Database Searching: How to Find Journal Articles?



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Database Searching: How to Find Journal Articles?

  • START
  • Edit by: Dr. Mostafa Hassnin
  • Library and Information Technology
  • Mass Communication and Information Science Dept.
  • Ft_mostafa@qu.edu.qa

I. Understanding Online Databases

  • What are online databases?
  • Online databases are Web-based electronic indexes that enable you to locate and retrieve articles in magazines, journals and newspapers.
  • NEXT

Types of Databases

  • Multidisciplinary (Comprehensive) vs. Subject Specific Database coverage may be comprehensive e.g., Academic Search Premier , or on a particular subject, e.g., ABI/Inform Global.
  • Full text vs. Citation only
  • A database may contain full text articles or only citations.
  • NEXT

II. Finding the Right Database(s) for Your Research Topic

  • What databases are available from the Library?
  • Which databases are comprehensive and may be the best place to start searching?
  • http://www.qu.edu.qa/home/libraries/ejournals.htm
  • Which specialized database is appropriate for my subject-oriented research?
  • http://www.qu.edu.qa/home/libraries/edatabase.htm
  • NEXT

What databases are available from the Library?

  • The library subscribes to a number of online databases which cover various subjects. Remote access allows you to search off campus.
  • Click By Title or By Subject or By Provider on the Library Homepage to get a database list with descriptions and access information.
  • NEXT

Which databases are comprehensive?

  • Academic Search Premier ,
  • Wilson Omni File
  • &
  • InfoTrac OneFile*
  • Why should you start with one of the above ?
    • They cover nearly all subject areas or disciplines.
    • They provide a large number of full-text journal articles.
    • They let you limit your search to scholarly journals.
  • NEXT

Which specialized database is appropriate for my subject-oriented research?

  • You may select a specialized database from the list By Subject.
  • When you browse the list and select an online database, consider the following questions:
    • Which database covers my research subject? 
    • Can I get full text articles?  
    • Can I limit the search to scholarly journal articles?
    • What other sources are available ? 
  • For example:
  • NEXT

You are doing research on an Business topic:

  • NEXT
  • Electronic Database
  • Database
  • Subject
  • Web Address
  • ABI/Inform Global
  • Business/Economics
  • proquest.umi.com/login
  • ABI/Inform Global
  • Business/Economics
  • proquest.umi.com/login
  • Helecon Scima
  • Economics
  • helecon.hkkk.fi/?&lang=eng
  • Engineering Village2
  • (Compendex & Inspec)
  • Engineering
  • www.engineeringvillage2.org
  • IEEEXPLORE
  • Engineering
  • ioj.iee.org.uk

Business Periodical Full Text

  • ABI/INFORM Global
    • Offer the most current peer reviewed titles
    • More image content offering complete access to important charts, graphs, tables.
    • Deep Backfile to 86 with median title starting in 93.
  • Gale Business Resource Ctr
    • ABI includes over 300 active full titles not available from Gale
    • As with the unique indexing offered by Gale, much of its unique full text is news, trade and industry content.
  • Ebsco Business Source Premier
    • ABI offers full text for nearly 300 titles not available from Ebsco.
    • As with the unique indexing offered by Ebsco, much of its unique full text is news, trade and industry content.
    • Shallow file starting in 90 with median title starting in 95.
  • Based on Title List as of January 2001

III. Locating & Retrieving Relevant Articles

  • Each database has its own search interface and capabilities. Many of the basic search concepts and features are similar:
      • Keyword searching
      • Limiters
      • Boolean operators
  • What are some common searching problems and solutions?
  • Where can you find more assistance for some of the library’s databases?
  • NEXT

Keyword Searching

  • Keyword searching is the easiest search method, but may be less precise.
  • Databases collect, sort and present information according to FIELDS (which are usually found in a dropdown menu), such as:
  • To make your search more specific, you may select one or more fields to do keyword search.
  • To expand your search, you may search for keyword(s) in All basic or Default fields.
  • NEXT

Limiters

  • Limiters are database functions that let you narrow your search results.
  • Database limiters may include:
      • Scholarly (Peer Reviewed)
      • Publication year
      • Full text
      • Language, etc.
  • NEXT

Boolean Operator: AND

  • AND links words or phrases that must both appear in the same article.
  • If you what to focus your search results, use Boolean operator AND to connect additional word(s)
  • Example: computer and teaching -- finds both computer and teaching anywhere in the same article.
  •  
  • NEXT

Boolean Operator: OR

  • OR links synonyms, alternative forms of expression, acronyms, and so on.
  • If you want to expand your search, use Boolean operator OR to connect additional word(s).
  • Example: first grade or elementary school -- finds either first grade or elementary school in the same article.
  • NEXT
  • You can use a proximity search to search for two or more words that occur within a specified number of words (or fewer) of each other in the databases. Proximity searching is used with a keyword or Boolean search.
  • The proximity operators are composed of a letter (N or W) and a number (to specify the number of words). The proximity operator is placed between the words that are to be searched, as follows:
  •          Near Operator (N) - N5 finds the words if they are within five words of one another regardless of the order in which they appear.
  • For example, type tax N5 reform to find results that would match tax reform as well as reform of income tax.
  •          Within Operator (W) - In the following example, W8 finds the words if they are within eight words of one another and in the order in which you entered them.
  • For example, type tax W8 reform to find results that would match tax reform but would not match reform of income tax.

Common Searching Problems & Solutions (I)

  • 1. Citation list is too long
    • Narrow your search using additional terms connected by AND;
    • Limit your search by limiter functions;
    • Try to find the official descriptor or subject heading that matches your keyword(s) in the thesaurus or subject index provided by the database.
  • NEXT

Common Searching Problems & Solutions (II)

  • 2. No citations
    • Check the spelling of your search terms;
    • Eliminate one or more of your search terms;
    • Don’t fill in every empty text box or drop-down menu choice;
    • Try to find the official descriptor or subject heading that matches your topic;
    • Make sure appropriate database is used;
    • Call (???) to ask a reference librarian for assistance.
  • NEXT
  • InfoTrac OneFile vs. the Competition

Search techniques

  • Click for the instruction on searching Academic Search Premier of EBSCOHost.
  • Click for the instruction on InfoTrac OneFile.
  • Click for the instruction on ABI/Inform
  • NEXT
  • E-Books
  • ebrary database
  • http://site.ebrary.com/lib/qataru
  • have more than 60,000 online, full-text books.
  • NetLibrary Database
  • http://www.netlibrary.com/
  • More than 100,000 titles and hundreds of global publishers
  • http://www.netlibrary.com/Search/AdvancedSearch.asp
  • All sources of information that you use in your research must be cited, including information found on the Web. 
  • How to Cite Electronic Resources?
  • Choosing the Right Style Manual
  • Your may require that you use a specific style guide to cite sources in your research papers, footnotes, and bibliographies.
  • Style Manuals
  • Chicago Style (University of Chicago Press)
  • IEEE Standards Style (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers)
  • IEEE Standards Style (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers)
  • MLA (Modern Language Association)
  • Below are links to sample citations using standard basic style guides
  • Examples
  • MLA style
  • Format :  Author.  "Article title."  Journal Title  Volume (Date): Pages.  Database.  Vendor.  Date of access. 
  • Example:  Lehrer, Eli.  "Cities Combat Violent Crime." Insight on the News  15 (July 19, 1999): 14.   Expanded Academic Index ASAP.  Gale Group.  October, 5, 1999.  http://infotrac.galegroup.com/itweb/iastu_main
  • 2- Full-text article from an electronic Reference database
  • Format:   "Title of article." Title of Source.  Version or Edition.  Date of Update.  Publisher.  Date of Access.  URL.
  • Example:  "Civil Rights Movement."  Encyclopædia Britannica Online.  Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc.  October 5,1999 http://search.eb.com/bol/topic?eu=84948&sctn=1
  • Examples
  • MLA style
  • 3- Full-Text Report or Book from an electronic database
  • Format:  Title.  Author.  Date.  Name of database.  Date of Access.  URL.
  • Example:  Annual Report on School Safety, 1998.  U.S. Department of Education.  October 1998.  Congressional Information Service, Inc. American Statistics Index.  October 6,1999.  http://web.lexis-nexis.com/statuniv/
  • 4- Professional Site
  • Format:  Page Title.  Author.  Date of Last Update.  Sponsor.  Date of Access.  URL.
  • Example: Institute for Information Literacy.  Mary Jane Petrowski.  August 3, 2000.  Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL).  October 15, 2000.  http://www.ala.org/acrl/nili/nilihp.html
  • http://pinetlibrary.com/citationmachine.net/index.php?mode=form&g=6&list=nonprint&cm=13
  • There are interactive web tools which helps teachers and students produce reference citations. Includes MLA and APA formats.
  • http://www.easybib.com/
  • Thank You
  • شكرا لكم


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