ChemMatters Reading Strategies December 2017/January 2018



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ChemMatters Reading Strategies * December 2017/January 2018


These graphic organizers are provided to help students locate and analyze information from the articles. Student understanding will be enhanced when they explore and evaluate the information themselves, with input from the teacher if students are struggling. Encourage students to use their own words and avoid copying entire sentences from the articles. The use of bullets helps them do this. If you use these reading and writing strategies to evaluate student performance, you may want to develop a grading rubric such as the one below.



Score

Description

Evidence

4

Excellent

Complete; details provided; demonstrates deep understanding.

3

Good

Complete; few details provided; demonstrates some understanding.

2

Fair

Incomplete; few details provided; some misconceptions evident.

1

Poor

Very incomplete; no details provided; many misconceptions evident.

0

Not acceptable

So incomplete that no judgment can be made about student understanding



Teaching Strategies:


  • Links to Common Core Standards for Reading:

    • ELA-Literacy.RST.9-10.1: Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts, attending to the precise details of explanations or descriptions.

    • ELA-Literacy.RST.9-10.5: Analyze the structure of the relationships among concepts in a text, including relationships among key terms (e.g., force, friction, reaction force, energy).

    • ELA-Literacy.RST.11-12.1: Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts, attending to important distinctions the author makes and to any gaps or inconsistencies in the account.

    • ELA-Literacy.RST.11-12.4: Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 11-12 texts and topics.




  • Links to Common Core Standards for Writing:

    • ELA-Literacy.WHST.9-10.2F: Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

    • ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.1E: Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from or supports the argument presented.




  • Vocabulary and concepts that are reinforced in this issue:




    • Metric units

    • Structural Formulas

    • Fermentation

    • pH

    • Electrochemistry

    • Oxidation & Reduction

    • Amines

    • Allotropes

    • Physical properties

    • London dispersion forces




  • Most of the articles in this issue provide opportunities for students to consider how understanding chemistry can help them make decisions in their personal lives.




  • Consider asking students to read “Open for Discussion: Are Vitamin Supplements Necessary?” on page 4 to extend the information in “Got Vitamin D?” on pages 5-6.




  • The infographic on page 19 provides more information to support the article “Drained: The Search for Long Lasting Batteries” on pages 10-12.




    • You could ask students what batteries and pencils have in common (graphite), then ask them to elaborate on the physical properties of graphite that makes it appropriate for both uses.




  • To help students engage with the text, ask students which article engaged them most and why, or what questions they still have about the articles.




  • You might also ask them how information in the articles might affect their health and/or consumer choices. Also ask them if they have questions about some of the issues discussed in the articles.






Got Vitamin D?
Directions: As you read, complete the graphic organizer below to describe where we obtain vitamin D and why we need it.


Vitamin D




Sources




How our bones use it




Effects of overdose






Summary: On the back of this paper, use information from the article to write a tweet (280 characters or less) about vitamin D.

Cheesy Science!

Directions: As you read the article, complete the graphic organizer below to compare the chemistry of how hard and soft cheeses are produced.


Examples of hard cheese

Steps to produce hard cheese

pH

Temperature

What happens in this step




Adding bacteria










Creating curd (coagulation)










Finishing cheese












Examples of soft cheese

Steps to produce soft cheese

pH

Temperature

What happens in this step




Adding bacteria










Creating curd (coagulation)










Finishing cheese











Summary: On the back of this paper, write three new things you learned about making cheese that would like to share with a friend.
Drained: The Search for Long Lasting Batteries

Directions: As you read the article, complete the graphic organizer below to describe the chemistry of batteries.


Battery Part

Anode

Cathode

Electrolyte

What it does/ What happens










Single use alkaline battery










Lithium-ion rechargeable battery










Future possibilities being researched











Summary: On the back of this paper, list two ways to increase the battery life of current cell phone batteries, and why these methods work.

Teens and Depression

Directions: As you read the article, complete the graphic organizer below to compare SSRis and MAOIs.





SSRIs

MAOIs

Examples







How they work







Side Effects









Summary: On the back of this paper, write a short email (2-3 sentences) to a friend explaining the chemistry of depression.

The Write Stuff: The Fascinating Chemistry of Pencils

Directions: As you read the article, complete the graphic organizer below to describe what you learned about the chemistry of all parts of pencils.


Pencil part

What it is made of

The chemistry of how it works

Pencil core (“lead”)







Painted part







Metal holding eraser







Eraser








Summary: On the back of this paper, write a one-sentence summary (20 words or less) of the article.

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