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CAHSEE Homework Organizer #1 of 4

Literary Response and Analysis Differentiation

Due: Tuesday, 24 January 2012

All homework must be completed in its entirety. Incomplete or incorrect homework will not receive any points! Random homework checks will be completed at the teacher’s discretion and students will be expected to have all assigned work complete and ready to be stamped at any time.


Assignment

Number

Assignment Description

Due Date

Assignment Value

Points Earned

1

A Day Away” Practice Test Questions

  • All questions answered according to the directions.

Wednesday, 1/11

25




2

Literary Terms Quiz

  • All questions answered according to the directions.

Thursday, 1/12

25




3

“White Fang” Practice Test Questions

  • All questions answered according to the directions.

Friday, 1/13

25




4

Making Inferences

  • All questions answered according to the directions.

Tuesday, 1/17

25




5

“Going Home” Practice Test Questions

  • All questions answered according to the directions.

Wednesday, 1/18

25




6

POV and Characterization

  • All questions answered according to the directions.

Thursday, 1/19

25




7

“Acting Up” Practice Test Questions

  • All questions answered according to the directions.

Friday, 1/20

25




8

“Hiking Trip” Practice Test Questions

  • All questions answered according to the directions.

Monday, 1/23

25




9

Answer Key and Self-Reflection

  • All questions answered according to the directions.

  • Attach to the end of this packet.

Tuesday, 1/24

10




10

Grammar Packet

  • 10 Activities completed according to the directions – even if you were absent! (5 points each day)

  • Attach to the end of this packet.

Tuesday, 1/24

50




Total Points Earned

(of 260)








CAHSEE Unit One: Literary Response & Analysis Differentiation

Assignment #1 (Strand)

Due: Wednesday, 11 January 2012

Standards Addressed: LRA3.1; 3.4; 3.5; 3.7; 3.8; 3.9; RC2.5; WS1.2

ESLR: Resourceful Learner – Take responsibility for learning; Study Effectively

Directions: Read the passage and answer questions 1 through 9. Circle the correct answer and answer any additional questions asked of you, following the directions provided.

A Day Away

By Maya Angelou



Most people today know Maya Angelou as one of America’s most important poets. One of her stories, “Georgia, Georgia,” was the first story by an African-American woman to be made into a television movie. Angelou also wrote the screenplay for the movie All Day Long and even directed it. The variety, quality, and passion of her work continue to inspire people today.

We often think that our affairs, great or small, must be tended continuously and in detail, or our world will disintegrate, and we will lose our places in the universe. That is not true, or if it is true, then our situations were so temporary that they would have collapsed anyway.

Once a year or so I give myself a day away. On the eve of my day of absence, I begin to unwrap the bonds which hold me in harness. I inform housemates, my family and close friends that I will not be reachable for twenty-four hours; then I disengage the telephone. I turn the radio dial to an all-music station, preferably one which plays the soothing golden oldies. I sit for at least an hour in a very hot tub; then I lay out my clothes in preparation for my morning escape, and knowing that nothing will disturb me, I sleep the sleep of the just.

In the morning I wake naturally, for I will have set no clock, nor informed my body timepiece when it should alarm. I dress in comfortable shoes and casual clothes and leave my house going no place. If I am living in a city, I wander streets, window-shop, or gaze at buildings. I enter and leave public parks, libraries, the lobbies of skyscrapers, and movie houses. I stay in no place for very long.

On the getaway day I try for amnesia. I do not want to know my name, where I live, or how many dire responsibilities rest on my shoulders. I detest encountering even the closest friend, for then I am reminded of who I am, and the circumstances of my life, which I want to forget for a while.

Every person needs to take one day away. A day in which one consciously separates the past from the future. Jobs, family, employers, and friends can exist one day without any one of us, and if our egos permit us to confess, they could exist eternally in our absence.

Each person deserves a day away in which no problems are confronted, no solutions searched for. Each of us needs to withdraw from the cares which will not withdraw from us. We need hours of aimless wandering or spaces of time sitting on park benches, observing the mysterious world of ants and the canopy of treetops.

If we step away for a time, we are not, as many may think and some will accuse, being irresponsible, but rather we are preparing ourselves to more ably perform our duties and discharge our obligations.

When I return home, I am always surprised to find some questions I sought to evade had been answered and some entanglements I had hoped to flee had become unraveled in my absence.



A day away acts as a spring tonic. It can dispel rancor, transform indecision, and renew the spirit.

  1. What is the narrator’s main purpose in this passage?

    1. to entertain readers with a story of an unusual day

    2. to inform readers how to organize a day away from home

    3. to persuade readers to take some time for themselves

    4. to describe to readers what it is like to rediscover a city

The main purposes for writing are to entertain, to persuade, and to inform. Which of these best describes the reason this passage was written?

__________________________________________________

In your own words, explain how you know.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

  1. Which sentence below is an example of a simile?

    1. I will have set no clock . . .

    2. I do not want to know my name . . .

    3. We need hours of aimless wandering . . .

    4. A day away acts as a spring tonic.

Circle the word in the answer choice that shows you it is a simile, not a metaphor. What two things are being compared?

________________________________________________


  1. The words casual, wander, and gaze in paragraph 3 suggest a feeling of—

    1. determination.

    2. solitude.

    3. bewilderment.

    4. relaxation.


Which one of your literary terms means “the feelings associated with a word”?

________________________________________________

  1. The narrator MOST likely laid out her clothes the night before her day away so that she—

    1. wouldn't forget what she wanted to wear.

    2. wouldn't have to make a decision in the morning.

    3. would be able to sleep late in the morning.

    4. would be as stylishly dressed as possible.

In your own words explain why you chose your answer.

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

  1. Which BEST describes the narrator’s tone in the second half of the passage?

    1. persuasive

    2. humorous

    3. sarcastic

    4. frustrated


In your own words explain why you chose your answer.

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

  1. Which sentence from the passage is an example of figurative language?

    1. Once a year or so I give myself a day away.

    2. On the eve of my day of absence, I begin to unwrap the bonds which hold me in harness.

    3. I enter and leave public parks, libraries, the lobbies of skyscrapers, and movie houses.

    4. It can dispel rancor, transform indecision, and renew the spirit.


Define figurative language.

________________________________________________



  1. In which sentence from the passage does the narrator acknowledge those who disagree with her main argument?

    1. I inform housemates, my family and close friends that I will not be reachable for twenty-four hours; then I disengage the telephone.

    2. I detest encountering even the closest friend, for then I am reminded of who I am, and the circumstances of my life, which I want to forget for a while.

    3. If we step away for a time, we are not, as many may think and some will accuse, being irresponsible, but rather we are preparing ourselves to more ably perform our duties and discharge our obligations.

    4. When I return home, I am always surprised to find some questions I sought to evade had been answered and some entanglements I had hoped to flee had become unraveled in my absence.


What is the literary term for acknowledging the argument of those who disagree with you?

________________________________________________

  1. Which statement from the passage BEST describes the narrator’s motivation for “a day away”?

    1. . . . we will lose our places in the universe.

    2. . . . I sleep the sleep of the just.

    3. . . . I want to forget for a while.

    4. . . . friends can exist one day without any one of us.

In your own words explain why you chose your answer.

________________________________________________

________________________________________________


  1. Which of the following is the main theme of the passage?

    1. Self-energizing oneself is necessary.

    2. Time is of the essence.

    3. Problems will solve themselves.

    4. A single decision has many consequences.

In your own words explain why you chose your answer.

________________________________________________

________________________________________________


Assignment #2: Literary Terms Quiz

Due: Thursday, 12 January 2012

Standards Addressed: Review of ALL Literary Response and Analysis Standards

ESLR: Resourceful Learner – Take responsibility for learning

Rationale: Over the next couple months, we will be reviewing literary terms on a regular basis. It is essential on the CAHSEE that you not only know what each of these literary terms means, but that you are able to identify examples of them in passages.

Directions: Circle the letter that best answers each of the following questions. If you have forgotten what one of these literary terms means, look it up in your CAHSEE Literary Terms packet!

  1. After reading the story “Where Have You Gone, Charming Billy?” we read several articles that expanded upon some of the ideas and issues presented by the author. When discussing these articles, we related them back to the original story in order to better understand the author’s intention. What is the literary term for what we did with all of this information?

    1. foreshadowing

    2. chronological order

    3. synthesize

    4. soliloquy

  1. When writing a research paper it is often helpful to use your primary and secondary sources as resources for furthering your investigation. Consulting the __________ or __________ is one way to find out where to look for more information.

    1. dialect; colloquialisms

    2. bibliography; Works Cited

    3. indirect characterization; direct characterization

    4. dialogue; soliloquy

  1. If a character seems real or alive to us as readers we can assume that the author has created a __________ character. These characters are usually the ones who learn lessons or grow in some way throughout the course of the story.

    1. flat character

    2. round character

    3. atmosphere (mood)

    4. synthesize

  1. “She didn’t never let nobody touch her quilts.”

“I was thinkin’ ‘bout marryin’ him.

These statements are both examples of:



    1. flat characters

    2. character traits

    3. dialect

    4. direct characterization

  1. “It was an ominous day; a bank of dark clouds loomed in the distance, threatening to invade the city and unleash their fury.” An author might use this sentence as a technique called:

    1. foreshadowing

    2. chronological order

    3. synthesize

    4. direct characterization

  1. “He saw a dark woman—in her twenties, perhaps—who was slender and shy. Her dress was simple, one of her stockings drooped at the ankle, but her voice was soft and he was willing to give her a chance at the job.” The description of this character is an example of:

    1. dialogue

    2. secondary source

    3. flashforward

    4. indirect characterization

  1. A short story written by Isaac Bashevis Singer begins with the sentence, “I am Gimpel the fool.” This is an example of:

    1. indirect characterization

    2. cause/effect

    3. direct characterization

    4. complication



  1. A __________ character usually has only one or two defining characteristics. “The mysterious outsider who dressed in black” might be one example of this character type.

    1. flat character

    2. round character

    3. tone

    4. dialogue

  1. “Pardon me, ma’am, but I’ve been seein’ you out here ever’day for weeks and I jest got up my nerve to come over and speak to you. . . .” The underlined words are examples of __________, or local expressions.

    1. tone

    2. synthesize

    3. inference

    4. colloquialisms

  1. In a newspaper article titled, “Stunned Homeowners Hope to Rebuild in Scripps Ranch,” journalists Dave McKibben and Ann M. Simmons write, “Fire Department officials said at least 150 homes, most of them in the million dollar range, were destroyed in Scripps Ranch.” This kind of information is considered to be a:

    1. secondary source

    2. primary source

    3. dialect

    4. foreshadowing

  1. The article “The Day the Clowns Cried” is an account of the worst circus tragedy in history. In order for the reader to understand the significance of this event it is important for the author to use words that will influence the reader’s reaction in a certain way. The author’s use of words contributes to the overall _____________ of the article.

    1. foreshadowing

    2. round character

    3. dialogue

    4. tone

  1. David Letterman, Jay Leno, and Conan O’Brien all begin their shows with these. A __________ occurs when a character (in this case a host) speaks directly to the audience.

    1. dramatic monologue

    2. flat character

    3. flashback

    4. colloquialism

  1. In the fairy tale “Snow White and the Seven Dwarves,” the queen gives Snow White a poisoned apple. After eating the apple, Snow White falls into a deep sleep. This is an example of:

    1. atmosphere (mood)

    2. flashback

    3. inference

    4. complication

  1. Many actors love to perform William Shakespeare’s works because he uses the __________ in his plays, a literary device that allows an actor to be alone on stage as he speaks directly to the audience.

    1. foreshadowing

    2. tone

    3. soliloquy

    4. indirect characterization

  1. In the novel A Christmas Carol, Ebeneezer Scrooge is visited by three ghosts. One of these ghosts shows Mr. Scrooge what will become of him if he refuses to change his ways. This ghost is used to illustrate the literary device termed:

    1. flashback

    2. flashforward

    3. mood

    4. soliloquy

  1. “In the day time the street was dusty, but at night the dew settled the dust and the old man liked to sit late because he was deaf and now at night it was quiet and he felt the difference.” The old man is noticing a change in:

    1. dialect

    2. flashback

    3. indirect characterization

    4. atmosphere (mood)

  1. “I saw the fire come up and over the ridge; all I could think was that my dog Lucy was still in the house. I was stuck behind the police ‘Do Not Cross’ line, powerless to save her. I hoped that I would be one of the lucky ones, and that my house would be saved,” Mary tells her friend Sally at school the next day. This is an example of a:

    1. flashforward

    2. indirect characterization

    3. bibliography

    4. primary source



  1. “Last week he tried to commit suicide,” one waiter said.

“Why?”

“He was in despair.”

“What about?”

“Nothing.”

“How do you know it was about nothing?”

“He has plenty of money.”



This passage, taken from Ernest Hemingway’s short story “A Clean, Well-Lighted Place” is an example of:

    1. soliloquy

    2. dialogue

    3. atmosphere (mood)

    4. synthesize

  1. “He understood fully that he might actually be going to die; his arms, maintaining his balance on the ledge were trembling steadily now. And it occurred to him then with all the force of a revelation that, if he fell, all he was ever going to have out of life he would then, abruptly, have had.” In the short story “Content’s of the Dead Man’s Pocket,” Tom’s thoughts reveal:

    1. cause/effect

    2. chronological order

    3. synthesize

    4. mood

  1. The narrator in the short story “Everyday Use” describes herself for the reader: “In real life I am a large, big-boned woman with rough, man-working hands.” From this sentence we make a few guesses about the narrator’s appearance and lifestyle. What is the literary term for these “guesses”?

    1. resolutions

    2. inferences

    3. complications

    4. causes/effects

  1. I am working on an outline for writing my autobiography. I am planning on devoting one chapter to each year of my life. Chapter One will chronicle the first year of my life, Chapter Two will be an account of my second, and so on. Which of these terms best describes my approach to this writing?

    1. complication

    2. cause/effect

    3. inference

    4. chronological order

  1. “Everything went on in the tomblike houses at night now. . . . The tombs, ill-lit by television light, where the people sat like the dead, the gray or multicolored lights touching their faces, but never really touching them.” The author’s use of the underlined words was not accidental. What was he trying to convey?

    1. chronological order

    2. dialogue

    3. mood

    4. secondary source

  1. “I remember my tenth birthday like it was yesterday . . .” If I were to begin my autobiographical narrative with this phrase, you might assume that I was planning to use this literary device to tell my story:

    1. flashback

    2. flashforward

    3. complication

    4. cause/effect

  1. A strong commitment to family, a lazy eye, a love of dark chocolate, a willingness to work hard. These are examples of:

    1. primary sources

    2. causes/effects

    3. character traits

    4. mood

  1. These characters are usually known by their character “type”: Prince Charming in fairy tales, the mad scientist of horror movies, the loyal sidekick in comedy films.

    1. expositions

    2. round characters

    3. primary sources

    4. stock characters


Unit One: Literary Response & Analysis Differentiation

Assignment #3 (Strand)

Due: Friday, 13 January 2012

Standards Addressed: 10LRA3.1; 10LRA3.3; 10LRA3.4

ESLR: Resourceful Learner – Take responsibility for learning

Directions: Read the passage and answer questions 1-6. Circle the correct answer and answer any additional questions asked of you, following the directions provided.

White Fang

By Jack London



In the fall of the year when the days were shortening and the bite of the frost was coming into the air, White Fang got his chance for liberty. For several days, there had been a great hubbub in the village. The summer camp was being dismantled, and the tribe, bag and baggage, was preparing to go off to the fall hunting. White Fang watched it all with eager eyes, and when the tepees began to come down and the canoes were loading at the bank, he understood. Already the canoes were departing, and some had disappeared down the river.

Quite deliberately, he determined to stay behind. He waited his opportunity to slink out of the camp to the woods. Here in the running stream where ice was beginning to form, he hid his trail. Then he crawled into the heart of a dense thicket and waited. The time passed by and he slept intermittently for hours. Then he was aroused by Gray Beaver’s voice calling him by name. There were other voices. White Fang could hear Gray Beaver’s squaw taking part in the search, and Mitsah, who was Gray Beaver’s son.

White Fang trembled with fear, and though the impulse came to crawl out of his hiding-place, he resisted it. After a time the voices died away, and some time after that he crept out to enjoy the success of his undertaking. Darkness was coming on, and for awhile he played about among the trees, pleasuring his freedom. Then, and quite suddenly, he became aware of loneliness. He sat down to consider, listening to the silence of the frost and perturbed by it. That nothing moved, nor sounded, seemed ominous. He felt the lurking of danger, unseen and unguessed. He was suspicious of the looming bulks of the trees and the dark shadows that might conceal all manner of perilous things.

Then it was cold. Here was no warm side of a tepee against which to snuggle. The frost was in his feet, and he kept lifting first one forefoot and then the other. He curved his bushy tail around to cover them, and at the same time he saw a vision. There was nothing strange about it. Upon his inward sight was impressed a succession of memory-pictures. He saw the camp again, the tepees, and the blaze of fires. He heard the shrill voice of the women, the gruff basses of the men, and the snarling of the dogs. He was hungry, and he remembered pieces of meat and fish that had been thrown him. Here was no meat, nothing but a threatening and inedible silence.

His bondage had softened him. Irresponsibility had weakened him. He had forgotten how to shift for himself. The night yawned about him. His senses, accustomed to the hum and bustle of the camp, used to the continuous impact of sights and sounds, were now left idle. There was nothing to do, nothing to see nor hear. They strained to catch some interruption of the silence and immobility of nature. They were appalled by inaction and by the feel of something terrible impending.

He gave a great start of fright. A colossal and formless something was rushing across the field of his vision. It was a tree-shadow flung by the moon, from whose face the clouds had been brushed away. Reassured, he whimpered softly; then he suppressed the whimper for fear that it might attract the attention of the lurking dangers.



A tree, contracting in the cool of night, made a loud noise. It was directly above him. He yelped in his fright. A panic seized him, and he ran madly toward the village. He knew an overpowering desire for the protection and companionship of man. In his nostrils was the smell of the camp smoke. In his ears the camp sounds and cries were ringing loud. He passed out of the forest and into the moonlit open where there were no shadows nor darkness. But no village greeted his eyes. He had forgotten. The village had gone away.

  1. This passage is BEST described as—

    1. fiction

    2. biography

    3. article

    4. essay

In your own words explain why you chose your answer.

________________________________________________

________________________________________________
What literary term means “forms of literature”?

_____________________________________________


  1. Which of the following BEST describes the relationship between Gray Beaver and White Fang?

    1. Gray Beaver is White Fang’s owner.

    2. Gray Beaver is White Fang’s brother.

    3. Gray Beaver and White Fang are members of the same tribe.

    4. Gray Beaver and White Fang are father and son.

Use process of elimination (P.O.E.) to answer this question. On the lines below, briefly explain how you were able to eliminate the three wrong answers.

Wrong Answer #1 ________________________________________________

Wrong Answer #2 ________________________________________________

Wrong Answer #3 ________________________________________________

Who are Gray Beaver and White Fang? How do you know?

________________________________________________

  1. Which of these sentences from the story BEST illustrates the wild side of White Fang’s nature?

    1. “He knew an overpowering desire for the protection and companionship of man.”

    2. “Upon his inward sight was impressed a succession of memory-pictures.”

    3. “Here in the running stream where ice was beginning to form, he hid his trail.”

    4. “Then, and quite suddenly, he became aware of loneliness.”


In your own words explain why you chose your answer.

________________________________________________

________________________________________________


  1. How would you describe the mood in the following sentence from the passage?


He was suspicious of the looming bulks of the trees and the dark shadows that might conceal all manner of perilous things.
_____________________________________________

  1. Read the following sentence from the passage.

The frost was in his feet, and he kept lifting first one forefoot and then the other. He curved his bushy tail around to cover them, and at the same time he saw a vision.

What point of view is this passage told from? In your own words, how do you know?

_____________________________________________

_____________________________________________

Is White Fang a person? How do you know?

_____________________________________________

_____________________________________________

  1. Read the following sentence from the passage.

The night yawned about him.

What literary device is this sentence an example of? How do you know?

_____________________________________________

What two things are being compared?

_____________________________________________

Assignment #4: Due Tuesday, 17 January 2012

Making Inferences



Standard: R2.8 – Evaluate the credibility of an author’s argument or defense of a claim by critiquing the relationship between generalizations and evidence and the way in which the author’s intent affects the tone of the text.

ESLR: Resourceful Learner – Take responsibility for learning

Rationale: Writers don’t always come out and say what they mean. You must make inferences based on the information that they give you to figure out exactly what they mean. In this lesson, you will practice making inferences such as conclusions, generalizations, and predictions.

Inferences

When you make an inference, you develop an idea based on given information. An inference involves using the information you have to determine additional information. An inference is like an educated guess. For example, if a weather forecast tells you that your area should expect eighteen inches of snow overnight, you can infer that schools will be closed the next day. The weather forecast did not tell you that schools will close, but you can make an inference about school closings based on the information in the forecast.

Some questions require you to make inferences based on information that is stated in a reading passage. When you make an inference, you should find the information in the text that supports it.

Directions: Read the passages below and then answer the questions that follow.


Directory: cms -> lib5 -> CA01000471 -> Centricity -> Domain -> 2253
2253 -> Due: Tuesday, 14 February 2012 All homework must be completed in its entirety
2253 -> Due: Tuesday, 14 February 2012 All homework must be completed in its entirety
2253 -> Due: Monday, 12 March 2012 All homework must be completed in its entirety
2253 -> Standard w 3 – Write expository compositions, including analytical essays and research reports
2253 -> Grammar Review: Written and Oral English Language Conventions cahsee preparation: Unit One Standard(s) Addressed
2253 -> Organizer #3 of 4 Writing Strategies Differentiation Due: Tuesday, 28 February 2012 All homework must be completed in its entirety
2253 -> Homework Organizer #4 of 4 Writing Strategies Differentiation Due: Monday, 12 March 2012 All homework must be completed in its entirety
2253 -> Grammar Review: Written and Oral English Language Conventions cahsee preparation: Unit Two Standard(s) Addressed
2253 -> Organizer #1 of 4 Writing Strategies Differentiation Due: Tuesday, 24 January 2012 All homework must be completed in its entirety
2253 -> Cahsee homework


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