As Anglo-Saxon Hero Now that we have read much of the epic poem



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Beowulf as Anglo-Saxon Hero
Now that we have read much of the epic poem Beowulf and you have collected evidence of the title character’s heroic actions and abilities, you are ready to synthesize your understanding of Beowulf with your understanding of the Anglo-Saxon culture.
How does a hero change based on the values of the culture he or she is from?





6/Excellent

5/Competent

4/Adequate

3/Developing

2/Inconsistent

1/Weak

Introduction

  • The writerstates a complex thesis and offers a critical context for discussion that presents the question at issue (how Beowulf reflects Anglo-Saxon values) and presents the discussion through a critical lens (e.g, contemporary heroism).

  • The writer defines the conceptof heroism as part of the context for discussion.

  • The writerstates a complex thesis and presents the question (how Beowulf reflects Anglo-Saxon values) through an historic lens.

  • The writer defines the concept of heroism as part of the context for discussion.

  • The writerstates a clear thesis, explaining her position clearly. The writer offers a specific context for discussion, referencing the question-at-issue presented by the prompt (Beowulf’s heroism).

  • The writer may fail to relate Beowulf’s traits to Anglo-Saxon values.

  • Writer takes a position but does not offer a context for discussion; OR the writer restates the prompt verbatim.

The writer fails to take a clear position on the issue.

Development of Ideas


  • The writer supports all complex claims with multiple relevant quotes or paraphrases per paragraph. The writer introduces all evidence with signal phrases that go beyond formulaic.

  • The writer thoroughly interprets the evidence, consistently analyzing diction and insightful discussion of the significance of evidence (i.e, why it matters), relating the discussion to Anglo-Saxon cultural values.

  • The writer supports complex claims with multiple relevant quotes or paraphrasing in each paragraph. The writer introduces all evidence with specific contexts.

  • Interpretation of evidence includes some diction analysis explaining the implications of words and phrases and why evidence matters, often relating the discussion to Anglo-Saxon cultural values.

  • The writer supportssimple claimswith relevant quotes or paraphrasing. The writer introduces most quotes with a context and signal phrase.

  • Interpretation of evidence is not yet deep: the writer may not fully analyze the implications of words or phrases nor fully discuss the significance of ideas (how a trait reflects a cultural value and why).

  • Some claims may be unclear. The writer supports at least one claim with relevant evidence but may attempt to support other claims with irrelevant or unclear evidence. Quotes may be without context but have some signal phrases.

  • Elaboration of evidence may be confined to repetition of the quote. The writer’s logic may be flawed or unclear.

  • The writer fails to support any claims with relevant evidence although the writer may have attempted to include some quotes. The writer fails to introduce evidence with signal phrases.

  • Elaboration on evidence, if present, is incomplete, unclear, or irrelevant.

OR

The writer makes little attempt to analyze the evidence.



Claims are poorly supported. The essay may include excessive repetition of the writer's ideas or of ideas in the prompt.

Sentence Structure


  • The writer uses a variety of sentence structures (e.g., compound and complex sentences, participial phrases, appositives) without errors.

  • The writer has some sentence variety (e.g., compound, complex sentences, relative clauses) with very few errors.

  • The writer avoids errors in sentence structure, but sentences are simple.

  • The writer experiments with some sentence variety (e.g., compound and complex sentences, relative clauses), but run-ons or fragments are particularly noticeable.

  • The writer leaves too many errors in sentence structure (e.g., run-on sentences, comma splices, fragments) which sometimes make the essay difficult to follow.

  • Errors in sentence structure make the essay difficult to understand.

MLA Format





  • The writer follows MLA formatting throughout the essay: in the heading, page numbers, in-text citations, and in the Works Cited.

  • The writer follows MLA formatting through most of the essay, in the heading, in-text citations, or in the Works Cited.




The writer shows no awareness of MLA format in the essay.


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