Curriculum Map Grade 8 Language Arts “Personal and Social Conflict” Year at a Glance



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Curriculum Map Grade 8 Language Arts

Personal and Social Conflict”


Year at a Glance

Timeframe

Unit Title/ Topic

Unit Big Idea

Reading Novel/Other

Writing Genre/ Other

Semester I

Quarter 1



(9 weeks)

Us vs. Them

Regardless of background, all people share commonalities such as hardship, loss, fear and love

The Outsiders

Persuasive Writing

Quarter 2

(9 weeks)

Point of View

Wisdom is born from experience and perspective

My Brother Sam is Dead

Expository Writing

  • Newspaper article

Narrative Writing

  • Diary Entry

  • Friendly Letter

Persuasive Writing

Mock Trial



Semester II

Quarter 3



(5 weeks)

Finding Your Voice

Certain symbols in the story represent the main character

Speak

Business Letter

Expository Writing

Oral Presentation


Quarter 3

(1 week)

Healthy Choices

Personal decision making contributes to emotional and physical well-being

Sex Education/ Science integration

Group discussion

Personal Journaling



Quarter 3/4

(6 weeks)

Fictionalizing Conflict and Resolution

Literary devices enhance and deepen fiction’s impact upon the reader

Short Story

  • The Mexican

  • To Light a Fire

  • The Lottery

  • An Incident at Owl Creek Bridge

  • One of These Days

  • Lamb to the Slaughter

  • Various Sherlock Holmes short stories

Narrative Writing:

  • Short Story- Murder Mystery




Quarter 4

(8 weeks)

Courage

Standing up for what is right is often difficult and even dangerous


To Kill a Mockingbird







Topic: Us vs. Them

Big Idea: Regardless of background, all people share commonalities such as hardship, loss, fear and love

Novel: The Outsiders

Quarter: 1, 7 weeks

Weeks: 8

Essential

Questions

  • What is a family?

  • What is more influential, nature or nurture?

  • What is an outsider?

Enduring

Understanding

  • A family can be defined in many ways

  • Heredity and social class are not the only factors that determine success in life

  • Labels do not define who you are

Standards

Reading:

RL: 1.1, 2.2, 3.3, 4.4, 6.6, 7.7, 10.10



Writing:

1.1a, 1.1b, 1.1c, 1.1c, 1.1d, 1.1e, 4.4, 4.5, 9.9a, 10.10



Speaking and Listening

1.1 a, 1.1b, 1.1c, 1.1d, 4.4, 6.6



Language

1.1b, 1.1c, 1.1d, 2.2a, 2.2c, 3.3a, 4.4a, 4.4b, 4.4c, 4.4d, 5.5a, 5.5b, 5.5c, 6.6



Skills

  • Compare and contrast the novel to the movie

  • Summarize similarities and differences between Socs & Greasers

  • Infer theme using evidence from the novel

  • Diagram character attributes using evidence from the novel

  • Analyze conflict and resolution using evidence from the novel

  • Summarize reading

  • Relate personal experiences and knowledge gathered from interview to the novel

  • Compose novel sentences using vocabulary words demonstrating understanding of definition

Assessments

Formative

  • literary analysis- flashback

  • T-chart Socs vs. Greasers

  • literary analysis- theme

  • literary analysis- conflict and resolution

  • Venn Diagram- similarities/differences in movie

  • Writer’s Journal

  • Reader’s Response

Summative

  • The Outsiders on film- HO

  • Final Essay

Activities

  • Group work- what is a stereotype?

  • Novel preview/active reading strategies

  • Watch movie Grease

  • Parent Interview- being a teenager

  • Anatomy of a juvenile Gang- HO

  • “Nothing Gold Can Stay”- symbolism

  • Character Map

  • Watch movie The Outsiders

  • Daily writing prompts

  • “We Can Work it Out”- writing about theme

Assessed Vocabulary

Hermit

Aloofness

Gallantly

Hesitation

Elfish

Ligament



Incredulous

Rebellious

Sideburns

Turf


Reeling

Smoldering

Wince

Boxcar


Bleak

Imploringly (adj)

Sullenly (adj)

Moral (n)

Charity (n)

Suspicion (n)

Casual (adj)

Conform (v)

Ruefully (adj)

Quiver (v)

Mimic (v)

Ashamed (adj)

Exploit (n)

Resemblance (n)

Reputation (n)

Underprivileged (adj)


Billfold

Faint (adj.)

Suspicious (adj)

Unconscious (adj)

Embers (n)

Elude (v)

Hardened (adj)

Cinders (n)

Sob (v)

Inhalation (n)



Indignant (adj)

Vacant (adj)

Towhead (n)

Shanghai

Delinquent


Vaguely (adv)

Desert (v)

Corny (adj)

Acquitted (v)

Guardian (n)

Vacuum (n)

Quiver (v)

Reckless (adj)

Fender (n)

Idolized (v)

Ornery

Reformatory



Blood Feud

Discipline (n)

Convict (n)





Topic: Point of View

Big Idea: Wisdom is born from experience and perspective

Novel: My Brother Sam is Dead

Quarter: 2

Weeks: 8

Essential

Questions

  • Do the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few, or one?

  • Is war ever justified?

  • Should decision-making be based on logic or idealism and passion?

Enduring

Understanding

  • Sometimes individuals experience injustice in society’s pursuit of a greater good

  • Wars are fought both for glory and principle

  • Wise choices depend upon experience

Standards

Reading:

RL: 1.1, 2.2, 3.3, 4.4, 6.6, 10.10

RI: 7.7


Writing:

1.1a, 1.1b, 1.1c, 1.1c, 1.1d, 1.1e, 2.2a, 2.2b, 2.2c, 2.2d, 2.2e, 2.2f, 3.3a, 3.3b, 3.3c, 3.3d, 3.3e, 4.4, 5.5, 7.7, 9.9a, 10.10



Speaking and Listening

1.1 a, 1.1b, 1.1c, 1.1d, 5.5, 6.6,



Language

1.1b, 1.1c, 1.1d, 2.2a, 2.2c, 3.3a, 4.4a, 4.4b, 4.4c, 4.4d, 5.5a, 5.5b, 5.5c, 6.6



Skills

  • Predicting what will happen next in novel

  • Appraising main character actions; defend or criticize

  • Summarizing challenges main character faces

  • Illustrate main idea through a drawing

  • Prepare an argument for or against execution (of Sam)

  • Match vocabulary words to definition

  • Compose novel sentences using vocabulary words demonstrating understanding of definition

Assessments

Formative

  • Literature Circles discussions

  • Family letter

  • Diary entry

  • Newspaper clipping

  • Group Journal

Summative

  • Final Essay

  • Mock Trial reflection

Activities

  • Webquest- revolutionary war facts, historic sites and events

  • Graphic organizer- character traits and feelings

  • Letter writing

  • Diary entries

  • Artifact creation

  • Gallery Walk Exhibition for parent/school community

  • Mock Trial of Sam

Assessed Vocabulary

Parliament

Treason


Agitators

Lasciviousness

Bayonet

Deserter


Shilling

Regiment


Recalcitrance

Almanac


Sedition

Wharves


Sturgeon

Fusillade



Swaggering

Epidemic


Cholera

Unscrupulous

Mortar

Forage


Flogged

Heifer


Mutiny

Badgering

Stockade

Adjunct


Clemency

Court-Martial





Topic: Finding Your Voice

Big Idea: Certain symbols in the story represent the main character

Novel: Speak

Weeks: 6

Essential

Questions

  • Does time heal all wounds?

  • In the face of adversity, what causes some individuals to prevail while others fail?

How can a person’s decisions and actions change his/her life?

Enduring Understanding

  • Though scars may fade over time, people are indelibly marked by their struggles.

  • It is difficult to overcome adversity without the help and support of others.

All decisions, big or small, affect our lives.

Standards

Reading:

RL: 1.1, 2.2, 3.3, 4.4, 6.6, 7.7, 10.10



Writing:

1.1a, 1.1b, 1.1c, 1.1c, 1.1d, 1.1e, 4.4, 5.5, 10.10




Speaking and Listening

1.1 a, 1.1b, 1.1c, 1.1d, 4.4, 5.5, 6.6,



Language

1.1b, 1.1c, 1.1d, 2.2a, 2.2c, 3.3a, 4.4a, 4.4b, 4.4c, 4.4d, 5.5a, 5.5b, 5.5c, 6.6



Skills

  • Express an opinion about controversial topics

  • Quote or paraphrase relevant details

  • Summarize main idea

  • Predict outcomes based on inferences and evidence from the novel

  • Write a letter using business letter formatting and standard convention

  • Create a product to demonstrate understanding of assigned literary element

  • Interpret character’s emotional state using evidence from the novel

  • Compose novel sentences using vocabulary words demonstrating understanding of definition

  • Orally describe/defend creation of product as representative of assigned literary element

Assessments

Formative

  • Anticipation/Reaction Guide

  • Pre novel class discussion

  • Reader’s Responses- literary elements, hat word, personal connection analysis

  • Reading section quizzes- 1, 2, 3, 4

  • Vocabulary word sentences




Summative

  • Hat Word Project Oral Presentation- rubric

  • Anticipation/Reaction Guide

  • Post Novel class discussion

Activities

  • I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

  • Group work- literary elements

  • Hat word product- individual project

  • Reader’s Responses (1, 2, 3, 4)

  • Vocabulary sentences

  • Group work- reading section discussions

  • Review business/friendly letter formats

  • Anticipation/Reaction Guide

Assessed Vocabulary

  • Demerit

  • Inconspicuous

  • Wan

  • Degrading

  • Pseudo

  • Errant

  • Indoctrination

  • Burrow

  • Sanctuary

  • Demure

  • Refurbished

  • Spastic

  • Xenophobic

  • Bleak

  • Abysmal




  • Bigoted

  • Conundrum

  • Imbecile

  • Dense

  • Asphyxiate

  • Downtrodden

  • Wistful



  • Tenacious

  • Leper

  • Blight

  • Suffragette

  • Maladjusted

  • Devious

  • Muse

  • Indentured

  • Homely



Topic: Healthy Choices

Big Idea: Personal decision making contributes to emotional and physical well-being

Other: Workshop

Quarter: 3

Weeks: 1

Essential

Questions

  • How can unsafe behaviors affect my physical and emotion future?

  • In what ways can I establish and communicate personal boundaries?

  • What are the best ways to prevent STDs, including HIV/AIDS?

  • How do I use words and body language to effectively say “No” to drinking?

  • Why does the most effective “No” work best?

Enduring

Understanding

  • Emotional, sexual and reproductive health is affected by personal decisions.

  • Communication skills are an essential component in building safe boundaries and long-lasting relationships.

  • Individual decisions contribute significantly to the safety of individuals.

  • Everyone has the right to resist and to walk away from pressure to drink alcohol.

  • Deliberate actions enable people to remain in control during drinking situations.

Standards

Speaking and Listening Standards

4.4, 5.5, 6.6



Skills

  • Recognize and name the more effective and less effective ways of saying “No”

  • Demonstrate the words and body language of saying “No” in four less effective ways- passively, evasively, aggressively, and with a “know-it-all” attitude

  • Demonstrate the words and body language of saying “No” in one effective way-assertively.

  • Justify best way to say “No” based on effectiveness

  • Dramatize understanding of peer pressure through role play

  • Articulate defense of choice based on internal criteria “what is harmful”

Assessments

Formative

  • Small group analysis of role play “spoken or unspoken peer pressure” worksheet

  • Checks for understanding during Sex Ed direct instruction

Summative

Activities

  • Watch movie Speak

  • Continuum of Harm

  • Agree-Disagree Scenarios

  • Group Role Play- “bag of tricks”

  • Peer Pressure & How to say “No”- definitions think, pair, share

  • Look-Sound-Say: assertive vs. non-assertive “No”

  • Sex Ed Presentation- school Doctor

Vocabulary/ Concepts

  • Peer

  • Pressure

  • Spoken Pressure

  • Unspoken Pressure

  • Rejection

  • Put Down

  • Reasoning

  • The Huddle

  • The “Look”

  • The example

  • Passive

  • Evasive

  • Aggressive

  • Know-it-all

  • Assertive

  • Combination




Topic: Fictionalizing Conflict and Resolution

Big Idea: Literary devices enhance and deepen fiction’s impact upon the reader

Novel: Short Stories

Quarter: 3/4

Weeks: 6

Essential

Questions

  • What are the elements of plot in a short story, and how do they function together to create a fictional story?

  • Why do writers of fiction use figurative language in their stories?

  • How does a writer’s use of foreshadowing impact the meaning of a story?

  • How do writers create short stories that engage the reader?

  • How does a writer develop a character in a short story?

Enduring

Understanding

  • Engaging short stories include essential elements and revealing characters.

  • Although stories of fiction may vary greatly in degree in terms of subject matter, the structure of fiction remains relatively consistent.

Standards

Reading:

RL: 2.2, 3.3, 4.4, 5.5, 6.6, 7.7, 9.9, 10.10



Writing:

3.3a, 3.3b, 3.3c, 3.3d, 3.3e, 5.5, 10.10



Speaking and Listening

1.1 a, 1.1b, 1.1c, 1.1d, 6.6



Language

1.1b, 1.1c, 1.1d, 2.2a, 2.2b, 2.2c, 3.3a, 4.4a, 4.4b, 4.4c, 4.4d, 5.5a, 5.5b, 5.5c, 6.6



Skills

  • Identify examples of foreshadowing and determine author’s purpose for using them

  • Identify elements of plot including setting

  • Convey proper tone in a writing piece

  • Make inferences based on information provided

  • Identify and interpret figurative language in a short story including similes, metaphors, personification, pun, and hyperbole.

  • Describe setting and explain how setting contributes to the plot or theme of a short story.

Assessments

Formative:

  • Analyze The Lottery using story elements

  • My Idiosyncrasies

  • Character Sketch- library observation

  • Write a new lead to An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge

  • Detective’s Log: A Graphic Organizer

Summative:

  • Short Story Elements- Quiz

  • Watch Sherlock Holmes The Hounds of the Baskerville- analyze using Detective’s Log

  • Write an original Murder Mystery/suspense short story using essential elements

Activities

  • Short story elements sort

  • Writer’s Journal Entries

  • The Lottery- group section skits

  • Watch, discuss video The Lottery

  • Story Hill

  • 8 Ways to Reveal Character- sort

  • Guest reading: To Build a Fire- round/dynamic character

  • Read aloud/discussion: Does Fiction Matter?

  • Short story leads/hooking the reader

  • Fieldtrip to library- observation/description of a person

  • Lamb to the Slaughter- climatic moment

  • One of These Days- snapshots

  • The Mexican- ping pong dialogue vs. descriptive dialogue

  • “You Talkin’ to Me?” Rules for Quotation Marks

  • Murder mystery scavenger hunt- library

  • 8 Essential to Murder Mystery Writing

  • Jigsaw Sherlock Holmes short story groups- Detective’s Log graphic organizer

  • Individuals/Pairs write murder mystery/suspense short story

  • Read murder mystery to guest audience

  • Attend Murder Mystery afterschool dinner party

Vocabulary

  • Setting

  • Thoughtshots

  • Snapshots

  • Conflict

  • Lead

  • Resolution

  • Dialogue

  • Motive

  • Alibi

  • Idiosyncrasy

  • Protagonist

  • Simile

  • Metaphors

  • Story Hill

  • Hyperbole

  • Pun

  • Allegory

  • Suspect




Topic: Courage

Big Idea: Standing up for what is right is often difficult and even dangerous

Novel: To Kill a Mockingbird

Quarter: 4

Weeks: 8

Essential

Questions

  • What does courage look like?

  • Do we see the world differently if we “walk in someone else’s shoes”?

  • Are people essentially good or evil?

Enduring

Understanding

  • Courage often results from having witnessed extreme prejudice.

  • Inequality, racism and prejudice are a reflection of time and place and are not only about color or class.

  • It is human nature to contain aspects of both good and evil, but mostly good prevails.

Standards

Reading:

RL: 1.1, 2.2, 3.3, 4.4, 6.6, 7.7, 10.10

RI: 1.1, 2.2, 6.6, 7.7, 10.10


Writing:

1.1a, 1.1b, 1.1c, 1.1c, 1.1d, 1.1e, 7.7, 8.8, 9.9b, 10.10



Speaking and Listening

1.1 a, 1.1b, 1.1c, 1.1d, 6.6



Language

1.1b, 1.1c, 1.1d, 2.2a, 2.2c, 3.3a, 4.4a, 4.4b, 4.4c, 4.4d, 5.5a, 5.5b, 5.5c, 6.6



Skills

  • Summarize internet research

  • Analyze use of literary devices (allusion, metaphor) in poetry

  • Compare and contrast example of historical prejudice to TKAM

  • Create an urban myth

  • Explain historical time and place to assess Tom Robinson’s conviction

  • Connect historical prejudice in the US to examples of local prejudice (Bolivia)

Assessments

Formative:

  • pre-reading history and culture of Deep South 1930’s research questions

  • T chart- Emmett Till vs. Tom Robinson

  • Character Traits- Courage & Cowardice Handout

  • Reading quizzes

  • Personal vocabulary dictionary/pictionary

Summative:

Activities

  • History and cultural milieu of the Deep South 1930’s- internet research

  • Walking in Someone Else’s Shoes

  • Main Character Sketches- group work

  • Vocabulary independent choice- personal dictionary

  • Boo Radley: Mythology and Urban Legends

  • Exploring Bird Allusions through Poetry: “I know why the Caged Bird Sings” and “Dunbar”

  • Theme of prejudice- Scout’s growing awareness

  • Tom Robinson and Emmett Till: A comparison. Read article online, watch movie,

Vocabulary

http://www.lausd.k12.ca.us/Belmont_HS/tkm/



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