Clas 360H: Ancient Greek Civilization and Culture



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CLAS 360H:

Ancient Greek Civilization and Culture

Instructor information:


Instructor: Matthew Semanoff

Office: LA 425

Email: matthew.semanoff@umontana.edu

Phone: 243-2401

Office hours: MW 2:00-3:00; TTh 1:00-2:00; or by appointment

Course Information:


Time and Days: 11:00-12:20 am, Tuesdays and Thursdays

Room: JRH 204


Course description:


This course surveys the history, literature, art, and philosophy of the ancient Greeks. Beginning with Crete in the Bronze Age (2000 BCE), we will study the literary and artistic periods that exemplify the civilization and culture of the Greek world through the Hellenistic Age (3rd C BCE). Students will examine how the literary and artistic movements of the periods studied reflect and inform contemporary political and philosophical movements. Through the study of Greek art and literature we will reconstruct a multi-dimensional view of the Greek World.

Learning Outcomes:


At the end of the semester, the successful student will:

  1. be familiar with the major literary and artistic periods of Greek history.

  2. be able to identify ‘canonical’ works of Greek art and architecture and point out important features of those works.

  3. be able to use a variety of sources including literary and artistic works to synthesize ideas and explain the causes and consequences of historical and cultural developments and events.

  4. be able to evaluate Greek art and literature within its historical and cultural framework.

  5. be able to explain how a work of Greek art and/or literature reflects the intellectual climate of the period in which it was produced.

  6. be able to recognize features of Greek art and literature that have influenced western culture in general and continue to influence contemporary art and literature.

  7. be able to analyze the ideas and institutions of Greek Civilization within the appropriate historical and social contexts.

Required textbooks:


  • Knox, Bernard, ed. The Norton Book of Classical Literature. New York and London: Norton & Co. 1993.

  • Neer, Richard. Greek Art and Archaeology: A New History, c. 2500- c. 150 BCE. New York: Thames & Hudson. 2012.

  • Sansone, David. Ancient Greek Civilization.



Course Calendar:


Tentative schedule subject to change.

Week 1







8/30

Tuesday

Introduction: Geography of Mediterranean

9/1

Thursday

Historical Overview: Bronze Age to Hellenistic Age

Week 2







9/6

Tuesday

Bronze Age: The Aegean







Reading: Sansone Forward AND Mendelsohn on the Parthenon (Moodle)







Map Quiz

9/8

Thursday

Minoans







Reading: Neer 25-41










Week 3







9/13

Tuesday

Mycenaeans







Reading: Sansone Ch. 1; Neer 47-63







Chronology Quiz

9/15

Thursday

Invention of Writing







Reading: Selections from Chadwick (Moodle)










Week 4







9/20

Tuesday

Life in the Iron Age







Reading: Selections from Works and Days (Knox 187-201)










9/22

Thursday

Geometric Art: Pottery and Bronze







Slide Quiz










Week 5







9/27

Tuesday

First Exam

9/29

Thursday

Myth and Religion







Selections from Hesiod's Theogony (Moodle)







Reading Quiz










Week 6







10/4

Tuesday

Greek Lyric Poetry: A Political Voice







Selections by Archilochus, Tyrtaeus, Theognis







Analysis Paper #1 Lyric Poetry

10/6

Thursday

RMMLA Topic TBA










Week 7







10/11

Tuesday

Archaic or Renaissance?







Reading: Sansone Ch 4

10/13

Thursday

Architecture and Sculpture of the Greek Renaissance







Whitley 213-230














Week 8







10/18

Tuesday

Dawn of the Classical Age: The Persian Wars







Reading: Sansone Ch 6







Slide Quiz

10/20

Thursday

Herodotus: Father of History, Son of Ionian Speculation







Reading: Selections from Herodotus (Knox) AND Supplementary selections on Moodle










Week 9







10/25

Tuesday

From Archaic to Classical







Neer 204-209; 218-240

10/27

Thursday

The Radical Democracy: Politics and Law in Athens







Reading: Sansone Ch 7










Week 10







11/1

Tuesday

The Politics of Tragedy: Sophocles







Reading: Sophocles' Antigone (Knox)







Reading Quiz

11/3

Thursday

Second Exam










Week 11







11/8

Tuesday

Election Day - No Class

11/10

Thursday

Classical Art: Human Form and Triumph of Order Over Chaos







Whitley 269-286 (Moodle)










Week 12







11/15

Tuesday

Athens and Sparta: The Peloponnesian War







Reading: Sansone Ch 9 AND Supplementary selections from Thucydides (Moodle)







Analysis Paper #2: Democracy and the Melian Dialogue

11/17

Thursday

The Comedy of Aristophanes: A Political Voice (Reprise)







Reading: Aristophanes' Lysistrata (Moodle)










Week 13







11/22

Tuesday

The City of Athens: The Acropolis







Reading: Neer 266-291; Supplementary: Whitley 329-356 (Moodle)

11/24

Thursday

Thanksgiving No Class










Week 14







11/29

Tuesday

Delphi and Olympia







Reading: Neer 172-193







Slide Quiz

12/1

Thursday

Expansion of the Oikoumene: Humanity and Hellenistic Sculpture







Reading: Sansone Ch 12







Analysis Paper #3: The Human Form










Week 15







12/6

Tuesday

Hellenistic Literature: Alternatives to the Classical







Reading: Selections from Callimachus, Apollonius, Theocritus (Knox)

12/8

Thursday

Summary and Conclusions



Final Exam: Wednesday, Dec. 14. 10:10-12:10

Required assignments and tests:


Important Dates:

9/6

Map Quiz

9/13

Chronology Quiz

9/22

Slide Quiz

9/27

First Exam

9/29

Reading Quiz

10/4

Analysis Paper #1

10/18

Slide Quiz

11/1

Reading Quiz

11/3

Second Exam

11/15

Analysis Paper #2

11/29

Slide Quiz

12/1

Analysis Paper #3

Course guidelines and policies:

Grading policy


Grades will be calculated according to the following breakdown: 10% Participation; 20% Response papers; 30% Quizzes; 40% Examinations.

  • Participation: Students are expected not only to attend but also to participate actively in class discussion.




  • Short Analysis Papers: Students will write three analysis papers over the course of the semester. These 2-3 page, thesis-driven papers will begin with a brief description of a particular literary, artistic, or architectural work. The bulk of the paper will argue what the significance is of that particular work. In other words, the paper will explain what we learn about Greek Civiliation and/or Greek Culture. More information to follow: topics and a rubric will be distributed separately.



  • Quizzes: Students will take seven brief quizzes over the course of the semester. These include one map quiz, one chronology quiz, two reading quizzes, and three slide quizzes. Quizzes will be administered during the first 15 minutes of class.



  • Examinations: Students will take two mid-term examinations and a final examination. All exams will include a section with slide identification, passage identification, and essays.


Attendance


I expect you to make every effort to attend class. If you are unable to do so, please contact me; you are responsible for making any necessary arrangements for whatever you missed in class. Late papers will be penalized by one grade per day, unless prior arrangements have been made. I will not reschedule quizzes or exams unless arrangements have been made prior to the absence. Poor attendance will affect your participation grade.
PLEASE NOTE: Repeated tardiness or getting up in the middle of class is considered part of your attendance record. Similarly, dealing with a phone, whether silencing an incoming call, answering a call, sending or receiving text messages is part of your attendance record; you are not “attending” class, if you are frequently responding to messages emanating from outside the classroom. Additionally, these are distracting to your instructor and fellow classmates. Please show respect by limiting these types of disruptions.

Disability modifications


The University of Montana assures equal access to instruction through collaboration between students with disabilities, instructors, and Disability Services for Students. If you think you may have a disability adversely affecting your academic performance, and you have not already registered with Disability Services, please contact Disability Services in Lommasson Center 154 or call 406.243.2243. I will work with you and Disability Services to provide an appropriate modification.

Student Conduct Code


All students must practice academic honesty. Academic misconduct is subject to an academic penalty by the course instructor and/or a disciplinary sanction by the University. All students need to be familiar with the Student Conduct Code. The Code is available for review online at Student Conduct Code .






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