cumulative GPA in their high school core classes is less than 2.5. If a student withdraws from a college class that student MUST reenroll in the same class (college policy). In addition, if a student is dropped from a college class, s/he must report to the GECA counselor for placement in another high school class. Failure to do so will jeopardize placement the following semester in another college class.
College Standards for Dismissal:

A student who is on academic probation shall be subject to dismissal from the college if the student earned a cumulative grade point average of less than 2.0 in all units attempted in each of three consecutive semesters.

A student who has been placed on progress probation shall be subject to dismissal if the percentage of units in which the student has been enrolled for which entries of “W,” “I,” “NC” and "NP" are recorded in at least three consecutive semesters reaches or exceeds fifty percent (50%).

A student who has been dismissed may petition for reinstatement with a written petition. The petition will be reviewed by a counselor. A decision can include continued enrollment, continued enrollment with a reduced unit load for a predetermined period or dismissal from the college for a predetermined period of time. Petitions are available from the counselors and the Admissions and Records Office.

A student deficient in grade points who transfers to Gavilan College from another college will be admitted on probationary status and allowed to remain as long as a 2.0 or higher grade point average is maintained.

No grade or course will be removed from the student’s permanent record. However, the record will be annotated to show that the coursework for that term is not computed in the grade point average.


Required High School Summer School: Students receiving an “in danger of failing grade” (D) or a failing grade (F) in high school core classes at the 2nd progress report date during the semester will be required to attend summer school. At the 2nd progress report date conference, summer school attendance will be discussed for classes with grades of D or F regardless of GPA status.
Required GPA in high school core classes is 2.5 All students must maintain a cumulative GPA in high school core class at each semester of 2.5 or above. A student who fails to maintain a 2.5 or above GPA in high school core classes will not be allowed to register for Gavilan College courses, be eligible to participate in “out of school” activities such as neighboring school dances, etc.

Student Sexual Harassment

GECA is committed to providing a school environment free from sexual harassment for all students. Incidents of harassment should be reported in accordance with these procedures so school authorities may take appropriate action. Students who sexually harass others are subject to discipline up to and including dismissal.

Definition: Sexual harassment is any sexual advance, request or other conduct of a sexual nature, which is offensive. It includes, but it is not limited to, spoken or written words, physical behavior, offensive pictures and/or drawings, graffiti, and jokes. Sexual harassment will not be tolerated.

Reporting Procedures: Students who have experienced sexual harassment should report the incident to school authorities as soon as possible.
Public Display of Affection
In an effort to promote behavior which establishes a friendly atmosphere without causing others to feel embarrassment or discomfort, unacceptable are:
•   Prolonged or heavy kissing
•   Fondling/inappropriate sexual contact
•   Excessive body contact

Inappropriate Language
Appropriate language enhances mutual respect and raises the level of comfort necessary for students and staff to perform at their best.  The following misuse of written, spoken or gestured communication in any language is unacceptable:
•   Obscene or profane
•   Derogatory or racial, ethnic, religious, gender or sexual slurs intended to be hurtful or harassing in nature.

Medications

No student can be administered medications unless we have a written statement by the physician on file and the details of administration on the original pharmacy bottle; a note from a parent does not suffice. Even over-the-counter preparations such as aspirin, cold remedies etc. are considered medications and these procedures must be followed.

Computer Agreement


Before using school computers, students and parents must sign a GUSD Online Technology Agreement. Computers are for schoolwork only. Students will not play games, check e-mails, or go on inappropriate sites, or computer use will be denied.
Electronic Devices (cell phones, IPODS, etc.)

All electronic devices must be turned off during class time. Devices must be inside backpack or inside pants pocket. If a student is caught using these devices during class time, it will be taken away from the student. A parent will then have to pick it up in the office. After the 3rd time, phones will be held in the office until the last day of school.
Fees

By state law, students categorized as California residents are charged a per unit fee, regardless of the number of units in which they are enrolled. The fees for GECA students are waived by the college, but are still paid by the college – on behalf of the students – to the state in compliance with state law. As a requirement of their admission to the GECA, each student is required to fill out a Board of Governor’s Fee Waiver Application for each semester. A Student Representation Fee of $1.00 per semester also applies to all GECA students. All GECA students are encouraged to opt out of payment for “religious, political, financial, or moral” reasons. If they choose not to do so, then they are responsible for the $1.00 fee.

Student failing a class that would require a repeat of that same class will require a summer course to be taken (if offered) will be the sole responsibility of the parent and the student.
Dropped Courses

College courses may not be dropped after the third week of class without documentation on the high school transcript as a withdrawal/fail (w/f).


Incompletes
A student will be required to make up an incomplete within six weeks after the receipt of the incomplete grade.  If this incomplete grade is not removed within the time limit, the student will receive an “F” in the course.
Out of District High School/College Classes

Enrolled students who wish to take courses other than GECA’s high school courses or Gavilan’s courses must have them pre-approved before they can be accepted for credit.


Honor Code/Tribunal

Students actively participate in self-governance through two student-run bodies: Student Congress and Honor Tribunal. Student leaders are elected by their peers to serve on the Student Congress, which is charged with governing student clubs, planning school social events, and fund raising. The school is governed under a unique document known as The Honor Code of GECA, the basic tenets of which are honesty, personal integrity, accountability, and respect for diversity. It is this Honor Code that provides the framework for student behavior expectations, taking the distinctive nature of high school on a college campus into account. The Honor Tribunal serves as the hearing body for students who may have violated the Honor Code; the Honor Tribunal then deliberates and makes recommendations to the school principal in student disciplinary matters.


Student Drivers
Student Drivers and Parents:

• Parking at school is a privilege that can be revoked.

• Safety and accountability are primary concerns. All California Driving Laws must be followed; all school rules must be followed; students must arrive on time and attend all obligations.

• Parking on campus is a privilege. Only students who have Gavilan College parking passes may park on campus and only in Parking Lot C. All driving students must sign a contract regarding these conditions.


Driving to school is a responsibility as well as a privilege, and students who drive must commit to the following conditions:
All student-operated cars, motorcycles, or other motor vehicles must be properly licensed, registered, tagged, insured, and registered with the School office before they may be operated on Gavilan Campus.

  • Students are expected to arrive on time. Issues related to students being late to school will result in driving privileges being revoked.

  • No student may linger in the parking lot or in a parked car at any time. All cars should be locked and left as soon as they are parked in the school lot.

  • When operating a motor vehicle on campus, students should exercise particular care and use in the slowest possible rate of speed, particularly at times of arrival and dismissal.

  • School buses and pedestrians always have the right-of-way on the campus.

  • Students may not operate a motor vehicle during the school day without permission from the Office.

  • At the time of dismissal, or any other time when there is a large group of students boarding, student drivers are expected to exercise caution and to leave campus without lingering.

  • The Administration may, for serious disciplinary breaches or misuse of an automobile or other motor vehicle by a student, restrict or forbid that student from driving a motor vehicle on Gavilan College Campus.

  • Students must report accidents and incidences of damage to a motor vehicle en route to school or on the school grounds to the Main Office as soon as possible.


Leaving Campus

GECA is a closed campus. Students must remain on campus from drop off to dismissal. Students who are leaving must wait for their parents. Parents must come to the office to request their student’s leave. A parent or identified adult listed on the student’s emergency card must sign students out in the office.


Parental Roles


Parents are expected to take an active role in supporting the academic, attendance and discipline policies of the school and the individual teachers. Parents are encouraged to call the school periodically to inquire about their child’s progress or sign up and access School Loop. Each parent is required to give at least 4 hours of volunteer work at the school.

Student Obligations


Students are expected to return textbooks and library books on the date they are due. The student is advised that the provisions of education Code 48904, authorizing the withholding of grades and diplomas will be enforced. Students who do not turn in their books by the assigned time, may lose placement in college course(s).

Loss/Damaged Books


Students are responsible for all textbooks and library books checked out to them and will be charged full replacement cost for books that have been lost or damaged beyond repair. Books that can be repaired will be assessed individually.
Dress Code

All students will wear clothing that is appropriate for an educational atmosphere, as well as safe for all

school activities. Certain types of clothing tend to

Impede the educational process, and are not allowed.

These include:

1. Obscene/profane T-shirts

2. Drug/alcohol/tobacco logos

3. Shirts with sleeves less than one inch wide

at the top, tube tops & halter tops

4. Bare midriffs

5. Excessively tight clothing

6. Gang-related clothing or items

7. Any article of clothing which allows

underwear to show.

8. Leggings or tights worn without shorts.

9. Shoes inappropriate for school activities.

10. Pajamas and slippers.

11. Shorts, skirts and dresses must be of a

reasonable length. When the child is standing with arms to the side and fingers extended, the shorts, skirts, or dresses must extend past the fingertips.

12. Males may not wear hats in the classroom. Females, if the hat is an accessory to the outfit (not a distraction/no ball caps), may be worn.


Attendance Policy
Absences not cleared within 3 days will be recorded as unexcused and may result in a truancy letter. Consequences will include parent notification. When a student has had verified absences due to illness equal to ten percent of the total school days for the current school year, each additional absence must be verified by a physician, school nurse, or other school personnel.

STUDENTS WHO ARE ABSENT ON THE DAY OF A SCHOOL ACTIVITY MAY NOT PARTICIPATE IN THAT EVENT.
Attendance Standards for Gavilan College
Students at Gavilan College are expected to attend all classes for which they are enrolled. Students missing one more class hour than the unit value for a particular course without making prior arrangements may, at the instructor’s option, be dropped without possibility of credit. Students who do not attend the first class session may be dropped from class in order to admit other students desiring to enroll. If it is necessary for a student to miss more than three consecutive class periods, a Leave of Absence Petition Form should be obtained from the Admissions and Records Office.

The petition must be approved by all the student’s instructors and returned to the Admissions and Records Office. Ordinarily, a petition for leave of absence will not be granted for more than two weeks. Prolonged absence, even when excused, may result in grade penalties, since the student is still responsible for course requirements.


Habitual Truants may be referred to the District School attendance Review Board (SARB) which may refer them to the Santa Clara County District Attorney
The Board of Trustees authorizes teachers to fail a student for missing more than 1/2 the classes within a quarter.

Truancy


Truancy occurs when a student willfully stays away from classes or school, generally without the parent or guardian’s knowledge.

Tardiness


Students will receive an unexcused tardy for being late to class. Continued tardiness will result in disciplinary action from the office.

Visitors
In order to ensure campus security and protection to students, enforcement of the campus policy regarding the presence of non-students on campus is strictly enforced. Students are not allowed to bring visitors to school.

Parents and guardians wishing to see or speak to a student during regular hours must check into the office first. Interruption of classes is not permitted. Parents entering to see and/or sign a student out of class must be prepared to present proper identification. Students may not be released to any person other than the parent/guardian without the parent/guardian's prior authorization. Contact the office directly should you need to speak to your student. Please do not call your student directly as cell phones should be off during class time.


Discipline Policies

Major Rules that may result in Suspension/Expulsion
According to Ed. Code Section 48900, a student may be suspended or recommended for expulsion if the superintendent or the principal determines that the student has committed one or more of the following acts while going to, during, or coming from school, at any school activity on or off campus, or during lunch:
1. Caused, attempted to cause, or threatened to cause physical injury to another person.

2. Possessed, sold, or otherwise furnished any firearm, knife, explosive, or other dangerous object. Note: A padlock is a “dangerous object.” 3. Unlawfully offered, arranged, or negotiated to sell any controlled substance listed in Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 11053) of Division 10 of the Health and Safety Code, an alcoholic beverage, or an intoxicant of any kind, and then either sold, delivered, or otherwise furnished to any person another liquid, substance, or material and represented the liquid, substance, or material as controlled substance, alcoholic beverage, or intoxicant.

4. Unlawfully possessed, used, sold, or otherwise furnished, or been under the influence of a controlled substance listed in Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 11053) of Division 10 of the Health and Safety Code, an alcoholic beverage, or an intoxicant of any kind.

5. Committed or attempted to commit robbery or extortion.

6. Caused or attempted to cause damage to school property or private property.

7. Possessed stolen or attempted to steal school property or private property.

8. Possessed or used tobacco, or any products containing tobacco or nicotine products, including, but not limited to, cigarettes, cigars, miniature cigars, clove cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, snuff, chew packets, and betel. However, this section does not prohibit use or possession by pupils of their own prescription products.

9. Committed an obscene act or engaged in habitual profanity or vulgarity.

10. Possessed or offered illegally, or was prepared to buy or sell drug or substance paraphernalia as defined in the section 11014.5 of the Health and Safety Code.

11. Disrupted school activities or otherwise willfully defied the valid authority of supervisors, teachers, administrators, school officials, or other school personnel engaged in the performance of their duties.

12. Knowingly received stolen school property or private property.

13. Possessed an imitation firearm. As used in this section, “imitation firearm” means a replica of a firearm that is as substantially similar in physical properties to an existing firearm as to lead a reasonable person to conclude that the replica is a firearm.

14. Attacking or threatening a district employee.

Note: Any student who accumulates a total of three days suspension (either on or off campus), will be immediately ineligible to school activities and may be recommended to be transferred back to their home school.



Course Offerings

English Department
English I (Honors)

English I Honors is a course designed for students who are capable of demonstrating exemplary performance in Language Arts and offers accelerated learning opportunities for students who have the motivation, interest, and ability to work at a rigorous pace. The course covers the same standards-based core works as English I, but at a much faster pace and in greater depth. Students will read fictional novels, short stories, and poems from a variety of genres. Essays, articles, and other non-fiction readings will be included in the curriculum. Students will be expected to follow a rigorous reading schedule, from which will follow comprehension quizzes/tests and KCS writing projects.


English II (Honors)

English II Honors is a course designed for students who are capable of demonstrating exemplary performance in Language Arts and offers accelerated learning opportunities for students who have the motivation, interest, and ability to work at a rigorous pace. The course covers the same standards-based core works as English II, but at a much faster pace and in greater depth and is designed to prepare students for the rigor of Advanced Placement Junior English.


AP English Language III

Advanced Placement English Language and Composition is a rigorous course that engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. The course teaches students to read primary and secondary sources carefully, to synthesize material from these texts in their own compositions, and to cite sources using conventions recommended by professional organizations such as the Modern Language Association (MLA). Essays, articles and other non-fiction readings are a staple of the course, but students will also read and respond to novels, short stories, and poems. Students are responsible for exam fees. However, there may be some reduction of fees based on income. Students scoring a “3” or better may earn college credit for the course. (please check specific policies at the college/university of choice)
AP English Literature IV

AP English Literature and Composition course engages students in th careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes as well as such small-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Writing assignments will be assigned to increase students’ ability to explain clearly, cogently, even elegantly, what they understand about literary works and why they interpret them as they do. Students are responsible for exam fees. However, there may be some reduction of fees based on income. Students scoring a “3” or better may earn college credit for the course. (please check specific policies at the college/university of choice)


Mathematics Department
Algebra I (Honors)

This is the study of the properties of the real number system which leads to the solution of equations and inequalities. Emphasis is placed on functions, both linear and quadratic. Exponents, radicals, polynomial and rational functions, sets, problem solving techniques, and applications are included.


Geometry (Honors)

This course emphasizes geometric thinking through the use of geometric proofs. Students will understand mathematical thinking from postulates and develop theorems. This course includes applications and constructions, but proofs are the major emphasis of this course.


Algebra II (Honors)

This course is an advanced algebra course. Topics include: complex numbers, logarithms, conic sections, combinations and permutation, proof by induction, arithmetic and geometric series. This course is required as the minimum mathematics course completed for admission to most four-year colleges. Students should carefully consider the prerequisites before signing up for this course.


Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus, Calculus, Statistics taken at Gavilan College
Physical Education

9th grade P.E.

This course is a high school requirement for all students in grade 9. A second year (10 credits) is required between grades 10-12.


Social Science Department
Geography/Global Studies (Honors)

The course is designed for students who are capable of demonstrating exemplary performance in Social Studies. Students must have the motivation, interest, and ability to work at a rigorous pace. Students will be expected to demonstrate critical thinking skills, and depth, complexity, and creativity for academic success. Students will write essays, research papers, and current event articles throughout the year.


AP World History

AP World History is designed for students who are capable of demonstrating exemplary performance in Social Studies. Students must have the motivation, interest, and ability to work at a rigorous pace. Students will be expected to demonstrate critical thinking skills, depth and complexity and creativity for academic success. Students are asked to write essays, research papers throughout the year. Students will also be expected to read books, primary sources and other materials in addition to their textbook throughout the course.

U.S. History AP

This course is a comprehensive study of United States history from colonization to the present. An emphasis will be placed on critical thinking and interpretation of historical documents in order to formulate opinions and conclusions about political, social, economic, and cultural events.



AP Government

AP Government is an in-depth study of the US Government. The course covers foundations of government in the United States, political, participation, institutions and civil rights and liberties. AP Government will prepare students to take the national AP Examination in the first full week of May. Students who pass this exam with a credible score may earn credit and/or advanced standing in Political Science at their colleges.


AP Economics

The AP course in Macroeconomics is designed to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. Such a course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determination and also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth and international economics. AP Economics will prepare students to take the national AP Examination in the first full week of May.

Non-Departmental Electives

Teacher’s Aide (T.A.) (non college prep)
Leadership (non college prep) Prerequisites-Interview by instructor and 3.0 GPA.
Students will learn a variety of leadership skills and complete a leadership project. In addition, students will participate in the planning and organization of school activities. Students must be willing to spend time outside of the class period to receive credit for the class.
AVID

AVID is a subject to assist students at each grade level to assist in the overview; tools/strategies to arrange class materials; goal-setting tools/strategies; collegiate options; four-year college admissions requirements; and self-advocacy.


Math Support

This course is not a college prep/not math credit course to support students in course readiness and understanding.




Writers Workshop

Early College programs associated with the California Community College Foundation (CCCF) require English teachers to participate in The College-readiness Performance Assessment System (C-PAS). Writer’s Workshop, through C-PAS, is designed to track students’ development of the Key Cognitive Strategies (KCS) that are critical thinking skills necessary for college-readiness and success.


Since the fall of 2006, the Educational Policy Improvement Center (EPIC) has partnered with the Urban Assembly (UA) to develop the C-PAS. Through extensive research, Dr. David Conley, CEO of EPIC, identified five KCS necessary for college-readiness:

  1. Problem Solving

  2. Research

  3. Interpretation

  4. Reasoning

  5. Precision

C-PAS is designed to measure the KCS through both rich performance tasks that teachers embed within existing curricula, aligned with curricular requirements – the California State Standards, and all writing projects students complete throughout their English Honors I course. It is designed to be a powerful tool to help guide and inform teachers’ efforts to prepare students for post-secondary success. This system is designed to help all students, regardless if current academic skill level, develop the thinking skills necessary for future success



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Gilroy Early College Academy Contact Information

Main Office (PB-17) 846-4909

Linda Martinez Secretary 846-4909

MaryAnn Boylan Principal 848-4749

Marcy Ratliff Counselor 848-4795



Gilroy Unified District Office 847-2700

Staff e-mail:

Treva Boyce English tboyce@gavilan.edu

James Corcoran Social Science jcorcoran@gavilan.edu

Pat Gomez Mathematics pgomez@gavilan.edu

Deidre Gonzalez AP Biology deidre.gonzalez@gusd.k12.ca.us

Charla Mittman English cmittman@gavilan.edu

Sam Navarez Social Science snavarez@gavilan.edu

Sonia Cichon English/AVID sonia.cichon@gusd.k12.ca.us

Laura Rigby Mathematics lrigby@gavilan.edu

Colleen Sanchez PE colleen.sanchez@gusd.k12.ca.us
Dr. TJ Owens

Be Someone. Go Somewhere. Seek Excellence.”


Student/Parental Advisement Form

I have reviewed the Handbook and understand the guidelines of Dr. T.J. Owens Gilroy Early College Academy (GECA). I

understand that I/my student will be held accountable for these guidelines and will accept appropriate consequences if inappropriate choices are made.

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Student Name (please print) Date

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Student Signature

I have reviewed the Handbook with my student and understand the guidelines of Dr. T.J. Owens Gilroy Early College Academy

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Parent Name (please print) Date


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Parent Signature



Please sign and return upon review of the Handbook. A signature must be on file for the

student to participate in any extra curricular activities including dances, sports, field trips and

any other scheduled events.


Gavilan College Campus Map





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