Cahsee homework



Download 183 Kb.
Page3/3
Date08.12.2018
Size183 Kb.
1   2   3

Point of View


To properly understand passages you read, it’s important to analyze the point of view of the passage’s narrator. The point of view is the perspective of the character who tells the story. The narrator is NOT necessarily the author—don’t make this mistake. After you determine whose point of view the passage is told from, consider the unique insights and attitudes that person has. When this passage asks about POV, it asks for the insights and attitude, not the 1st, 3rd limited, or omniscient.

Characterization


Characters are the people who perform the actions in the story. In order to fully understand the passage, you should pay attention to characterization – the combination of details about the personality and motives of a person in the story.

Directions: Read the passages below and then answer the following questions about point of view.

Finding the Perfect Speaker


Graduation day for the senior class at Davis High School was coming up in three short months, and the student council had yet to decide on who the graduation speaker should be. As senior class president, I decided to call a meeting to discuss our options.

Jamaal was the first to offer a suggestion. “I think we should have the mayor speak,” he said. “He’s a great leader, and we could learn a lot from him.”

Teresa rolled her eyes. “Come on, Jamaal. The mayor is your uncle,” she said “That’s the only reason you’re suggesting that.”

Jamaal seemed a little embarrassed when Teresa said this. I didn’t want him to feel bad, so I interrupted the discussion and asked if anyone else had a suggestion.

Julia raised her hand. “I don’t have a specific speaker in mind, but I think it would be great if we get somebody who graduated from this school,” Julia said.

Many students agreed that this was a good idea. Even Jamaal agreed.

“Okay, then,” I said. “I have three people in mind: Morgan Smith, Doug O’Brien, and Danzy Farber. Does anybody have any more suggestions?”

A few students said that each speaker was a great choice, and nobody had another name to suggest.

Morgan Smith had graduated high school five years ago. While a senior in college, she published her first book, a memoir about her high school years. She wrote, produced, and promoted the book all by herself, and she sold quite a few copies.

It was even up for some awards. Smith had previously offered to return to the school at any time to run some workshops. Currently, she was spending most of her time writing her second book, so she had a flexible schedule. She was my personal choice because I wanted to become a writer too.

Doug O’Brien was the football team’s quarterback seven years ago. He had gone on to a great career at a local college and was now an assistant coach at the same college. Graduation came during the off-season, so it seemed like O’Brien would be available as well.

Danzy Farber, who had graduated from our high school twelve years earlier, was a molecular biologist who had recently become a full-time research fellow at Columbia University in New York. Her latest project was scheduled to begin the week before graduation. She probably had the busiest schedule of the three potential speakers.

Now it was time to vote. The results were close, but Morgan Smith received nine votes to seven over Doug O’Brien and Danzy Farber. I went to Principal Howard’s office and told her that we wanted Morgan Smith to be our graduation speaker.

“Good Choice, David,” Principal Howard said. “It will be great to catch up with her.”



  1. Who is the narrator of the story? Write your answer below and underline the details in the passage that support your answer, marking them with the number 1.

__________________________________________________

__________________________________________________



  1. What is the narrator’s point of view regarding the choice of Morgan Smith? Write your answer below and underline the details in the passage that support your answer, marking them with the number 2.

__________________________________________________

__________________________________________________



  1. Why did Teresa think Jamaal suggested that the mayor should be the speaker? Write your answer below and underline the details in the passage that support your answer, marking them with the number 3.

__________________________________________________

__________________________________________________



  1. What is the most likely reason that Jamaal was embarrassed? Write your answer below and underline the details in the passage that support your answer, marking them with the number 4.

__________________________________________________

__________________________________________________



  1. What is Principal Howard’s point of view about the choice of Morgan Smith? Write your answer below and underline the details in the passage that support your answer, marking them with the number 5.

__________________________________________________

__________________________________________________



Directions: For the following questions, determine which character in the story would most likely say or think the following quotations.

  1. That’s not the only reason I’m suggesting the mayor!” _________________________________________________

  2. Thanks, Principal Howard. I’m really excited about Morgan Smith too.” ________________________________

  3. Jamaal, you did this last year too, when you suggested that your brother’s band should play at the junior prom.” _________________________________________________

  4. I’ve got some of my own writing I’d like to show Morgan Smith. I’m going to work hard to get all that together by graduation.” ______________________________________

  5. Does anybody have anything to add before we vote on the speaker?” _____________________________________

  6. I’m so flattered that you have asked me to be the speaker. I’d love to come back to Davis High School. Do you want me to bring copies of my book?” _________________________________________________

  7. I’m going to make my plane reservations tomorrow, Principal Howard. I can’t wait to see you and everybody else.” ____________________________________________

  8. This worked out well. I’m glad I called this meeting.” _________________________________________________

Directions: Read the biographical passage below and then answer the following questions about characterization

The Great Harry Houdini

Harry Houdini was a famous escape artist and magician. He was born in Budapest, Hungary, on March 24, 1874, although later in life he would claim to have been born in Appleton, Wisconsin. His real name was Ehrich Weiss, and he moved to America with his family when he was four years old.

Houdini’s father was a rabbi, and his family was poor. Houdini was sent to work at the age of eight, selling newspapers and shining shoes. When he was only thirteen years old, he left home to make his own way in the world. He moved to New York City and got a job that paid enough to bring his family to the city with him. Houdini was a great athlete, excelling especially in swimming and track.

It was in New York City that Houdini learned magic. He began with simple card tricks, calling himself “the king of Cards.” Soon Houdini picked up some trick in which he escaped from handcuffs. He even performed at the Chicago World’s Fair at Coney Island, where he met Wilhelmina Beatrice Rahner, who would become his wife. They were married only two weeks after they met! Mrs. Houdini joined the acts as Houdini’s assistant, and they took their show on the road, traveling the country and perfecting Houdini’s tricks.

Over time Houdini’s escape act moved beyond mere handcuffs. As they traveled from town to town, Houdini and his wife drew crowds by challenging audiences to devise a restraint from which Houdini could not escape. It couldn’t be done. He escaped from handcuffs, leg irons, straight jackets, jail and prison cells, a mail pouch (without tearing the paper!), a giant football, an iron boiler, milk cans, coffins, and a water-torture cell. Even more amazing, no one could figure out how he managed his escapes, even though he performed them in full view of the audience, which was allowed to inspect the restraints when Houdini finished.

In 1899 a promoter named Martin Beck saw one of Houdini’s amazing performances. He urged Houdini to focus on a career as an escape artist. Houdini took his advice, and Beck booked Houdini for numerous shows. Soon Houdini was headlining venues all over the United States.

Houdini became a star in the United States and in Europe. He was wealthy enough to buy an entire building in Manhattan for his residence, and he took up the newly invented daredevil sport of aviation in his leisure time. But most of his time was spent training for his great escapes. He would practice holding his breath and maneuvering in tight spaces.

Houdini also starred in silent films to bring his magic to an even wider audience. In fact, Houdini is the only magician in history to star in five feature films. However, it is his work as an escape artist that most people remember now, many years after his death.

It has been rumored that Houdini died in a daring escape gone wrong, but that is a myth. In fact, he died of complications from a ruptured appendix, on October 31, 1926. He had popularized the art of magic and was beloved by people all over the world who enjoyed his performances and daring escapes.


  1. What is Harry Houdini best known for? Write your answer below and underline the details in the passage that support your answer, marking them with the number 14.

________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________



  1. How did Houdini’s wife, Wilhelmina Beatrice Rahner, likely feel about her husband’s performances? Write your answer below and underline the details in the passage that support your answer, marking them with the number 15.

________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________



  1. How did Houdini feel about the advice from Martin Beck? Write your answer below and underline the details in the passage that support your answer, marking them with the number 16.

________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________



  1. How did Martin Beck likely feel about the first Houdini performance he saw? Write your answer below and underline the details in the passage that support your answer, marking them with the number 17.

________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________



  1. Why did Houdini start working at such a young age? Write your answer below and underline the details in the passage that support your answer, marking them with the number 18.

__________________________________________________

__________________________________________________



Unit One: Literary Response & Analysis Differentiation

Assignment #7 (Strand)

Due: Friday, 20 January 2012

Standards Addressed: LRA3.1; LRA3.5; LRA3.6; LRA3.7

ESLR: Resourceful Learner – Take responsibility for learning

Directions: Read the passage and answer questions 1-4. Circle the correct answer and answer any additional questions asked of you, following the directions provided.

Acting Up

By J. Kaplan



Write something.

“Huh?”


Write something.

“Ugh.”


My ninth grade teacher was telling me to write something about what I had just read, and my mind was gazing out across greener pastures. I was staring at the football field, through my high school English class’s window, daydreaming about what “pearls of wisdom” I should transcribe to my notebook paper, when all I really wanted to do was “to act.”

When I was a kid, and I read a book, all I could do was picture the book as a movie. And, naturally, I was the star. (Ah, to see my name in lights!) Indeed, all my life, I have thought cinematically. When I walk into a room, my immediate thoughts are how would this look on the big screen? What would this person say? Where would I put this chair? Can I make this more entertaining?

It is terrible to think this way. You spend half your time not really listening to what people have to say. And the other half rearranging their wardrobe.

Write something.

I would like to write something, but what I really like to do is “act.” I think it’s genetic.

I was born with a predisposition to sing and dance. I came out of the womb wearing a top hat and cane, ready to softshoe my way into the hearts of my relatives. My school years were spent playing the clarinet (not my forte), singing in choruses (you didn’t miss anything), and putting on plays. For my high school senior year, I was voted “Most Dramatic.” I was not surprised, though. I had performed for my high school a monologue entitled “The Night the Bed Fell” by James Thurber, and I had been—as they say in showbiz—a hit.

I remember the day vividly. As members of the high school debate team, we were forever going to district and state competitions. One category that I relished was dramatic interpretation. My debate teacher, Mrs. Spector (dear Mrs. Spector, I remember the time when we jumped in the school’s indoor pool with our clothes on, but that’s another story), selected the piece for me, knowing my penchant for humor and my desire to entertain. She felt this Thurber piece, about a series of misadventures that lead everyone to believe that an earthquake has occurred, instead of a bed falling, was the perfect vehicle for my dramatic debut.

She was right.

There I was on the high school stage, standing near a single chair (You know the kind. They are wooden, sturdy, and usually found in turn of the century libraries), bathed in a glow of bright light. And a sea of people. My classmates. All staring in great anticipation.

“What’s this crazy kid going to do now?”

Until then, my classmates had only seen me in bit parts. I was not the Tom Cruise of my high school. I had been in school plays, but nothing really big. I was the character actor to the right, the nerdy kid in stage makeup, looking like someone’s long-lost relative.

I was no heartthrob.

Most high schools present Spring musicals, where good looking singers and dancers are held at a premium. And although I love to sing and dance, enthusiasm is my real talent.

Mrs. Spector, though, gave me my big break.

As soon as the audience quieted, I began.

It was awesome.

I held my classmates in the palm of my hand. They were glued to my every word. They sighed and laughed appropriately. They understood what I was saying (believe me, Thurber is not easy to follow), and moreover, they listened to me. No one else. Just me.

I was in seventh heaven.

Until this day, I still remember the final ovation.

I remember the applause sweeping over me like a wave of righteousness. Each clap, underlining what I already knew.



Acting is my thing.

  1. How does the reader know that the story is a dramatic monologue?

    1. The narrator is the only speaker.

    2. The story is about the narrator’s love of acting.

    3. The narrator has a vivid personality.

    4. The story is based on the narrator’s experiences.

Define dramatic monologue.

_____________________________________________

  1. What is the main effect produced by the repetition of the phrase Write something?

    1. It reminds the reader that the narrator is daydreaming.

    2. It proves that the narrator has finished his homework.

    3. It emphasizes the importance that writing has to an actor.

    4. It makes the story easier for the reader to understand.

Use process of elimination (P.O.E.) to answer this question. On the lines below, briefly explain how you were able to eliminate the three wrong answers.

Wrong Answer #1 ________________________________________________

Wrong Answer #2 ________________________________________________

Wrong Answer #3 ________________________________________________

  1. Which statement BEST describes what happens in the story?

    1. A teacher nurtures a talented writer.

    2. A teacher gives students an impossible assignment.

    3. A student avoids classwork by daydreaming.

    4. A student gains confidence in his abilities by performing.

In your own words explain why you chose your answer.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

  1. What does the use of flashbacks accomplish in “Acting Up”?

    1. makes the narrator seem dreamy and unrealistic

    2. shows the reader what the narrator was like as a child

    3. allows the narrator to list his achievements

    4. gives the reader more insight into the narrator’s character


In your own words explain why you chose your answer.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Define flashback.

________________________________________________



Unit One: Literary Response & Analysis Differentiation

Assignment #8 (Strand)

Due: Monday, 23 January 2012

Standards Addressed: LRA3.1; LRA3.3; LRA3.4

ESLR: Resourceful Learner – Take responsibility for learning

Directions: Read the article and answer questions 1-3. Circle the correct answer and answer any additional questions asked of you, following the directions provided.

Hiking Trip

“I never wanted to come on this stupid old hiking trip anyway!” His voice echoed, shrill and panicked, across the narrow canyon. His father stopped, chest heaving with the effort of the climb, and turned to look at the boy.

“This is hard on you, son, I know. But you’ve got to come through with courage and a level head.”

“But I’m scared! I don’t even want to have courage!” he retorted. He jerked his head the other way and wiped his eyes across his arm.

“If not courage, fine,” his father replied sternly. “Then have enough love for your brother to think this through!” He pulled a bandana from his back pocket and tied it around his neck. Then he gently placed his hand on the boy’s shoulder and continued, more softly this time. “Now, I don’t know if I can make it without stopping every so often. And we just don’t have the time to stop. You’re young, but you’re strong and fast. Do you remember the way back from here to the road, if you had to go alone?”

Jeff flashed back to the agonizing scene of his seventeen-year-old brother at their campsite that morning. He’d been bitten by a snake yesterday during a rough hike through very rocky terrain. By the time they returned to their tents, he was limping badly. Then this morning he couldn’t put on his boots, and the pain seemed to be getting worse. He needed medical attention right away, so leaving him there was their only choice.

“Jeffrey? Jeffrey, could you do it? Could you make it to the road without me if you had to?”

Jeff blinked and looked past his father’s eyes to the end of the canyon, several miles away. He nodded slowly as the path and the plan began to take hold in his mind. “What was the name of that little town we stopped in to get matches, Dad?”

His father smiled and responded, “Flint. After we left Flint, we parked at the side of the road a few miles out of town. When you see which way our car is facing, you’ll know that the town is back the other direction.” Jeff thought about this and then nodded. They both drank water and then continued scrambling over the rocks.

Nothing was as pretty as it had seemed when they first hiked this way to their campsite. Before, the boulders and rocks had been an interesting challenge. Now, they were obstacles that threatened their footing and their velocity. Overhanging limbs had earlier been natural curiosities in the cliffs. But now they were nature’s weapons, slapping and scratching the boy and the man who crashed by and pushed through as quickly as they could.

Stone by stone, they made their way up the canyon. Jeff’s father grew smaller and smaller in the distance. “He must be stopping a lot,” Jeff thought. He waved to him from a bend in the canyon wall. His father waved back. Jeff turned and made the final ascent up an easier slope toward the road and spotted his father’s car. He lurched toward it, half stumbling, and leaned on the hood, breathless.

“Can’t stop,” he thought. “Mark’s in big trouble. Gotta keep going.” The fast, loud thudding in his ears was deafening, and as he pulled himself upright, he was surprised as a car sped by, heading toward Flint. “Hey, mister!” he shouted, waving both arms. He began to walk, faster and faster until he was jogging. Then he quickly crossed the highway and broke into a full-speed run, holding his left arm straight out, his thumb up.

His chest was burning with every breath when he suddenly heard several loud honks from behind. He turned as the brakes squealed and saw “Bob’s Towing & Repair, Flint” right behind him. “Jump in, boy! What’s up?” Jeff explained between gasps as the truck picked up speed. The driver reached for his two-way radio as soon as he heard about Mark. “Better get the helicopter in there,” he seemed to be shouting into his hand. But Jeff wasn’t sure about that because everything got fuzzy and then went black and quiet.

Hours later, Jeff opened his eyes to find strange surroundings and his father on a chair nearby.

“You’re a hero, son,” his father said with a smile. “You saved Mark.”

“What happened?” Jeff asked through a wide yawn. “Where are we?”

“This is a motel room in Flint. You made it into town and sent the helicopter into the canyon after Mark. I can’t tell you how happy I was when I saw it overhead. I’m so proud of you!”

Jeff sat up suddenly. “Where’s Mark? Is he OK?”

“They airlifted him out and got him to the hospital. His leg’s still in bad shape, but he’s going to be just fine in a couple of days. Thanks to you, son.”

Jeff’s worried face relaxed as his father spoke. “How about you, Dad? How did you get out?”

“Well, I finally hiked myself out of that canyon and to the road. I won’t be going back there any time soon. That’s for sure. Anyway, I couldn’t see the car, and as I headed for Flint, I got lucky and was able to hitch a ride from a fellow named Bob in a tow truck.”



Jeff laughed out loud. “I guess Bob makes a good living going up and down that road. I hope you gave him a good tip, Dad!”

  1. This passage is an example of which of the following genres of writing?

    1. a narrative short story

    2. an informational text

    3. a persuasive essay

    4. a biographical essay

In your own words explain why you chose your answer.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Define genre.

_____________________________________________

  1. Which of the following sentences BEST explains Jeff’s biggest problem in the passage?

    1. He needed to face his fear of losing his father’s respect.

    2. He needed to find someone to take him to the town of Flint.

    3. He needed to climb the rock-covered hill to get to the top.

    4. He needed to face his fear in order to help his brother.

In your own words explain why you chose your answer.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

  1. What kind of person is Jeff’s father in the passage?

    1. understanding and motivating

    2. aggressive and annoying

    3. humorous and entertaining

    4. impatient and anxious

Use process of elimination (P.O.E.) to answer this question. On the lines below, briefly explain how you were able to eliminate the three wrong answers.

Wrong Answer #1 ________________________________________________

Wrong Answer #2 ________________________________________________

Wrong Answer #3 ________________________________________________

STUDY FOR YOUR WORD DISSECTION TEST!!!!!!


Directory: cms -> lib5 -> CA01000471 -> Centricity -> Domain -> 2253
2253 -> Due: Tuesday, 14 February 2012 All homework must be completed in its entirety
2253 -> Due: Tuesday, 14 February 2012 All homework must be completed in its entirety
2253 -> Due: Monday, 12 March 2012 All homework must be completed in its entirety
2253 -> Standard w 3 – Write expository compositions, including analytical essays and research reports
2253 -> Grammar Review: Written and Oral English Language Conventions cahsee preparation: Unit One Standard(s) Addressed
2253 -> Organizer #3 of 4 Writing Strategies Differentiation Due: Tuesday, 28 February 2012 All homework must be completed in its entirety
2253 -> Homework Organizer #4 of 4 Writing Strategies Differentiation Due: Monday, 12 March 2012 All homework must be completed in its entirety
2253 -> Grammar Review: Written and Oral English Language Conventions cahsee preparation: Unit Two Standard(s) Addressed
2253 -> Organizer #1 of 4 Writing Strategies Differentiation Due: Tuesday, 24 January 2012 All homework must be completed in its entirety
2253 -> Cahsee homework


Share with your friends:
1   2   3


The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2019
send message

    Main page