Binary encoding systems



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BINARY ENCODING SYSTEMS

A binary code is a way of representing text or computer processor instructions by the use of the binary number system's two-binary digits 0 and 1. This is accomplished by assigning a bit string to each particular symbol or instruction. For example, a binary string of eight binary digits (bits) can represent any of 256 possible values and can therefore correspond to a variety of different symbols, letters or instructions.

This is a computers way of communicating. It uses binary encoding systems for communication within itself and this is the way it takes in instructions in encoded language. We are specifically going to look at various systems of binary encoding .These common examples of character encoding systems include Morse code, the Baudot code, the American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) and Unicode

Morse code was introduced in the 1840s and is used to encode each letter of the Latin alphabet and each Arabic numeral as a series of long and short presses of a telegraph key. Representations of characters encoded using Morse code varied in length.

The Baudot code was created by Émile Baudot in 1870, patented in 1874, modified by Donald Murray in 1901, and standardized by CCITT as International Telegraph Alphabet No. 2 (ITA2) in 1930.ASCII was introduced in 1963 and is a 7-bit encoding scheme used to encode letters, numerals, symbols, and device control codes as fixed-length codes using integers.

IBM's Extended Binary Coded Decimal Interchange Code (EBCDIC) is an 8-bit encoding scheme developed in 1963. EBCDIC (was devised in 1963 and 1964 by IBM and was announced with the release of the IBM System/360 line of mainframe computers. It is an 8-bit character encoding, in contrast to, and developed separately from, the 7-bit ASCII encoding scheme. It was created to extend the existing binary-coded decimal (BCD) interchange code, or BCDIC, which itself was devised as an efficient means of encoding the two zone and number punches on punched cards into 6 bits.



ASCII is the American Standard Code for Information Interchange. There are many variants of this standard, typically to allow different code pages for language encoding, but they all basically follow the same format. ASCII is quite elegant in the way it represents characters, and it is very easy to write code to manipulate upper/lowercase and check for valid data ranges.

ASCII is essentially a 7-bit code which allows the 8th most significant bit (MSB) to be used for error checking, however most modern computer systems tend to use ASCII values of 128 and above for extended character sets. ASCII is the American Standard Code for Information Interchange. There are many variants of this standard, typically to allow different code pages for language encoding, but they all basically follow the same format.

ASCII is quite elegant in the way it represents characters, and it is very easy to write code to manipulate upper/lowercase and check for valid data ranges.



ASCII is essentially a 7-bit code which allows the 8th most significant bit (MSB) to be used for error checking, however most modern computer systems tend to use ASCII values of 128 and above for extended character ASCII.EBCDIC is easier to use on punched cards and included the "cent sign" (¢) character that ASCII does not.
In conclusion encoding systems are very useful in computer communication and we have continued to use them up to date and its development has brought a lot of contribution in the computing world.

REFERENCES

  • Homepage of Michael Goerz – convert_encoding.py

  • Kempf, Karl (1961). Historical Monograph: Electronic Computers Within the Ordnance Corps. Aberdeen Proving Ground (United States Army

  • Stokes, Jon (2007). Encoding systems: An Illustrated Introduction to Microprocessors and Computer Architecture. San Francisco:


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