Backward Unit Design – Planning Document: 5



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Backward Unit Design – Planning Document: 5th Grade, Quarter 2 (with Spanish references for Dual Language Teachers)

Unit Focus Standard Analysis

This is a four week unit of study that focuses on ISSUES OF SLAVERY AND CIVIL RIGHTS through the genre of historical fiction. As students explore this literature, they will chart the themes in the texts, including what they notice about characters and how characters respond to events.  Some themes that may emerge are:  oppression, hope, discrimination, acceptance, perseverance, courage, etc.  This unit will integrate the following standards:


Reading

RL.5.2, RL.5.3, RL.5.9, RI.5.5, RI.5.6, RI.5.8, RI.5.9


Writing and Language

W.5.2a,b,c,d,e; L.5.1a,b,c,d,

Speaking and Listening

SL.5.1a,b,c,d

NM Social Studies Standards

STRAND: History Content Standard I, 5-8 Benchmark 1-C. World, Performance Standards: 4.

Standard Analysis

Standards

Knowledge Needed (Know)

Learning Targets and Student Outcomes (Do)

Suggested Assessment Tasks

Reading:











RL. 5.2 Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text.

  • Need to know how to gather details (evidence).

  • Need to know how to use details from a text to determine a theme in a story, drama, or poem.

  • Need to know types of themes.

  • Need to know how characters in a text respond to challenges or how a speaker in a poem reflects on a topic.

  • Need to know how to summarize a text.

Use details (evidence) to:

  • Identify attributes of a theme.

  • Describe characters’ thoughts, words, and actions. Identify authors’ organizational techniques.

  • Summarize key events.

  • Close reading evidence charts.

  • Sticky note thinking & exit tickets.

  • Graphic organizers.

  • Chalkboard splash with key details that support theme.




RL. 5.3 Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact).

  • Need to know how to gather details (evidence).

  • Need to know how to compare and contrast characters, settings, or events.

  • Need to know how characters respond to events in a story or drama.




Use details (evidence) to:

  • Discuss and write about similarities and differences of characters, settings, or events.

  • Reading response journals / three-column note charts.

  • Close reading evidence charts.

  • Venn diagrams.




RL. 5.9 Compare and contrast stories in the same genre (e.g., mysteries and adventure stories) on their approaches to similar themes and topics.

  • Need to know how to identify attributes of a theme and types of themes.

  • Need to know how to identify differences in storylines in the same genre looking at characters, plot, and setting.

  • Need to know how to compare and contrast details within similar storylines.

Use details (evidence) to:

  • Discuss and write about similarities and differences of characters, settings, or events.

  • Identify authors’ organizational techniques (to reflect on topic).




  • Reading response journals / two-column note charts.

  • Close reading evidence charts.

  • Venn diagrams.




RI.5.5 Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts.

  • Need to know informational text structure:

  • Cause and Effect

  • Sequence/Chronological

  • Problem/Solution

  • Description

  • Compare and Contrast

  • Order of Importance




  • Need to know how to use the text structure to compare and contrast events, ideas, concepts, or information.

Use text structure (evidence from text) to:

  • Discuss and write about similarities and differences in two or more texts.

  • Compare and contrast the ideas, concepts, and information structures of two or more texts

  • Identify authors’ organizational techniques (to reflect on ideas).

  • Draw conclusions from the text parts and determine how they contribute to the whole text.




  • Two-column note charts.

  • Graphic organizers.

  • Sticky note thinking.




RI.5.6 Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.

  • Need to know how to analyze using informational text structure.

  • Need to identify similarities and differences in points of view.

  • Use text structure (evidence from text) to:

  • In writing and discussion, analyze multiple points of view of the same event or topic and differences in points of view.




  • Reading response journals.

  • Sticky note thinking.

  • Two or three column note charts.

  • Venn diagrams.

RI.5.8 Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point(s).

  • Need to be able to identify author’s reasons and evidence.

Use text structure (evidence from text) to:

  • Identify an author’s claim and give evidence to support the author’s reasoning for his/her claim.




  • Reading response journals.

  • Sticky note thinking.




RI.5.9 Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the

subject knowledgeably.



  • Need to look at multiple perspectives on the same topic.

  • Need to collect most important ideas about the topic from multiple texts.

  • Need to write or speak knowledgeably on topic.

Use text structure (evidence from text) to:

  • Collect key ideas from various texts on the same topic.

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the different perspectives about the topic.

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the subject through writing or speaking about it.

  • Develop reasons for how

multiple texts are connected.


  • Reading response journals.

  • Two or three column notes.

  • Sticky note thinking.

  • Speaking notes for presentation.

  • Written essay.




Speaking and Listening:











SL.5.1

Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher led)

with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw

on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.



b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles.

c. Pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others.

d. Review the key ideas expressed and draw conclusions in light of information and knowledge gained from the discussions.

  • Need to know how to discuss grade books/topics in groups.

  • Need to set rules for book/topic discussions.

  • Need to know how to ask/answer questions based on discussions.

  • Draw conclusions based on discussions.

  • Engage in collaborative discussions effectively.

  • Accountable Talk.

  • Talking off sticky notes.

  • Set goals for discussions.

  • Rubric for speaking and listening.

  • Accountable talk stems.

Writing and Language:











W.5.2

Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.



a. Introduce a topic clearly, provide a general observation and focus, and group related information logically; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when

useful to aiding comprehension.



b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.

c. Link ideas within and across categories of information using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., in contrast, especially).

d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.

e. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented.

  • Need to know how informational or expository text is written.

  • Need to know informational text structure:

  • Cause and Effect

  • Sequence/Chronological

  • Problem/Solution

  • Description

  • Compare and Contrast

  • Order of Importance



  • Write an informational or expository piece of writing that demonstrates knowledge of topic, formatting, concrete details, key ideas, and use of precise language and domain-specific vocabulary.

  • Evidence of the writing process.

  • Checklist for informational text writing.

  • Rubric for expository writing.



L.5.1

Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing

or speaking. (Demuestran dominio de las normativas de la gramática del español y su uso al escribirlo o hablarlo)

a. Explain the function of conjunctions, prepositions, and interjections in general and their function in particular sentences.

Explican la función de las conjunciones, preposiciones e interjecciones en general, y su función en oraciones particulares.



b. Form and use the perfect (e.g., I had walked; I have walked; I will have walked) verb tenses. [Forman y usan los tiempos perfectos o verbos compuestos con haber y el participio pasado (ejemplo: Yo había caminado; Yo he caminado; Yo habré caminado)]

c. Use verb tense to convey various times, sequences, states, and conditions.

d. Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense.* [Reconocen y corrigen cambios inapropiados en el tiempo de los verbos (ejemplo: falta de concordancia entre sujeto y verbo; uso incorrecto de pretérito vs. copretérito; falta de uso del subjuntivo]

e. Use correlative conjunctions (e.g., either/or, neither/nor). [Usan las conjunciones correlativas con la forma correcta de negación (ejemplo: Ni esto, ni aquello)]



  • Need to know conventions of standard English grammar and usage:

  • Conjunctions

  • Prepositions

  • Interjections

  • Verb Tenses




  • Incorporate correct English grammar in written and spoken assignments.

  • Exit tickets

  • Writing rubrics







Science/Social Studies:
















STRAND: History Content Standard I: Students are able to identify important people and events in order to analyze significant patterns, relationships, themes, ideas, beliefs, and turning points in New Mexico, United States, and world history in order to understand the complexity of the human experience. Students will:

5-8 Benchmark 1-C. World: compare and contrast major historical eras, events and figures from ancient civilizations to the age of exploration:

Performance Standards: 4. describe the development of slavery as a widespread practice that limits human freedoms and potentials.


  • Need to know about the impact of slavery on historical events and figures throughout history and particularly in the United States.



  • Describe slavery in relation to how it limited human freedom.

  • Discuss historical events that were an outcome of slavery.

  • Compare influential historical figures and their impact on society.


  • Reading response journals.

  • Sticky note thinking.

  • Venn diagrams

  • Graphic organizers.

  • Timelines.







Big Ideas: Enduring Understandings

  • Throughout this unit students will be reading historical fiction and multiple accounts related to Slavery and the Civil Rights Movement. As students explore this literature, they will chart the themes in the texts, including what they notice about characters and how characters respond to events.  Some themes that may emerge are:  oppression, hope, discrimination, acceptance, perseverance, courage, etc. 

  • You will chart the themes, patterns, and organizational structures of text used to convey information and ideas that you see throughout this unit.

  • What patterns are you noticing? (¿Qué patrones ves?)  Students will need practice and experience drawing conclusions as they compare and contrast themes and multiple accounts of the same topic.  In order to do this work, students will need time to “talk”, annotate, and respond to literature.

  • In class discussions, provide students with time to talk about their personal connections to these themes.  Are these themes universal or regional? (¿Estos temas son universales o regionales?) Do we have similar experiences to draw upon? (¿Tenemos experiencias similares en común?)



Essential Questions (“big umbrella” questions):

  • How did key events during the period of Slavery impact the history of our country?

  • How did the abolition of Slavery in the United States lead to the events that culminated in the Civil Rights Movement?

  • How did events of the Civil Rights Movement change our perceptions about race and teach us to treat all people as equal?

Preguntas esenciales:



  • ¿Qué impacto tuvo los eventos durante el periodo de esclavitud en la historia de nuestro país?

  • ¿Qué efecto tuvo la abolición de la esclavitud en los Estados Unidos a los acontecimientos que culminaron en el movimiento de derechos civiles?

  • Piensa en los eventos del movimiento de los derechos civiles, ¿cómo cambio nuestras percepciones de la raza y nos enseño como tratar toda la gente igual?



Guiding Questions (Preguntas Guiadas) (questions that build to understanding of Essential Questions):

  • How does the evidence and structure in text help the reader identify the themes and patterns? (¿Cómo ayuda la evidencia y la estructura del texto reconocer e identificar los temas y patrones?)

  • What does it mean to be a slave? (¿Qué significa ser esclavo/a?)

  • What is abolition / an abolitionist? (¿Qué significa abolición/ un abolicionista? )

  • What are some major historical events that took place during the time of slavery in the U.S.? (¿Cuáles son los acontecimientos históricos principales que pasaron durante el periodo de la esclavitud en los Estados Unidos?)

  • What led to the abolition of slavery? (¿Qué sucedió que llevo a cabo la abolición de la esclavitud?)

  • How did the historical events and figures impact slavery? (¿Qué impacto tuvieron los acontecimientos históricos y figuras en la esclavitud?)

  • After slavery was abolished, what was life like for African Americans in the U.S.? (Después de la abolición de la esclavitud, ¿cómo era la vida para los afro-americanos en los Estados Unidos?)

  • What were key events that initiated the beginning of the Civil Rights Movement? (¿Cuáles fueron los acontecimientos principales que iniciaron el comienzo del movimiento de derechos civiles?)

  • Who were key figures of the Civil Rights Movement? (¿Quiénes fueron las personas principales del movimiento de derechos civiles?)

  • What were the culminating events of the Civil Rights Movement that led to the creation of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (which included the 14th Amendment--equal protection under the law, and the 15th Amendment--protection of voting rights for all citizens)? (¿Cuáles fueron los acontecimientos que culminaron el Movimiento de Derechos Civiles que llevaron a la creación de la Ley de Derechos Civiles de 1964 (que incluye la 14ª Enmienda, protección igual bajo la ley, y la 15ª Enmienda, protección de los derechos de voto para todos los ciudadanos)?

Possible Misconceptions:

  • Prejudice and racism ended when slavery ended.

  • The Civil Rights Movement was an unnecessary period of violence in our country’s past.

  • African American people would have eventually gotten the right to vote without all the protests and marches.

  • The “big idea” and “theme” are one and the same.

  • Students may struggle with the complexity of text in this unit. 

  • Teachers will need to continue to model using “think aloud” strategies, how they notice and track characters, infer, and make lists about possible themes.  Student talk will also allow students time to practice these skills. 

  • Teachers may assume that students are coming with the knowledge of how to identify theme in a text.  When students struggle to identify themes, then they cannot compare relationships across texts (compare and contrast). 

  • Teachers will need to root their conversations in text evidence to find trends and develop themes.



Culminating Tasks:

  • Mock interview with influential figures from Slavery and from Civil Rights Movement; will be delivered from historical figures’ perspectives.

  • Option: Wax Museum

  • Writing a Readers’ Theater Script and Readers’ Theater presentation. Focus areas: Slavery Era and/or Civil Rights Movement

What will mastery/success look like?

  • Students will be able to discuss the issues of slavery and ideas of the Civil Rights Movement, using specific details and relevant vocabulary.

  • Students will be able to describe how key historical figures contributed to the abolition of slavery and the Civil Rights Movement.

  • Students will be able to speak confidently and knowledgeably about events and figures from these historical periods.




Indicators of mastery/success? (criteria expectations with rubric…)

  • Students score proficient according to the LCPS 5th Grade writing rubrics.

  • Students effectively use Accountable Talk Stems to demonstrate their speaking and listening skills.

  • Students score proficient according to the editing checklist.

  • Students’ argumentative essay tasks meet the student learning outcomes for writing an argumentative essay.




Pre-Post Summative Assessment (See attached Pre-Post Assessment pdf in Resources)

1 Passage

1 Multiple Choice A/B Question on Vocab

2 Multiple Choice A/B Question on Evidence

3 Multiple Choice A/B Question on Structure

4 An OE Task





Interactive Read Aloud

Fiction (Trade Books, Novels/Chapter Books, Short Stories, Poetry) Novels may overlap instructional units in the quarter.

Non-Fiction (Informational text, Maps, Charts, Graphs, Biography, Speeches, Content Area Articles, Books, Magazines, etc.)

Alternate Text Suggestion: Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis. Note: The text listed in the weekly activity for Read Aloud is only in English. It is suggested that dual language teachers use the novel below because it is available in both English and Spanish.
(English) (Spanish)

Week 1

Text: (this text is English only)

The Watsons Go To Birmingham

By Christopher Paul Curtis




Instructional Focus:

Paying attention to characters: what they say, do, think.




Week 2

Text: (this text is English only)

The Watsons Go To Birmingham

By Christopher Paul Curtis




Instructional Focus:

Charting attributes of a theme: courage, friendship, perseverance.



Week 3

Text: (this text is English only)

The Watsons Go To Birmingham

By Christopher Paul Curtis




Instructional Focus:

Similarities and differences of characters, settings, and events.



Week 4

Text: (this text is English only)

The Watsons Go To Birmingham

By Christopher Paul Curtis




Instructional Focus:

How characters respond to events.




Interactive Read Aloud Structure (3-5)

Instructional Strategies

Think Aloud – Use Gradual Release Model & Accountable Talk Stems

1. Read text, stopping frequently to talk about how meaning is being made, analyzing the thinking process.

2. List the cues and strategies used.

3. Turn and Talk – Allow students to practice the strategy.

4. Share Out
Turn and Talk – Use Accountable Talk Stems

Have students turn and talk about the characters during close reading, interactive read aloud, and guided reading instruction. Use questions and prompts such as the ones below to help move your students’ understanding from character attributes to theme:



  • Can you tell me the reasons why the character said ...in the story? (¿Dime las razones porque el personaje dijo…en el cuento?)

  • How has your understanding of the character changed your thinking about the story? (¿Cómo a cambiado tu forma de pensar acerca del cuento al entender el personaje del cuento?)

  • What is the theme of this text? Can you give specific examples from the text to support your thinking? (¿Cuál es el tema de este texto? ¿Puedes dar ejemplos específicos del texto para apoyar tu razonamiento? )

  • Can you tell me how the character is feeling is this part of the story? Explain why the character is feeling this way. (¿Me puedes decir cómo se siente el personaje en esta parte del cuento? Explica por qué se siente el personaje así.)

  • How do these scenes/paragraphs/chapters go together? (¿Cómo se relacionan estos escenarios/párrafos/capítulos?)



Reading Response Journal

Use a three-column response to keep track of the evidence about your character and how your thinking is changing, questions that you have, and theories about theme. (Usa una tabla de tres columnas para escribir la evidencia sobre su personaje y como cambia tu pensamiento, preguntas que tuviste y/o teorías sobre el tema.)




Character Evidence (Evidencia del personaje)

My Thinking and Questions

(Mi pensamientos y preguntas)

Theories about themes (Teorías sobre el tema)

Character Evidence

My Thinking and Questions

Tracking what characters think, say, do…

How characters respond to events






Some themes that may emerge are: oppression, hope, discrimination, acceptance, perseverance, family, courage, etc.








Stop and Jot/Sketch
Reading Response Journal

After reading the initial chapter of a narrative piece or if the setting changes prompt students to stop and jot or sketch what they notice about the details in the setting. How does the setting help the reader understand the characters and theme in the text? (¿Cómo ayuda al lector la información sobre el ambiente entender los personajes y el tema del texto?)


Assessment-

Reading Response Journal

Timeline or Story Mountain

Participation in Discussion-Accountable Talk

Open Ended Responses



Close Reading Calendar 3-5

Week 1

Close Reading Lens: Evidence—What character thinks/feels (Evidencia – Qué piensa/siente el personaje)

Text: Henry’s Freedom Box (English) (“Manten la bandera en alto) – Este cuento esta en Calle de Lectura Unidad 2-Vol.1p. 208)

Instructional Focus: Developing theories about character (Desarrollando teorías sobre el personaje)

Introduce Text

Vocabulary Development

Close Reading

1. Read through a lens.

Close Reading

2.Look For Patterns

Close Reading

3.Developing a new understanding

Assessment

Narrative or Expository Writing Task

Identify Genre:

Text Structure:

Read Aloud and scaffold vocabulary.
Vocabulary:

Have students identify 3-5 words using the following criteria.

What words do you need to learn? What words are confusing? What clues in the book help you determine the meaning of those words? What is a synonym for the word? (¿Cuáles palabras necesitas aprender? ¿Cuáles palabras son difíciles de entender? ¿Cuáles claves en el libro te ayuda determinar el significado de estas palabras? ¿Qué es un sinónimo de la palabra?)



Reread the passage looking for _____________________ (lens).

Have students highlight text evidence.

Chart student responses in the first column of an anchor chart.


In small groups reread the passage and the evidence from yesterday.

Have students work in pairs and find which pieces of evidence fit together.


Chart the patterns you find in the second column of your anchor chart.

Ask students to reread the passage. Review anchor chart evidence and patterns. Turn and Talk about noticing’s.
Student Response – First I was thinking ______ now I am thinking _____ because….
(Al principio estaba pensando ________ pero ahora estoy pensando _______ porque …)
Journaling and Discussion Questions

How has your thinking changed about the character? How does the evidence of Henry’s thinking/feeling/doing help you form theories about themes in the text?


(¿Cómo ha cambiado tu pensamiento sobre el personaje? ¿Que evidencia del cuento te ayuda formar una teoría sobre el tema?)


Select a theme that you noticed in the passage. Using specific text evidence write a short essay that demonstrates how the evidence about the character supports the theme you selected?
Seleccione un tema que notaste en el texto. Utilizando evidencia específica del texto, escribe un ensayo corto que muestre ¿cómo la evidencia sobre el personaje apoya el tema que has seleccionado?

Week 2

Close Reading Lens--Expository: Evidence—Reading for a subject’s facts, phrases, descriptions

Text: Slavery, the Civil War & Reconstruction and The Underground Railroad (English text)

(Spanish text: La esclavitud, la Guerra Civil y Reconstrucción – El Tren Clandestino) – pdf online in Resource page

Instructional Focus: Central idea of an entire text

Introduce Text

Vocabulary Development

Close Reading

1. Read through a lens.

Close Reading

2.Look For Patterns

Close Reading

3.Developing a new understanding

Assessment

Narrative or Expository Writing Task

Identify Genre:

Text Structure:

Read Aloud and scaffold vocabulary.
Vocabulary:

Have students identify 3-5 words using the following criteria.

What words do you need to learn? What words are confusing?

What clues in the book help you determine the meaning of those words? What is a synonym for the word?

(¿Cuáles palabras necesitas aprender? ¿Cuáles palabras son difíciles de entender? ¿Cuáles claves en el libro te ayuda determinar el significado de estas palabras? ¿Cuál es un sinónimo de la palabra?)


Reread the passage looking for _____________________ (lens).

Have students highlight text evidence.

Chart student responses in the first column of an anchor chart.


In small groups reread the passage and the evidence from yesterday.

Have students work in pairs and find which pieces of evidence fit together.


Chart the patterns you find in the second column of your anchor chart.

Ask students to reread the passage. Review anchor chart evidence and patterns. Turn and Talk about noticing’s.
Student Response – First I was thinking ______ now I am thinking _____ because….
(Al principio estaba pensando ________ pero ahora estoy pensando _______ porque …)

What is the central idea of this text? Describe the central idea using specific details from the text to support your answer.
¿Cuál es la idea principal del texto? Describe la idea principal usando detalles específicos del texto para apoyar tu respuesta.

Week 3

Close Reading Lens: Narrative—Author’s point of view

Text: Freedom on the Menu (“Mahalia Jackson” por Julius Lester) – Este cuento esta en Calle de la Lectura Unidad 3 Vol.2 p. 430

Instructional Focus: Identifying an author’s claim/point of view; identifying text structure author uses to support the claim (Identificar el punto de vista del autor; identificar la estructura del texto que usa el autor para apoyar su reclamación)

Introduce Text

Vocabulary Development

Close Reading

1. Read through a lens.

Close Reading

2.Look For Patterns

Close Reading

3.Developing a new understanding

Assessment

Narrative or Expository Writing Task

Identify Genre:

Text Structure:

Read Aloud and scaffold vocabulary.
Vocabulary:

Have students identify 3-5 words using the following criteria.

What words do you need to learn? What words are confusing?

What clues in the book help you determine the meaning of those words? What is a synonym for the word?

(¿Cuáles palabras necesitas aprender? ¿Cuáles palabras son difíciles de entender? ¿Cuáles claves en el libro te ayuda determinar el significado de estas palabras? ¿Cuál es un sinónimo de la palabra?)


Reread the passage looking for _____________________ (lens).

Have students highlight text evidence.

Chart student responses in the first column of an anchor chart.


In small groups reread the passage and the evidence from yesterday.

Have students work in pairs and find which pieces of evidence fit together.


Chart the patterns you find in the second column of your anchor chart.

Ask students to reread the passage. Review anchor chart evidence and patterns. Turn and Talk about noticing’s.
Student Response – First I was thinking ______ now I am thinking _____ because….
(Al principio estaba pensando ________ pero ahora estoy pensando _______ porque …)


What point of view/claim does the author make in Freedom on the Menu? Use the evidence and your conclusions drawn during the reading this week to write an essay to support your thinking.
¿Qué punto de vista hace el autor en el cuento “Mahalia Jackson”? Utilizando la evidencia y tus conclusiones, escribe un ensayo para apoyar tus razonamiento.

Week 4

Close Reading Lens: Expository evidence—Reading for a subject’s facts, phrases, descriptions

Text: March on Washington Anniversary: Progress, But More Still Needed (Spanish text: Aniversario de la marcha en Washington: Progreso necesita más)-pdf online in Resource page

Instructional Focus: Central idea of an entire text

Introduce Text

Vocabulary Development

Close Reading

1. Read through a lens.

Close Reading

2.Look For Patterns

Close Reading

3.Developing a new understanding

Assessment

Narrative or Expository Writing Task

Identify Genre:

Text Structure:

Read Aloud and scaffold vocabulary.
Vocabulary:

Have students identify 3-5 words using the following criteria.

What words do you need to learn? What words are confusing?

What clues in the book help you determine the meaning of those words? What is a synonym for the word?

(¿Cuáles palabras necesitas aprender? ¿Cuáles palabras son difíciles de entender? ¿Cuáles claves en el libro te ayuda determinar el significado de estas palabras? ¿Cuál es un sinónimo de la palabra?)



Reread the passage looking for _____________________ (lens).

Have students highlight text evidence.

Chart student responses in the first column of an anchor chart.


In small groups reread the passage and the evidence from yesterday.

Have students work in pairs and find which pieces of evidence fit together.


Chart the patterns you find in the second column of your anchor chart.

Ask students to reread the passage. Review anchor chart evidence and patterns. Turn and Talk about noticing’s.
Student Response – First I was thinking ______ now I am thinking _____ because….
(Al principio estaba pensando ________ pero ahora estoy pensando _______ porque …)

Review the article Slavery, the Civil War & Reconstruction and The Underground Railroad and March on Washington Anniversary: Progress, But More Still Needed.

Each author presents the topic of people’s rights from a different perspective. Using specific details from both texts describe the most important ideas about people’s rights.


Repasa los artículos “La esclavitud, la Guerra Civil y Reconstrucción – El Tren Clandestino” y “Aniversario de la marcha en Washington: Progreso necesita más.” Cada autor presenta el tema de los derechos de las personas desde una perspectiva diferente. El uso de detalles específicos de ambos textos describen las ideas más importantes sobre los derechos de las personas.


Writing Calendar

Essential Question:

How do I organize an informational/explanatory writing piece that effectively demonstrates my understanding about a content area?


(¿Cómo puedo organizar una pieza de escritura informacional/explicativo que demuestra efectivamente mi comprensión sobre un área de contenido?)

Daily Writing Workshop (45-50 min)

Mini-Lesson 10 min

Guided Practice 5 min

Independent Writing 20-30 min

Share 5 min.


Assessment:

Have students progress through the stages of writing to produce an explanatory/informative text. Students will be assessed on the content as well as the structure of their writing.


Rubric:

Use the LCPS Informational/Explanatory Text-Based Rubric to score student writing.



#Fifth Grade Info Rubric.pdf

5thGrade_Q2_IntegratedUnit/%23Fifth Grade Info Rubric.pdf
Rubrics for Spanish writing - teachers can utilize rubrics from Calle de la Lectura in text titled: Desarrollo de guias de escritura y ejemplos de escritura (picture of text cover in resource page)



Genre:

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday


Week 1

Ask questions about Slavery and the Civil Rights Movement. Have students work with a partner to brainstorm ideas about what they want to write about. Then chart ideas and notes on chart paper. Generate some ideas for writing from the questions.

Share what they’ve written with a partner.



Teacher provides texts that are like what students will write (informative/

explanatory); students work in groups to read texts/passages and write noticings about the type of writing on sticky notes; teacher creates anchor chart of noticings about how the informative/

explanatory text is written.



Discuss noticing anchor chart.

Students begin writing around questions they want to answer about topic.


Then have them share what they’ve written with a partner.

Discuss with students that authors think about

how they organize their writing. Have students review some of the samples that you already shared with them. Have them identify what type of text structure the essay uses (sequential / chronological, problem / solution, cause & effect, etc.). Next, have students locate the focus statement or purpose.


Write draft around question, trying out structure.



Introduce the “Expository Writing: Idea Helper” and “Expository Writing Graphic Organizer” (see resource folder) to support student planning.
Have them discuss how they will use these planning organizers with a partner.

Week 2

Discuss purpose, focus statement / thesis and main idea. Give students examples. Craft some thesis statements as a whole class. Have students revisit their topics and decide on a purpose for their writing. Then have them write a focus statement or thesis. Have students share with a partner.

Students draft an introduction.



Teacher “checks in” on students as they draft.


Discuss ideas for body paragraph topics. Share examples with students. Draft a body paragraph together as a whole class. Discuss evidence that can be included to support the topic statements—statistics / data, expert opinions / quotes, anecdotes / stories. Have students select the topics for their three body paragraphs and share with a partner. Then have students write their first body paragraph after they write the topic sentence for the paragraph, and then share with a partner.

Continue to discuss additional ideas for the second body paragraph. Draft another body paragraph together as a whole class. Review the evidence that needs to be included. Have students write their second body paragraph after writing a topic sentence, and then share with a partner.

Continue to discuss additional ideas for the third body paragraph. Draft another body paragraph together as a whole class. Review the evidence that needs to be included. Have students write their third body paragraph after writing a topic sentence, and then share with a partner.

Review the criteria for the conclusion. Explain that a conclusion restates the main ideas and helps wrap up the essay. Have students draft their conclusions, and then share with a partner.


Week 3

Review key points that need to be included in expository essays. Share another essay example with students so that they can compare it to what they have drafted. Have students review what they have written and look for areas where they can elaborate on and further support their examples to build more detail into their essays. Have them check to make sure they have included data, expert opinions, quotes, and examples. Then have them share with a partner.

Review the importance of using academic vocabulary. Share examples of more rigorous vocabulary. In addition, discuss transition words with students. Have students review both the academic vocabulary and transition words in their essays and work to increase the rigor of vocabulary and use of effective transition words in their essay. Ask them to select several words to “upgrade,” using a thesaurus or dictionary if needed. Then have them share the changes with a partner.

Review the all the elements that need to be in an expository essay. Have students read and revise their first drafts. Then have students peer edit each other’s essays using a peer editing checklist (in resource folder).

Have students work on their final draft, editing using peer editing comments and checklist points.

Use the Information Writing Checklist to help students to assess their own writing or to have a partner assess their writing.



CL_INFO_G5.pdf


Have students continue to work on their final draft, editing using peer editing comments and checklist points.

Use the Information Writing Checklist to help students to assess their own writing or to have a partner assess their writing.



CL_INFO_G5.pdf



Week 4

Students should be editing for publishing and completing final draft.

Use the Information Writing Checklist to help students to assess their own writing or to have a partner assess their writing.



CL_INFO_G5.pdf

Students should be editing for publishing and completing final draft.

Share their writing with a partner and then with a small group.

Writers’ Celebration!

Have students do a reflection of the writing process.


Word Study

Use word sorts (Words Their Way Books or Teacher Created Sorts) to help students generalize learned spelling patterns. Once students have learned the spelling sorts and letter patterns, connect the skill to text by having students do a word hunt and collect words that follow the same pattern.


Words Their Way

Differentiated Instruction – Give students word sorts based on where they are on the Qualitative Spelling Inventory.

Small Group: Word Study Word Sorts:

  • Word Study Groups are based on Qualitative Spelling Inventory, Writing Samples, or Letter/Sound Assessments. Students are grouped according to their needs, not all students will be on the same sort. Use Word Sorts (Words Their Way books or teacher created sorts) to help students generalize learned spelling patterns. Once students have learned the sort and letter patterns, connect the skill to text by having students do a word hunt and collect words that follow the same pattern. They can find words in text or around the room and write them in their journals. (Teachers can create their own word sorts focusing on other spelling patterns.)




Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Introduce the word sort in small groups

Students sort their words, check with self, partner or teacher

Students do a Blind Sort or…

Students do a Speed Sort

Students do a Word Hunt in their guided reading book looking for words that contain the spelling feature.



Assessment:

Teacher gives students a writing sort with a few words from the sort and a few words that follow the pattern, but are not in the sort. Students can glue the sort into a journal


Assessment: Qualitative Spelling Inventory pdf (English)

(Spanish version is pdf in unit of study & resource section)
Word Study Activities

  • Independent Sort

  • Speed Sort- Race a buddy

  • Write your sort

  • Sort it another way

  • Word Hunt- Finding other words with that pattern.


Nifty 50 Words and Lessons : detailed instructions for teaching root words, prefixes and suffixes

http://read4me.weebly.com/uploads/7/0/8/7/7087098/mbm_phonics_for_4th_and_5th_grade_2007_ak.pdf

Nifty Thrifty Fifty Monthly Plan pdf

50 palabras ponderosas – pdf unit of study & resource section

Guided Reading /Book Clubs (45 - 60 min)
Objective: Students will focus on tracking strong characters actions, words, and thoughts: inferring theme; and building reading stamina, fluency, and metacognition skills.
Texts: Select personal narratives, folk tales, myths, and realistic fiction texts.

Guided Reading

Students participate in small group differentiated instruction. Text is determined based on student reading level and strategy needs.




Book Clubs/ Literature Circles

Small Group Conversation to See Students Tracing a Theme (3-5) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_2Rc5nCG5Q (YouTube- you may need to login)

(Only for students who are at or above grade level in reading) Students engage in differentiated novel studies in which students read independently, taking notes and tracking characters and themes in the book and then engage in “accountable book talk” and response to the book. Teachers monitor the comprehension work by conferring with readers and engage in small group strategy lessons.



Literacy Stations

  • Independent Reading

  • Writing About Reading

  • Word Sorts (Words Their Way)

  • Lexia

  • Nifty Thrifty Fifty Monthly Plan pdf

  • Independent Reading – 20 min / Conferencing with Readers

  • Book Clubs Meet and Discuss Books- 15 min

  • Word Work – 15 min


Resources:

Jan Richardson Guided Reading Lesson Plans



http://www.janrichardsonguidedreading.com/resources-1
Suggested Assessments:

Bi-Weekly Running Records

Reading Response Journal

Weekly Open–Ended Responses using text dependent inferential questions from students to assess comprehension.



DRA at the end of the 9 week period

Social Studies/Science

Time should be used to reinforce informational texts regarding Immigration and for research and work on the magazine task.
Research 20 min daily (or more if you have it)

Week 1-2 Researching for their Article Piece

Week 3 Focus on Interview

Week 4 Compare and Contrast Piece

The structure of the instructional time includes:


Role/Responsibilities of Teacher

Role/Responsibilities of Student

  • Facilitator

  • Gathering Resources

  • Conferring & Checking In

  • Small Group Instruction

  • Student Support with

    • Technology

    • Resources

    • Collaboration

    • Discussion

    • Presenting

  • Mini Lessons

    • Lesson on using accountable talk during collaboration

    • Lessons on asking and answering questions

    • Lessons on how to read to answer research questions or gather information

    • Lessons on how to organize information (boxes and bullets, chronology, description, cause and effect, compare and contrast, etc.)

    • Lessons on how to summarize information




  • Collaborating

  • Discussion

  • Accountable use of technology

  • Research-based on assigned topic or section of culminating activity

  • Presenting



Resources for Student Research:

http://www.timeforkids.com/around-the-world - This resource takes you to a page with a list of countries. Each country’s page lists basic facts along with interactive links (on left side) that include: sightseeing guide, history timeline, native lingo, challenge, and a day in the life.

http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/ - At this resource, students find information for their country that includes: fast facts, geography, nature, people and culture, government and economy, and history. Students type in the name of their country in the “search” bar to get them to their country’s profile.
Resources to support teacher learning for Project Based Learning (PBL)

http://bie.org/ - This site shows teachers how to use PBL in all grade levels and subject areas. It creates, gathers, and shares PBL instructional practices and products. Go to “Resources” to find many of the materials.

The Main Course, Not Dessert - article that explains how a PBL project is an essential tool for creating 21st Century students

8 Essentials For Project Based Learning – article that describes the 8 components that make up a quality PBL project


Resources to help support student learning for PBL (planning and reflection)

  • Team Agreement

  • Project Team Work Plan

  • Presentation Plan

  • Project Presentation Audience Feedback

  • My Thoughts


PBL Rubrics

  • Collaboration Rubric

  • Presentation Rubric







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