Dese model Curriculum



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DESE Model Curriculum

GRADE LEVEL/UNIT TITLE: 6/Friendship Course Code: ELA




COURSE INTRODUCTION: When students enter 6th grade, they should already have a solid foundation in literature and other subject areas and should be able to read and write fluently. They begin to explore deeper and subtler themes across reading, writing, speaking and listening. In reading, students will cite evidence to support analysis of both literature and informational text, determine central idea and theme, and create an objective summary. Additionally, students will use context clues to determine meaning, will analyze the overall text structure, and will explain how the author’s point of view or purpose is conveyed. In a variety of genres, students will evaluate arguments from specific claims and compare/contrast various author’s crafts. Students will integrate information in varied formats using media. In writing, students will use the writing process and conventions to create varied works for multiple purposes. Students will write narratives to develop real or imaginary experiences or events, write informative/explanatory text to examine a topic, write an analysis of relevant content, and write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and evidence. Students will conduct short and extended research projects using print and digital resources. In speaking and listening, students will engage effectively in a wide range of collaborative discussions and present claims and findings in a logical sequence using evidence as support. In language, students will demonstrate an understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings as well as acquire and use accurately and effectively grade-appropriate general academic and domain specific vocabulary words. By the end of 6th grade, students are ready to study literature with complex and challenging themes.




UNIT DESCRIPTION:

The unit entitled Friendship contains three lengthy lessons. In the first lesson, the student will do a brief review of writing narrative text and will write two types of narrative texts. In the second lesson, the student will compare and contrast two texts (of differing genres) with a similar theme and use the results to write an essay that describes how the same theme is conveyed through particular details. In the third lesson, the student will write an informative/explanatory essay to examine a topic. The student will consider factors such as development, organization, style, purpose, and audience when writing the essay. Students will work collaboratively throughout the unit and will use technology to share information and ideas with others.



Diverse Learners

Strategies for meeting the needs of all learners including gifted students, English Language Learners (ELL) and students with disabilities can be found at http://www.dese.mo.gov/divimprove/curriculum/UD-Model-Curriculum-Introduction-Sheet.pdf. Resources based on the Universal Design for Learning principles are available at www.cast.org.

Provide Feedback

SUGGESTED UNIT TIMELINE: approximately 3 weeks

CLASS PERIOD (min.): 50 minutes daily


ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:

1. How do different genres approach similar themes and/or topics?

2. How is it possible to study a topic by analyzing relevant content?

3. Why is it essential to write with the purpose and audience in mind?

4. Why is it important to draw evidence from texts to support analysis, reflection, and research?

5. How do narratives differ from informational texts?






ESSENTIAL MEASURABLE LEARNING OBJECTIVES



CCSS LEARNING GOALS (Anchor Standards/Clusters)

CROSSWALK TO STANDARDS

GLEs/CLEs

PS

CCSS

OTHER

DOK

1. The student will explain how a theme or central idea of a text is conveyed through particular details.

R.2: Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize key supporting details and ideas.

R.2.C.6.b

R.1.H.6.b

R.1.H.6.i


3.5

RL.6.2




3

2. The student will compare and contrast texts in different forms or genres (e.g. stories and poems, historical novels and fantasy stories) in terms of their approaches to similar themes and topics.

R.9: Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches authors take.

R.1.I.6.a

R.2.C.6.c




1.6

RL.6.9




3

3. The student will write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and concepts and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

W.2: Write informative and explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through effective selection, organization and analysis of content.

W.3.A.6.a

W.2.B.6.a

W.2.A.6.a

W.2.A.6.b

W.2.C.6.a

W.2.C.6.b

W.2.B.6.b

W.2.D.6.a

W.2.D.6.b


2.1

W.6.2.a

W.6.2.b


W.6.2.c

W.6.2.d


W.6.2.e

W.6.2.f





2

4. The student will produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience.

W.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience.

W.2.A.6.a

W.2.A.6.b



2.1

W.6.4




2

5. The student will use a writing process of planning, rough draft, editing and revising, rewriting to write narrative text.

W.5: Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

W.3: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective techniques, well-chosen details and well-structured event sequences.



W.1.A.6.a

W.1.A.6.b

W.1.A.6.c

W.1.A.6.d

W.1.A.6.e

W.2.A.6.a

W.2.A.6.b

W.2.C.6.a

W.2.C.6.b

W.2.D.6.a

W.2.D.6.b

W.3.A.6.a





2.1

W.6.5

W.6.3.a


W.6.3.b

W.6.3.c


W.6.3.d

W.6.3.e





2

3


6. In writing, the student will draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

W.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

W.3.A.6.a

W.3.A.6.b




2.1

W.6.9.a






2

3


ASSESSMENT DESCRIPTIONS*:

Formative Assessment 1: Using the Writing Process to Write Narratives: Students will use the writing process to write a narrative essay to describe a make-believe event about two friends. Student Prompt: “Friends share many experiences. These shared experiences may be fun, exciting or even challenging. Write a make-believe narrative about a shared experience between two friends.” Students should create a plan prior to writing, self-edit and ask a peer for suggestions, revise and rewrite and publish the last draft paper on the classroom Wiki, Blog, or Website. (Objectives 4 and 5)
Formative Assessment 2: Using Evidence from Text Comparison to Write Essay: Writing Practice: Students will work with a partner to compare and contrast a story and drama (with a common theme) about how friends help each other in time of illness and complete a Same Theme/Different Genre Comparison Chart. Pairs will use the information from the chart to write a compare/contrast essay. (Objectives 1, 2 and 6)
Formative Assessment 3: Writing Informative/Explanatory Essays: Writing Practice: Students will work with one other person to respond to a writing prompt to write an informative/explanatory essay about friendship. Student Prompt: “All the definitions and facts do not convey what friendship is really all about. The only way to truly understand friendship is to experience it firsthand. Write an informative essay that explains the true meaning of friendship.” (Objectives 3 and 4)

Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES (research-based): (Teacher Methods)

4

5


Lesson 1: Using the Writing Process to Write Narratives:

1. Advance Organizer: The teacher will activate prior knowledge by asking two questions: 1) What are two types of narratives? 2) How are narratives usually structured or organized? Have students share ideas with one other person and with the class. The teacher will clarify/add to students’ ideas.

2. Assessment for Learning: State the objective in student friendly terms. “In this lesson you will review how to write narrative papers and will use the writing process to write narratives about real events and make-believe events.”

3. Direct Teaching: Review the meaning of personal narratives and imaginative narratives and the parts of narrative essays. Define and discuss the concepts of development, organization, style, purpose, and audience and share a process that may be used to write narrative essays. Narrative Writing Tutorial: http://www.iss.k12.nc.us/writing/default.htm; Description of Personal Narrative: http://www.iss.k12.nc.us/writing/desc_p.htm; Description of Imaginative Narrative: http://www.iss.k12.nc.us/writing/desc_i.htm; Parts of a Narrative: http://www.iss.k12.nc.us/writing/pos_i.htm; Transition Words for Narratives: http://www.iss.k12.nc.us/writing/transitional.htm;

4. Share Scoring Criteria/Examine Exemplar Papers: Share the Narrative Scoring Guide and discuss the criteria that will be used to score the essays with students, and ask students to work in small groups to score several essays using the scoring criteria. Sample narrative essays: Sample personal Narratives: http://www.iss.k12.nc.us/writing/sample_p.htm; Sample Imaginative Narratives: http://www.iss.k12.nc.us/writing/sample_i.htm;

5. Share and Discuss Results: Ask students to share and discuss results of essay scoring with the class.

6. Writing Practice: Ask each student to respond to a writing prompt to write a narrative essay to describe a time in his/her life when he/she could have used the help of a friend. Student Prompt: “There are times in people’s lives when they need help. Think of a time in your life when you could have used the help of a friend or another person. Write a narrative essay that tells about a time in your life when you needed help from a friend or another person.” Students should create a plan prior to writing.

7. Assessment for Learning: When finished, have the students evaluate their essays using the Narrative Scoring Guide.

8. Peer Edit/Input: Ask students to exchange essays and evaluate another student’s essay and write suggestions for improvement. When finished, have students return essays for review and revision. All students will revise essays based on self-evaluation results and peer suggestions.

9. Using Technology to Collaborate: Ask students to post their revised essays on the classroom Wiki or Blog and comment on two other essays.

10. Formative Assessment 1: Using the Writing Process to Write Narratives: Ask each student to respond to a writing prompt to write a narrative essay to describe a make-believe event about two friends. Student Prompt: “Friends share many experiences. These shared experiences may be fun, exciting or even challenging. Write a make-believe narrative about a shared experience between two friends.” Students should create a plan prior to writing, self-edit and ask a peer for suggestions, revise and rewrite and publish the last draft paper on the classroom Wiki, Blog, or Website.


Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES: ( What Students Do)

4

5


Lesson 1: Using the Writing Process to Write Narratives:

1. Answer two questions. 1) What are two types of narratives? 2) Explain how are narratives are usually structured or organized. Share ideas with a classmate.

2. In this lesson you will review how to write narrative papers and will use the writing process to write a narrative about a real event and make-believe event.

3. Work with your teacher and classmates to review the meaning of personal narratives and imaginative narratives, the parts of narrative essays and the characteristics of quality written narratives.

4. Learn how narratives will be scored by reviewing and discussing the Narrative Scoring Guide. Work with your classmates to score several essays using the scoring criteria.

5. Share and discuss the results of essay scoring with your teacher and classmates.

6. Respond to a writing prompt to write a narrative essay. Student Prompt: “There are times in people’s lives when they need help. Think of a time in your life when you could have used the help of a friend or another person. Write a narrative essay that tells about a time in your life when you needed help from a friend or another person.” Students should create a plan prior to writing.

7. Evaluate your essay using the Narrative Scoring Guide.

8. Exchange essays with another person. Evaluate each other’s essay using the Narrative Scoring Criteria. Write suggestions for improvement. Return the essay to the writer for review and revision. Revise your essay based on self-evaluation results and peer suggestions.

9. Post your last draft essay on the classroom Wiki, Blog or website and comment on two other essays.

10. Take the Formative Assessment.


Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES: (research-based): (What Teachers Do)

1

2

6

Lesson 2: Using Evidence from Text Comparison to Write Essay

1. Advance Organizer: To provide a focus for learning and activate prior knowledge, ask students to complete a KWL Chart.

2. Assessment for Learning: State the objective in student friendly terms. “In this lesson you will make comparisons between different forms of texts with similar themes or topics and will use those results to answer higher-level questions, complete a chart, and write a comparison essay.”

3. Direct Teaching: Briefly review the meaning of theme, central idea, and universal theme/topic with students. The following source may prove helpful if students need an in-depth review of the concept of theme. http://www.readworks.org/lessons/grade4/theme/lesson-1

4. Modeling: Model for students how to compare and contrast a story and drama related to the topic of friendship and how to use the Same Theme/Different Genre Comparison Chart. The story is called Jack and Annie and is located on website: http://www.helium.com/items/742069-short-stories-friendship-stories-for-children. The drama is called King Arthur and the Witch and can be found on the website: http://www.kidsinco.com/2009/02/king-arthur-and-the-witch/

5. Guided Practice with a Partner: Ask students to work with a partner to compare and contrast a story and drama about the theme of friends helping each other in time of illness and to complete a Same Theme/Different Genre Comparison Chart. The story is about Penny and Beatrice and is located on website: http://www.helium.com/items/1946436-childrens-story-cancer-birthday?page=2. The drama is called Alien Friends and can be found on the website: http://www.kidsinco.com/2010/02/two-alien-friends/.

6. Cooperative Learning Structure: Ask each pair to join with two other pairs. The three pairs will use Round Robin Sharing (KAGAN) http://www.horseheadsdistrict.com/ir/kagan/s31.htm to share the information from their Same Theme/Different Genre Comparison Charts from Step 5. Ask students to add to their charts as they hear additional ideas from other pairs. Volunteers from each of the Round-Robin Sharing groups will share ideas with the entire class, and students will add additional ideas to their charts.

7. Direct Teaching: Prior to having students use information from their comparison charts to create a compare/contrast essay, the teacher may want to review the process for writing comparison essays. Websites: http://writingcenter.unc.edu/resources/handouts-demos/specific-writing-assignments/comparing-and-contrasting: http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~wricntr/documents/CompAnalysis.html; http://depts.washington.edu/pswrite/compare.html; http://www.essaywritinghelp.com/compareandcontrast.htm

8. Exemplar Papers: Prior to students’ writing their comparison essays, show students examples of essays written for the purpose of comparing and contrasting literary works. Discuss the characteristics of the papers and ask students to critique two or three papers.

9. Writing Practice: Ask students to work with a partner and use the information from the Same Theme/Different Genre Comparison Chart created in Step 5, to write a compare and contrast essay.

10. Student Self-Evaluation: Upon completion of the essay, have student pairs exchange and critique other papers using the Compare/Contrast Essay Rubric. Essays should be returned to writers for revisions.

11. Using Technology to Collaborate: Have students post their revised essays on the classroom Wiki or Blog and comment on two other essays.




Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES: (What Students Do)

1

2

6

Lesson 2: Using Evidence from Text Comparison to Write Essay

1. Complete a KWL Chart.

2. In this lesson, you will make comparisons between different forms of texts with similar themes or topics and use those results to answer questions, complete charts, and write a comparison essay.

3. Briefly review with your teacher the meaning of theme, central idea, and universal theme.

4. Listen and watch as your teacher models how to compare and contrast a story and drama related to the topic of friendship and learn how to use the Same Theme/Different Genre Comparison Chart.

5. Work with a partner to compare and contrast a story and drama about the theme of friends helping each other in time of illness and complete a Same Theme/Different Genre Comparison Chart. The story is about Penny and Beatrice and is located on website: http://www.helium.com/items/1946436-childrens-story-cancer-birthday?page=2. The drama is called Alien Friends and can be found on the website: http://www.kidsinco.com/2010/02/two-alien-friends/.

6. Join with two other pairs. Use Round Robin Sharing (KAGAN) to share the information from the Same Theme/Different Genre Comparison Chart from Step 5. Add to your chart as you hear additional ideas from other pairs. Volunteers from each of the Round-Robin Sharing groups will share ideas with the entire class and you will add additional ideas to your chart.

7. Work with your teacher and classmates to: review the process for writing comparison essays, review sample compare/contrast essays and discuss the characteristics of the papers.

9. Work with a partner and use the information from the Same Theme/Different Genre Comparison Chart created in Step 5, to write a compare and contrast essay.

10. Upon completion of the essay, exchange and critique other papers using the Compare/Contrast Essay Rubric. Then revise your essay based on suggestions.

11. Post your revised essay on the classroom Wiki or Blog and comment on two other essays.


Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES (research-based): (Teacher Methods)

3

4

Lesson 3: Writing Informative/Explanatory Essays:

1. Advance Organizer: The teacher will activate prior knowledge by asking two questions: 1) What is informative writing and when is it used? 2) What is explanatory writing and when is it used? Have students share ideas with one other person and with the class.

2. Assessment for Learning: State the objective in student friendly terms. “In this lesson you will write informative/explanatory texts/essays in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience.”

3. Direct Teaching: Review the meaning of informative/explanatory texts/essays and the parts of informative/explanatory essays. Define and discuss the concepts of development, organization, style, purpose, and audience and share a process that may be used to write informative/explanatory essays. Websites: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/685/02/; http://www.ehow.com/how_5880410_write-explanatory-essay.html; http://www.tailoredessays.com/how-write/explanatory-essay.htm; http://www.tailoredessays.com/how-write/informative-essay.htm

4. Share Scoring Criteria/Examine Exemplar Papers: Share the Informative/Explanatory Scoring Guide that will be used to score the essays with students, and ask students to work in small groups to score several essays using the scoring criteria. Sample essays:

http://www.thewritesource.com/studentmodels/ws2k-musiced.htm;

http://www.thewritesource.com/studentmodels/ws2k-phoneed.htm;

http://www.thewritesource.com/studentmodels/ws2k-bestgirl.htm;

http://www.thewritesource.com/studentmodels/ws2k-summer.htm;

http://www.thewritesource.com/studentmodels/ws2k-cheated.htm;

http://www.thewritesource.com/studentmodels/ws2k-pawpaw.htm;

http://www.thewritesource.com/studentmodels/ws2k-friendship.htm;

5. Share and Discuss Results: Ask students to share and discuss results of essay scoring with the class.

6. Writing Practice: Ask students to work with one other person to respond to a writing prompt to write an informative/explanatory essay about friendship. Student Prompt: “All the definitions and facts do not convey what friendship is really all about. The only way to truly understand friendship is to experience it firsthand. Write an informative essay that explains the true meaning of friendship.”

7. Assessment for Learning: When finished, have the pairs evaluate their essays using the Informative/Explanatory Scoring Guide.

8. Peer Edit/Input: Ask pairs to exchange essays and evaluate another pair’s essay and write suggestions for improvement. When finished, pairs will return essays for review and revision. All pairs will revise essays based on self-evaluation results and peer suggestions.

9. Using Technology to Collaborate: Ask students to post their revised essays on the classroom Wiki or Blog and comment on two other essays.


Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES: (What Students Do)

3

4

Lesson 3: Writing Informative/Explanatory Essays:

1. Answer two questions: 1) What is informative writing and when is it used? 2) What is explanatory writing and when is it used? Share ideas with one other person and with the class.

2. In this lesson you will write informative/explanatory texts/papers in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience.

3. With your teacher and classmates discuss the concepts of development, organization, style, purpose, and audience and a process that may be used to write informative/explanatory essays.

4. Work with a small group and use Informative/Explanatory Scoring Guide to score the several essays. Discuss and share scoring results with classmates.

5. Work with one other person to write an informative/explanatory essay about friendship. Student Prompt: “All the definitions and facts do not convey what friendship is really all about. The only way to truly understand friendship is to experience it firsthand. Write an informative essay that explains the true meaning of friendship.”

6. When finished, evaluate your essay using the Informative/Explanatory Scoring Guide.

7. Exchange papers with another pair, evaluate their essay, and write suggestions for improvement.

8. Revise your essay based on your self-evaluation and suggestions from peers.

9. Post your revised essay on the classroom Wiki or Blog and comment on two other essays.



UNIT RESOURCES: (include internet addresses for linking)
Drama About Friendship

http://www.kidsinco.com/2009/12/the-grasshopper-and-the-frog/

http://www.kidsinco.com/2010/01/friends/
Compare and Contrast Interactive Map

http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/interactives/compcontrast/map.html
How to Write All Types of Essays

http://www.tailoredessays.com/how-write

Sample Prompts for Personal Narratives

http://www.iss.k12.nc.us/writing/prompts_p.htm
Sample Prompts for Imaginative Narratives

http://www.iss.k12.nc.us/writing/prompts_i.htm







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