By: Ms. Susan M. Pojer Horace Greeley hs chappaqua, ny



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  • ISLAM:
  • Submission
  • to the
  • Will of Allah
  • By: Ms. Susan M. Pojer Horace Greeley HS Chappaqua, NY
  • The
  • Judeo-Christian
  • Foundations
  • of Islam
  • Muslims are strict monotheists.
  • They believe in the Judeo- Christian God, which they call Allah.
  • Muslims believe that the Torah and the Bible, like the Qur’an, is the word of God.
  • Abraham’s Genealogy
  • ABRAHAM
  • SARAH
  • HAGAR
  • Isaac
  • Esau
  • Jacob
  • Ishmael
  • 12 Arabian Tribes
  • Adam
  • Noah
  • Abraham
  • Moses
  • Jesus
  • Muhammad
  • The Qur'an:
  • God's Last
  • Revelation
  • The Origins of the Qur’an
  • Muhammad received his first revelation from the angel Gabriel in the Cave of Hira in 610.
  • 622  Hijrah  Muhammed flees Mecca for Medina. * The beginning of the Muslim calendar (1 A.H.)
  • Muhammad’s revelations were compiled into the Qur’an after his death.
  • The Qur’an
  • Muslims believe it contains the word of God.
  • 114 suras (chapters).
  • In the name of Allah, the compassionate, the merciful.
  • Written in Arabic.
  • The
  • Five Pillars
  • of
  • Islam
  • 1. The Shahada
  • 1
  • The testimony.
  • The declaration of faith:
  • There is no god worthy of worship except God, and Muhammad is His Messenger [or Prophet].
  • 2. The Salat
  • 2
  • The mandatory prayers performed 5 times a day: * dawn * noon * late afternoon * sunset * before going to bed
  • Wash before praying.
  • Face Mecca and use a prayer rug.
  • 2. The Salat
  • 2
  • The call to prayer by the muezzin in the minaret.
  • Pray in the mosque on Friday.
  • 3. The Zakat
  • 3
  • Almsgiving (charitable donations).
  • Muslims believe that all things belong to God.
  • Zakat means both “purification” and “growth.”
  • About 2.5% of your income.
  • 4. The Sawm
  • 4
  • Fasting during the holy month of Ramadan.
  • Considered a method of self- purification.
  • No eating or drinking from sunrise to sunset during Ramadan.
  • Eid Mubarak
  • End of the Ramadan holiday.
  • 5. The Hajj
  • 5
  • The pilgrimage to Mecca.
  • Must be done at least once in a Muslim’s lifetime.
  • 2-3 million Muslims make the pilgrimage every year.
  • 5. The Hajj
  • 5
  • Other Islamic Religious Practices
  • Up to four wives allowed at once.
  • No alcohol or pork.
  • No gambling.
  • Sharia  body of Islamic law to regulate daily living.
  • Three holiest cities in Islam: * Mecca, Medina, Jerusalem.
  • Easy to learn and practice.
  • No priesthood.
  • Teaches equality.
  • Non-Muslims, who were “Peoples of the Book,” were allowed religious freedom, but paid additional taxes.
  • Easily “portable”  nomads & trade routes.
  • Jihad (“Holy War”) against pagans and other non-believers (“infidels”).

TEST ESSAY QUESTIONS

  • Explain the way Islam began to fragment along two separate paths (sects). What were these paths, and how were their beliefs different?
  • Explain how Islam was able to spread from Spain to India in a relatively short amount of time, dominating a wide range of territories and societies.
  • What were the major reasons for the decline of both the Umayyad and Abbasid Caliphates? What role did the umma play in this?
  • What was the status of Muslim women? Compare the status of women at the beginning of Islam to their status during the Abbasid Caliphate.


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