Chapter eight



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  • CHAPTER EIGHT
  • - Saul of Tarsus, future St. Paul, was an extraordinary disciple of Jesus
  • - 13 of 27 New Testament books are attributed to him but he probably only wrote seven
  • - He persecuted Christians before his revelation
  • - Was baptized by Ananias
  • - His upbringing in Tarsus made him familiar with Gentile religions, philosophies, and customs
  • Life of St. Paul
  • Journey 1
  • Island of Cyprus and the Asia Minor locales
  • -Paul engaged in three extensive missionary journeys:
  • Journey 2
  • Antioch was again the starting point. He revisited some cities from his second journey, but remained in Ephesus for three years
  • Journey 3
  • Letters of Paul
  • 1 Thessalonians
  • - Earliest NT writing
  • • Dates from only twenty years after Jesus’ life
  • - Encourages Thessalonians, defends his proclamation of the gospel, shares news of his travel plans, and addresses two issues:
  • 1.) Advised the Thessalonians to remain holy
  • 2.) Assured them that Christians who had died would rise one day and live with the Lord forever
  • Letters of Paul
  • Galatians
  • - First of Paul’s so-called “great” letters
  • - Paul expresses anger toward the Jewish-Christian evangelists who introduced division in his Galatian churches
  • - Doctrinal section of Paul’s letters answers his opponents charges
  • - Paul uses a scriptural argument to defend the truth that faith brings about a right relationship with God
  • Letters of Paul
  • Philemon
  • - Paul encourages his friend Philemon to accept back his runaway slave as his brother
  • - Paul does not want Philemon to punish the slave, and hints towards freeing him.
  • - Paul is trying to show that the slave is also transformed in Jesus Christ, and therefore a brother
  • Letters of Paul
  • 1 Corinthians
  • - Corinth had a reputation for permitting every known vice and being immoral
  • - Paul wrote a letter to warn them away from immorality
  • - Body of the letter has the following themes: •Divisions in the Corinthian church • Problems in Christian morality and living • Problems in Christian worship • The Resurrection
  • Letters of Paul
  • 2 Corinthians
  • - Neither the first nor second letter had much impact, so Paul wrote a third letter harshly critical of Corinthian abuse (letter is now lost)
  • • Major problem this time was false teachers who had influenced the Corinthians to go against teachings of Paul
  • - Titus brought good news about Corinthians: they were beginning to respond to Paul’s word and reject false teachings
  • Letters of Paul
  • 2 Corinthians
  • - In response to good news, Paul wrote 2 Corinthians
  • - The body of the work deals with:
  • •Paul’s past relationships with the Corinthians
  • • His ministry among them
  • Praise for their repentance
  • • Appeal for the collection for the church in Jerusalem
  • • Defense of his ministry against false teachers
  • Letters of Paul
  • Romans
  • - Paul’s letter of introduction to the Christians living in Rome
  • - Longest letter and his deepest theologically
  • - Treats in more detail some themes Paul introduced in Galatians
  • - Central theme is: Faith in Jesus’ death and resurrection reconciles us to God
  • Letters of Paul
  • 5 Key Points in Romans:
  • A description of the human condition before Christ
  • Justification through faith in Christ
  • Salvation and Christian freedom
  • Christian behavior
  • Deuteropauline Letters
  • - Six letters might have been written by a close disciple of Paul
  • - Reflect Paul’s thought, but have different vocabulary, style, theological themes, content, and historical context
  • Deuteropauline Letters
  • 2 Thessalonians
  • - Some thought Paul wrote it shortly after his first letter to the Thessalonians to address a misunderstanding about his teaching about the resurrection
  • -Current scholars favor that it is a pseudonymous letter • Written under someone else’s name
  • -Readers are told that Jesus will not come again until certain signs take place
  • - People need to prepare themselves with patience and prayer
  • Deuteropauline Letters
  • Colossians
  • -Colossian, Philippians, Philemon, and Ephesians are the “Captivity Letters”
  • • Each reveal that its author was imprisoned
  • - Few doubt that Paul wrote Philemon and Philippians
  • - Scholars believe one of Paul’s disciples wrote Ephesians and Colossians
  • - Colossians was written to counteract some teachings that claimed Christ’s death and resurrection were not enough for salvation
  • Deuteropauline Letters
  • Ephesians
  • - Likely the work of a secretary or admirer of Paul
  • - Draws out more explicitly some of the themes in ` Colossians
  • - More of an essay than a letter
  • Body has two main divisions:
  • 1.) Mystery of salvation related to the Church
  • 2.) Paul’s exhortation to Christians to live in unity
  • Deuteropauline Letters
  • 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus
  • - “Pastoral Letters”
  • • Written by one pastor (shepherd) to two other pastors
  • Addressed to individuals
  • • Give advice on Church leadership
  • Deuteropauline Letters
  • Key Teachings of Titus and 1 Timothy:
  • - Severe warning against false teachings and teachers - Many practical instructions for Church organization - Instructions for Christian worship - Instructions for Christian living
  • - 2 Timothy is more of a personal letter, a last testament from the older apostle to Timothy
  • Asceticism
  • • Deuteropauline
  • • Gnosticism
  • • Pseudonymous
  • Tarsus
  • Prison Letters
  • Thessalonians
  • 3 Journeys
  • 1 Corinthians 13
  • Vocabulary


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