Crash Course World War II: Crash Course World History #38 YouTube Bellringer 28. 1 5 Points



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  • Axis Aggression Section 1
  • Pages 835-842

Crash Course

  • World War II: Crash Course World History #38 - YouTube

Bellringer 28.1 5 Points

  • You are an American living in Poland in 1939, at the outbreak of war in Poland. Should you stay and fight, or return home, would you try to encourage the United States to enter the war?
  • Main Idea
  • In the late 1930s Germany, Italy, and Japan used military force to build empires. Their aggressive actions led to the outbreak of World War II.
  • Axis Aggression

After World War I

  • Germany Expands
  • After World War I
  • Treaty of Versailles seriously damaged German economy
  • Adolf Hitler came to power
    • Promised to restore Germany’s greatness
    • Lebensraum, or “living room”
  • Hitler wanted more territory
    • Neighbors aware of threat
    • Memories of World War I still fresh
    • No one willing to fight over words
  • Militarizing the Rhineland
  • Direct action in 1936
  • Armed force sent to the Rhineland- violated Treaty of Versailles
  • French and British complained; no direct action taken
  • German troops remained; Hitler grew bolder
  • Rebuilding the German Military
  • Hitler controlled German government by 1933
  • Secretly rebuilt military
  • Unchallenged—openly stated plan to re-arm Germany
  • Claimed resisting spread of communism—but empire building

Rebuilding Germany’s Military

Rhineland- Lands East of Rhine River Buffer Zone to France and Belgium

  • Hitler demanded Austrian officials accept annexation (Anschluss)
  • Initial Austrian resistance
  • Britain and France did nothing
  • March 1938-unopposed German forces take over Austria
  • Hitler’s demands
  • Europeans eager to avoid war
  • Hitler plotted his moves
  • Target-Austria
  • German-speaking country
  • Hitler’s birthplace
  • Nazi supporters in Austria
  • Aggressive moves
  • Annexing Austria
  • Another German-speaking population
  • Sudetenland eager to be a part of Germany
  • Hitler threatened the Czech government
  • Czechs prepared for war
  • Policy of appeasement
  • Appeasement—giving in to aggressive demands in order to avoid war
  • Winston Churchill opposed the policy
  • “Peace for our time” according to Chamberlain
  • Avoiding conflict
  • September 1938—meeting in Munich
  • Chamberlain (British) and Daladier (French) agreed not to block Hitler
  • Czechs had no support
  • Threats to Czechoslovakia
  • Make Generalizations
  • How did the British and French respond to Germany’s expansion and aggression?
  • Hitler builds alliances with other totalitarian governments.
  • Military force to achieve goals
  • Anti-Comintern Pact
    • Germany and Japan
    • Prevent spread of communism
    • Oppose USSR
  • Italy joins Axis Powers later
  • Military alliance
  • Pledge aid in event of war
  • The Axis forms
  • Political conflict begins in 1936
  • Italy and Germany support fascist Nationalists
  • Soviet Union supports Republicans
  • Nationalists win after years of fighting
    • Francisco Franco
    • Fascist dictator
  • Spanish Civil War
  • Alliances and Civil War

Germany and Soviet Union on opposing sides in Spanish Civil War

  • A Secret Deal with Stalin
  • Germany and Soviet Union on opposing sides in Spanish Civil War
    • No direct conflict
    • Axis Powers united against Soviet Union
    • Soviet leader Joseph Stalin threatened by German expansion
  • France and Britain discuss possible alliance with Soviet Union
    • Stalin did not trust British or French
    • In secret negotiations with Germans
  • German-Soviet Nonaggression Pact
  • News shocked British and French; Hitler definitely on the march
  • Identify Supporting Details
  • With whom did Hitler seek alliances in the late 1930s?
  • Answer(s): Japan and Italy; he also signed a nonaggression pact with the Soviet Union
  • September 1, 1939
  • Germany attacked Poland
  • World War II begins
  • Blitzkrieg or “lightning war”
  • Support for Poland
  • Britain and France declared war on Germany
  • Allies gave no real help
  • Poland fell into German hands
  • Devastating effects
  • Polish air force destroyed
  • Soldiers fought; no match for German forces
  • No natural barriers in the way
  • German troops in position
  • On Germany’s western border
  • Hitler eager for assault on France
  • Plans for invasion made
  • The War Begins

Hitler moves on

  • Attack on France
  • Denmark and Norway captured; the Netherlands and Belgium followed
  • Tank attack through Ardennes; overwhelmed light resistance there
  • Heroic Dunkirk rescue; France surrendered in June 1940
  • Battle for Britain
  • Great Britain stood alone against German war machine; Churchill now leader
  • Radar technology secret weapon for air defense
  • British stood firm during Battle of Britain; Hitler called off invasion plans
  • 1940–1941

German Air raids on Britain

  • June 1941, Hitler’s invasion of the Soviet Union had initial successes
  • WHAT?? We had a non aggression pact
  • Major goals of Leningrad and Moscow not reached before harsh Soviet winter
  • Soviet armies had time to rebuild and would fight back
  • Invasion of the Soviet Union
  • Sequence
  • With what events did the war begin?
  • Answer(s): invasion of Poland, followed by the massing of German troops on its western border
  • Japan’s alliance with Germany was seen as a sign of a war plan. Japan sent forces to Indochina to secure necessary resources of oil and rubber. Hideki Tojo held peace talks with the U.S. but planned for war.
  • Surprise attack on U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet
  • December 7, 1941
  • Fighters and bombers launched from carriers
  • Raid a success
  • Pearl Harbor
  • Major destruction
  • Heavy casualties
    • 2,400 dead
    • 200 planes gone
    • Eight battleships sunk
  • Three carriers survived
  • Two-hour attack
  • Japan Attacks

Pearl Harbor

  • Attack had profound effect
  • Ended desire to stay out of Europe’s war
  • War declared on Japan
  • Germany and Italy declare war on U.S.
  • Allies vs. Axis
  • Isolationism

The Powers

  • Axis Powers
  • Japan
  • Germany
  • Italy
  • Allied Powers
  • Great Britain
  • Free France
  • USSR
  • US
  • Find the Main Idea
  • Why did Japan attack the United States?
  • Answer(s): American leaders banned the sale of oil to Japan, which threatened Japan's future plans in French Indochina.

GROG 28.1 5 Points

  • Sequence Review your notes on the events leading up to World War II. Then fill in the interactive graphic organizer with explanations of how events of the 1930s led to the outbreak of World War II and how the world reacted to each event.
  • The Allied Response
  • Section 2
  • Pages 843-850

Bellringer 28.2 5 Points

  • Persuasion Write a brief conversation between Neville Chamberlain and Winston Churchill. In your conversation, have the speakers discuss what Great Britain should do about Germany’s increasingly aggressive actions.
  • Main Idea
  • The early years of World War II went poorly for the Allies. But after the United States joined the war, the Allies soon recovered and began making gains against the Axis.
  • The Allied Response
  • Control of the ocean important
  • Food and equipment for England and Soviet Union shipped by sea
  • Germany relied on U-boats
  • Inflicted great damage to shipping
  • U.S. offered military aid before entering war
  • Provided ships and military escorts for British convoys
  • October 1941—USS Reuben James; first U.S. Navy ship sunk by Germany
  • The Battle of the Atlantic
  • Early American Involvement
  • U.S. entered war two months later
  • Enormous task of mobilization; men and women volunteered for service
  • Factories converted; “victory gardens” planted; scrap drives and recycling to collect materials
  • Some negative effects of patriotism
  • Japanese Americans placed in internment camps during the war by US government
  • American Home Front

Japanese Internment Camps

With U.S. officially at war, German U-boats in American waters

  • Winning the Atlantic
  • With U.S. officially at war, German U-boats in American waters
  • Tried to destroy American merchant ships
    • Hundreds of ships lost to German subs
    • After 1943, Allies able to fight back more effectively
  • Allied factories at full production
    • Large numbers of ships and planes
    • More firepower helped locate and destroy U-boats
    • Key German code system broken
  • Losses dropped sharply
    • Vital supply line to Great Britain and Soviet Union kept open
    • Atlantic belonged to Allies– Atlantic Charter
  • Find the Main Idea
  • How were Americans on the home front involved in the war?
  • Answer(s): Many factories converted to produce weapons and supplies; Americans made do with less food, fuel, and other items; people planted "victory gardens".
  • Nearly 250,000 Axis soldiers taken prisoner; with surrender, all of North Africa in Allied hands
  • Italian and British forces battled for control of North Africa. The Suez Canal and the oil fields of the Middle East were essential to the British war effort. After Italian forces failed against the British, Hitler was forced to send German troops to support the Italians.
  • Afrika Korps led by Erwin Rommel
  • Pushed British back into Egypt
  • Traded blows for two years
  • 1942—Battle of El Alamein
  • British victory under Gen. Bernard Montgomery
  • Axis power lessened in North Africa
  • Back-and-forth fighting
  • War in North Africa and Italy

Next Allied goal: Italy itself

  • Fighting in Italy
  • Next Allied goal: Italy itself
  • July 1943, Allied soldiers landed on the island of Sicily
    • Weak Italian resistance
    • Benito Mussolini forced from power
  • Allies capture Sicily
    • Made plans to invade the Italian mainland
    • Hitler tried to protect against the Allied march through Italy
  • September 1943
  • Summarize
  • What did Allied troops accomplish in the war in North Africa and Italy?
  • Answer(s): They drove the Axis out of North Africa and used it as a base for launching an invasion of Europe through Italy.
  • Leningrad
  • Citizens under siege in Hitler’s attempt to force a surrender
  • Winter of 1941—1942, thousands starved to death daily
  • Siege of Leningrad cost 1 million civilian lives
  • A Turning Point in the Soviet Union
  • 1941 German invasion halted with winter
  • German equipment failed in bitter cold
  • Poorly equipped troops suffered greatly
  • In the spring of 1942, Hitler ordered renewed assaults on the Soviet Union. He assembled troops from Italy, Romania, and Hungary. Even with fuel shortages, Axis forces fought well initially.
  • Germans poised to take Stalingrad
  • Key industrial city for Soviets
  • Factories supplied Soviet armies
  • Ports shipped grain, oil, and other products throughout country
  • On the Volga River
  • Battle of Stalingrad

Stalingrad

  • Summarize
  • Why was the Battle of Stalingrad a turning point?
  • Answer(s): The German army had seemed invincible, but after failing to take Stalingrad, it was now retreating to the west.

The attack on Pearl Harbor was an enormous success for Japan.

  • A Turning Point in the Pacific
  • The attack on Pearl Harbor was an enormous success for Japan.
  • The damage took time to overcome; U.S. ability to strike back was limited.
  • Three Pacific Fleet aircraft carriers undamaged
    • Air power provided support for Allied ground and naval forces
    • Japanese navy still ruled the seas
    • Allies focused on Europe
  • Vital territory fell to Japanese
    • Singapore, Hong Kong, Burma, and strategic islands
    • Target —U.S.-held Philippines
    • U.S. general Douglas MacArthur led doomed defense
    • Americans surrendered in April 1942
  • Bataan Death March
    • Forced march of 70,000 American and Filipino prisoners
    • Brutal violence, tropical heat, and lack of food or water
    • Many survivors perished in inhumane prison camps

Bataan Death March

  • June 1942—high seas battle
  • Midway a strategic island—home to U.S. military base
  • Japanese advantage—more ships and carriers
  • U.S. advantage—Japanese secret code broken
  • Admiral Chester Nimitz responsible for Allied victory; Japan’s navy suffered terrible blow
  • Battle of Midway
  • Balance of power changed
  • Japanese lost sea advantage after Midway
  • Allies developed island-hopping strategy
  • Skipped over strongholds and captured weaker targets
  • Captured islands used as bases for next attacks
  • Bypassed Japanese strongholds cut off from outside supplies
  • Island Hopping
  • Find the Main Idea
  • How was the Battle of Midway a turning point in the war in the Pacific?
  • Answer(s): It changed the balance of power in the Pacific, eliminating the once great Japanese advantage on the seas, and allowing the Allies to go on the offensive.

GROG 28.2 5 Points

  • 5. Identify Cause and Effect Review your notes on Allied successes in the war in 1942 and 1943. Then fill in the interactive graphic organizer by identifying the main turning points in the war during those two years.
  • The Holocaust
  • Section 3
  • Pages 854-857

Bellringer 26.3 5 Points

  • Write a one-paragraph letter home from the viewpoint of a civilian in Stalingrad during the Battle of Stalingrad. In your letter, describe the battle and its outcome.
  • Main Idea
  • During World War II, Germany’s Nazi government deliberately murdered some 6 million Jews and 5 million others in Europe. These actions became known as the Holocaust.
  • The Holocaust

At the time of Hitler’s rise to power, 9 million Jews lived in Europe.

  • Nazi Anti-Semitism
  • At the time of Hitler’s rise to power, 9 million Jews lived in Europe.
  • Hitler blamed Jews for Germany’s problems
  • Promoted belief of racial superiority of German people
    • No factual basis for anti-Semitism
    • No factual basis for claims about “master race”
  • Many Germans found Hitler’s twisted vision appealing
    • Germans had suffered through World War I
    • Humiliation of Treaty of Versailles
    • Economic crises of 1920s and 1930s
    • Jews a convenient scapegoat, blamed for wrongs in Germany
  • In Europe
  • Hostility based on religion
  • Nuremberg Laws
  • Separate legal status for German Jews- this was done prior to WWII
  • Under Hitler
  • Hatred based on race
  • Deportation
  • Thousands of Jews deported
  • Long History of Anti-Semitism
  • Aftermath of Great Depression
  • Nations recovering economically; jobs scarce
  • Strict limits set on number of Germans allowed in
  • 250,000 Jews trapped at start of war
  • Germany outlawed emigration late in 1941
  • Limited emigration options
  • Nazi laws left Jews without money, without property
  • Countries unwilling to take in poor immigrants
  • Summarize
  • Describe Nazi anti-Semitism in the 1930s.
  • Answer(s): Jews had separate legal status, no citizenship and no right to hold government jobs, limited right to work and own property; thousands of Jews deported
  • Conquered areas of Europe
  • Millions of Jews came under Hitler’s power
  • Nazi leaders adopted “Final Solution”—the deliberate mass execution of Jews, including concentration camps, death camps, and Einsatzgruppen
  • Concentration camps
  • Slave labor camps set up to hold these “enemies of the state”
  • Cruel medical experiments
  • Large-scale executions with civilians gunned down
  • Killing begins
  • Brutal treatment of Jewish civilians
  • Forced to live in ghettos within a city
    • 400,000 Jews confined to Warsaw ghetto
  • The “Final Solution”

The Killings Begin

  • As the Nazis moved across Europe the SS killing squads rounded up men, women, children, and even babies and shot them in pits where they were buried.
  • Other Jews were rounded up and herded into concentration camps where they were slave labor.
  • Inmates would work seven days a week for the SS or for German businesses. Food consisted of thin soup, scraps of bread, and potato peelings. Most inmates lost 50 lbs quickly.

Einstzgruppen

  • After Germany’s invasion of the Soviet Union, Hitler called for the destruction of all European Jews.
  • Mobile killing units
  • Carried out large-scale executions
  • Babi Yar
  • 35,000 Jews murdered
  • Einsatzgruppen
  • Germans did not want world to know
  • Special death camps established
  • Gas chambers and furnaces used
  • Too much evidence
  • After 1941

The Final Stage

  • In 1942 the Germans built huge exterminations camps equipped with gas chambers that could kill as many as 6,000 people in a day.
  • Committees of Nazi doctors separated the strong (mostly men) from the weak (women, children, and elderly). The weak went to their deaths in the gas chambers usually that day.
  • The victims were told to undress and head into the gas chambers under the guise they were taking showers. Cyanide gas from Zyklon B granules came through the fake showerheads.
  • Zyklon B granules on display at Auschwitz
  • Empty Zyklon B canisters found by the Allies at Auschwitz at the end of World War II
  • Answer(s): Nazi leaders adopted a plan they called the "Final Solution"—the deliberate, mass execution of Jewish prisoners.
  • As the Allies pushed Germans back, the concentration camps were discovered, in spite of German attempts to cover up evidence.
  • Other countries were aware of Hitler’s anti-Semitism in the 1930s. After the outbreak of war, the extent of Hitler’s brutality was shielded from the outside world.
  • By 1942, people heard disturbing reports of widespread killings
  • Reports confirmed; no concrete action was taken
  • War Refugee Board established in 1944, aided 200,000 Jews
  • Reports of killings
  • The World Reacts
  • Allies primarily concerned with larger war effort
  • Camps and railroad lines not bombed
  • Apathy and anti-Semitism also contributed
  • Government inaction
  • Actions revealed
  • January 1945, Soviet troops found starving survivors at Auschwitz
  • Evidence showed number of prisoners once held there
  • Scenes of horror
  • Hardened combat veterans unable to describe the death and destruction
  • Clear picture of Hitler’s control
  • Nazi hopes of world domination would not last
  • Buchenwald and other camps
  • April 1945, Americans reached Buchenwald to find thousands of corpses; remaining inmates near death
  • British reached Bergen-Belsen camp, finding 35,000 bodies
  • Auschwitz

Jews Killed Under Nazi Rule*

  • Original Jewish Population
  • Jews Killed
  • Percent Surviving
  • Poland
  • 3,300,000
  • 2,800,000
  • 15%
  • Soviet Union (area occupied by Germans)
  • 2,100,000
  • 1,500,000
  • 29%
  • Hungary
  • 404,000
  • 200,000
  • 49%
  • Romania
  • 850,000
  • 425,000
  • 50%
  • Germany/Austria
  • 270,000
  • 210,000
  • 22%
  • *Estimates Source: Hannah Vogt, The Burden of Guilt

The Survivors

  • About six million European Jews were killed during the Holocaust.
  • Less than four million European Jews survived.
  • Some Jews were helped by non-Jews who risked there lives, hid Jews in their homes, and helped them escape to neutral countries.
  • Summarize
  • How did the world react to Nazi killing of Jews and other prisoners?
  • Answer(s): At first they didn't believe them, but as the reports were confirmed, they met to discuss possible responses. In January 1944, the United States established the War Refugee Board to help rescue Jews in Europe.

Camp Markings

  • Political Enemies
  • Professional Criminals
  • Foreign Forced Laborers
  • Jehovah’s Witnesses
  • Sex Offenders and homo-sexuals
  • “Asocials”
  • Roma (Gypsies)
  • Nazi concentration camp badges, primarily triangles, were part of the system of identification in Nazi camps. They were used in the concentration camps in the Nazi-occupied countries to identify the reason the prisoners had been placed there. The triangles were made of fabric and were sewn on jackets and trousers of the prisoners. These mandatory badges of shame had specific meanings indicated by their colour and shape.

Special Markings

  • Race defiler
  • Female Race defiler
  • Escape Suspect
  • Pole
  • Czech
  • Enemy POW
  • Special Inmate (brown armband)

A poster in German explaining the marking system

  • Dutch Jews wearing the yellow star with an “N” superimposed over it meaning they were from the Netherlands.

Auschwitz Death Camp, Poland

  • Except for the picture on this slide, all other Auschwitz pictures are by Elisabeth Yankey taken in 2001.
  • This wheeled table helped transport the bodies of the gassed victims to the ovens for cremation.
  • This mechanism rotated the table upon which the bodies of the gassed victims were transferred to the ovens for cremation.
  • There was once a building standing here, but this is the area where the Nazis themselves burned this building down to attempt to destroy evidence of the death camps.
  • inmate barracks
  • These are burned down barracks where the Nazis again tried to destroy evidence of atrocities in the Auschwitz camp.

GROG 28.3 5 Points

  • Review your notes about Nazi anti-Semitism. Then fill in the interactive graphic organizer by describing the main events of the Holocaust.

Short Essay

  • Read pages 864-865
  • On the front of a piece of paper, answer questions 1-5 both a and b
  • Then on the back of that paper write a short 5 paragraph essay on the following question:
  • How could an event as large and as terrible as the Holocaust have taken place?
  • Using the documents above and information from the chapter, form a thesis that explains your position on the above mentioned question. Then write a short essay to support it.
  • You must have an opening (stating your thesis), 3 supporting paragraphs (support your thesis, and a closing (restating your thesis)
  • Main Idea
  • In 1945 the Allies finally triumphed over the Axis powers, but the war left many nations in ruins.
  • The End of the War
  • Soviet advance—pushing Hitler’s troops backward
  • Axis forces with 2 million casualties—outnumbered and outgunned
  • Early 1944, Siege of Leningrad ends; more victories for Soviets followed
  • Axis forces driven back into central Europe
  • Soviets within 40 miles of Berlin by February 1945
  • Second front in Western Europe
  • Sea assault led by Marshall and Eisenhower launched from UK
  • June 6, 1944, invasion at Normandy
  • Victory came with high casualties
  • Paris free by end of August
  • D-Day
  • War Ends in Europe

D-Day

  • Soviets reached Berlin first
  • Adolf Hitler found dead in bunker—a suicide
  • Berlin surrendered May 2, 1945; Germany five days later
  • Victory in Europe (V-E Day) proclaimed May 8, 1945
  • War in Europe finally over after nearly six years
  • The Germans Surrender
  • Draw Conclusions
  • What effect did D-Day have on the war in Europe?
  • Answer(s): The Allies quickly reconquered much of France and started to push into Germany from the west.
  • Final Battles
  • By mid-1944, regular bombing raids on Japanese cities, including Tokyo
  • Great distance made raids difficult, dangerous
  • Americans needed bases closer to Japan
  • Battle of Okinawa
  • Only 350 miles from Japan; U.S. troops invaded island April 1945
  • By June, 12,000 American soldiers dead
  • Japanese lost 100,000 defenders and another 100,000 civilians
  • Battle of Iwo Jima
  • February 1945 island invasion; 750 miles south of Tokyo
  • 7,000 Americans died in month of fighting; 20,000 Japanese died—only 1,000 thousand surrendered
  • War Ends in the Pacific
  • Emperor Hirohito surrendered on August 15, 1945. This day is known as V-J Day for Victory in Japan. World War II was finally over.
  • After Okinawa, mainland Japan was next
  • The U.S. military estimated cost of invading mainland Japan-up to 1 million Allied killed or wounded
  • Atomic bomb successfully tested in 1945
  • Harry S Truman U.S. president with Roosevelt’s death in May 1945
  • Forced to make decision—bomb Japanese city to force surrender
  • Option to invasion
  • July 26, 1945
  • Allies issued demand for surrender
  • No response; Hiroshima bombed on August 6
  • Still no surrender; second bomb dropped on Nagasaki on August 9
  • 145,000 total deaths
  • Japanese acknowledged defeat
  • The Atomic Bomb

Atom Bomb over Hiroshima

Atom Bomb over Nagasaki

  • Find the Main Idea
  • What brought an end to the war in the Pacific?
  • Answer(s): the dropping of atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

End of war, Europe and Asia in ruins

  • The Postwar World
  • End of war, Europe and Asia in ruins
  • Tens of millions dead; heaviest losses in Eastern Europe
  • Germany, Japan, and China had also suffered greatly
    • Physical devastation; cities, villages, and farms destroyed
    • National economies near collapse
  • Millions uprooted
    • former prisoners of war, survivors of concentration camps, refugees of fighting and of national border changes
  • July 1941
  • Allied leaders planned for years for the of war
  • Churchill and Roosevelt met to discuss even before U.S. entered war
  • Joint declaration of Churchill and Roosevelt
  • Outlined purpose of war
  • Sought no territorial gains
  • All nations could choose their own government
  • Work for mutual prosperity
  • Atlantic Charter
  • Planning for the Future
  • United Nations
  • Roosevelt got Stalin to agree to join fight against Japan once war in Europe over
  • USSR would join new world organization—United Nations
  • Meant to encourage international cooperation and prevent war
  • June 1945 charter signed with five major Allies as Security Council
  • Yalta Conference
  • Held in Soviet territory in early 1945; Allies on brink of military victory
  • Primary goal to reach agreement on postwar Europe
  • Roosevelt, Stalin, and Churchill agreed on plans for Germany
  • Stalin got his way with Polish territory, made promises
  • July 1945
  • Small German city location for Potsdam Conference
  • Growing ill will between Soviet Union and other Allies
  • Closing months
  • American and British leaders worried about Stalin’s intentions
  • Concerned about spread of communism, growth of Soviet influence
  • Three sides
  • Soviet Union, Britain, and United States
  • Discussed many issues but had difficulty reaching agreement
  • Stalin
  • Soon broke his promises
  • Did not respect democracies in Eastern Europe
  • Another struggle beginning
  • Potsdam Conference
  • Summarize
  • What major decisions did Allied leaders make at Yalta and Potsdam?
  • Answer(s): At Yalta, Allied leaders agreed on what to do with postwar Europe. Roosevelt persuaded Stalin to join the fight against Japan and to join the United Nations. At Potsdam, the three sides discussed many issues concerning postwar Europe, but often had difficulty reaching agreement.

GROG 28.4 5 Points

  • Review your notes about the end of the war in Europe and in the Pacific. Then use the interactive graphic organizer to explain what led to the end of the war.


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