Argument Essay Worthy Hero? Now



Download 39,21 Kb.
Date conversion14.02.2017
Size39,21 Kb.

Argument Essay

  • Worthy Hero?

Now

  • Hamburger/Hamburger paper.

Now

  • Get into your groups.
  • Choose two post-it notes that show your character is admirable.
  • Choose one post-it note showing your character is NOT admirable.

Hamburger Hamburger Paper

  • ADMIRABLE QUOTE
  • ADMIRABLE QUOTE
  • NOT ADMIRABLE
  • Revi
  • Quote 1 (pg. #)
  • Quote 2 (pg. #)
  • Quote 3 (pg. #)

Hamburger Hamburger Paper

  • ADMIRABLE QUOTE
  • ADMIRABLE QUOTE
  • NOT ADMIRABLE
  • Revi
  • Thesis: In the (TEXT) epic poem (TITLE) The Odyssey, by (AUTHOR) Homer, Odysseus is an unworthy hero because of his arrogant actions and motives. .
  • Quote 1 (pg. #)
  • Quote 2 (pg. #)
  • Quote 3 (pg. #)

Write on center diamond:

  • Driving Question for Thesis: In the epic poem, The Odyssey by Homer, Odysseus is an unworthy hero because of his arrogant actions and motives.
  • USE YOUR “KEY WORDS FOR The Odyssey” IN YOUR THESIS.
  • Answer with FATT.
  • Example: In the (TEXT) epic poem (TITLE) The Odyssey, by (AUTHOR) Homer, Odysseus is an unworthy hero because of his arrogant actions and motives.

Hamburger/Hamburger

  • Say-Mean-Matter Quotes 1 and 2.
  • Leave Quote 3 (quote that goes against your thesis) alone.

Hamburger Hotdog Paper

  • Writer’s Name: Tommy Kim
  • Quote #1
  • Say: “‘O Cyclops! Would you feast on my companions? Puny, am I, in a cave man’s hands? How do you like the beating that we gave you, you damned cannibal? Eater of guests under your roof! Zeus and the gods have paid you!’” (994).
  • MEAN: Odysseus illustrates colossal hubris in what amounts to a glory-taunt, insulting the Cyclops even after debilitating the creature by stabbing his eye. MATTER: In this case, Odysseus acts with the immaturity of a child, acting in an unworthy way of taking advantage of an opponent when they are most vulnerable. Had Odysseus made these claims of strength and bravado while he were in the cave, staring at the face of death, then he would be worthy, but making these taunts after escaping amounts to a cowardly act. In fact, he endangers his men by this juvenile behavior since the Cyclops then throws a boulder at the men, prompted by this taunt. Lives are endangered, immaturity is revealed, and Odysseus is unworthy.
  • Quote #2
  • SAY:
  • MEAN:
  • MATTER:
  • Quote #3 (Counterargument)
  • SAY: “I clambered fore and aft my hulk until a comber/split her, keel from ribs, and the big timber/floated free; the mast, too, broke away…These I straddled,/riding the frightful storm” (1015).
  • Thesis: In the (TEXT) epic poem (TITLE) The Odyssey, by (AUTHOR) Homer, Odysseus is an unworthy hero because of his arrogant actions and motives. .

The Counterargument

  • “I know you are, but what am I?”

Evidence: The Counterargument

  • What do you know about a “counterargument?”
  • It’s difficult
  • Evidence goes AGAINST your thesis
  • Opposite of what the person is arguing
  • Use facts
  • Something that proves a point wrong
  • Rebuttal

Evidence: The Counterargument

  • Your parents tell you, “your curfew is set for 10pm. The Van Nuys police website shows that crime is mostly committed between the times of 10pm-2am.”
  • Talk to a partner and explain how you can give a counterargument.
  • 1 minute.

Evidence: The Counterargument

  • Your parents tell you, “you cannot go to Alejandro’s party. He was arrested in middle school for bringing matches and dirty underwear to school.”
  • Talk to a partner and explain how you can give a counterargument.
  • 1 Minute

Evidence: The Counterargument

  • Your parents tell you, “downtown Los Angeles is too far. You can’t go there without an adult.”
  • Talk to a partner and explain how you can give a counterargument.
  • 1 Minute

Evidence: The Counterargument

  • Thesis
  • Contradicting Evidence
  • Counter-argument on how evidence
  • Is NOT valid.

Evidence: The Counterargument

  • Thesis
  • Contradicting Evidence
  • Use THE UNTOLD to show how contradicting evidence still proves thesis.

Evidence: The Counterargument

  • Thesis: Pitbulls are one of the friendliest breeds and the ban in Denver should be overturned.
  • Contradicting Evidence: Pitbulls have the highest rate of attacks on humans.
  • The untold: THE OWNERS!

Evidence: The Counterargument

  • Thesis: Pitbulls are one of the friendliest breeds and the ban in Denver should be overturned.
  • Contradicting Evidence: Pitbulls have the highest rate of attacks on humans.
  • Counter-argument on how evidence is NOT valid:
  • This breed of dog attracts owners who are criminals who raise the dogs to fight, training them to have violent tendencies. Like children, mean and violent owners will translate to mean and violent dogs, and most other breeds have owners who want to raise their dogs properly. It’s not the dog breed that is violent but the type of owner who raise them.

Evidence: The Counterargument

  • Thesis: All types of guns should be legal.
  • Contradicting Evidence: The Sandy Hook shootings left dozens of children dead.
  • Counter-argument on how evidence is NOT valid:
  • Work with a partner and come up with why this contradicting evidence can be WRONG. I will give you 3 minutes.

Evidence: The Counterargument

  • Thesis: All types of guns should be legal.
  • Contradicting Evidence: The Sandy Hook shootings left dozens of children dead.
  • Counter-argument on how evidence is NOT valid:
  • THE UNTOLD: Mental Illness!

Evidence: The Counterargument

  • Thesis: We should encourage the use of capital punishment in all states.
  • Contradicting Evidence: Texas has the most executions out of all states, but the murder rate is also the highest.
  • Counter-argument on how evidence is NOT valid:
  • Work with a partner and come up with why this contradicting evidence can be WRONG (hint, use 3rd variable, low income, low graduation rates, etc. of TX). I will give you 3 minutes.

Evidence: The Counterargument

  • Thesis: We should encourage the use of capital punishment in all states.
  • Contradicting Evidence: Texas has the most executions out of all states, but the murder rate is also the highest.
  • THE UNTOLD: Income (low)

Evidence: The Counterargument

  • Thesis: College athletes should get paid for playing.
  • Contradicting Evidence: In Slovania, where college players get paid, they have the highest dropout rate in the world.
  • Counter-argument on how evidence is NOT valid:
  • Unmentioned variable: Slovania’s average income is lowest in the European Union.

Evidence: The Counterargument

  • Thesis: We should encourage the use of capital punishment in all states.
  • Contradicting Evidence: Texas has the most executions out of all states, but the murder rate is also the highest.
  • Counter-argument on how evidence is NOT valid:
  • Work with a partner and come up with why this contradicting evidence can be WRONG (hint, use low income, low graduation rates, etc. of TX). I will give you 3 minutes.

Evidence: The Counterargument

  • Thesis: The Lakers are the best team in basketball this season.
  • Contradicting Evidence: The Lakers have the worst record in the league.
  • Counter-argument using THE UNTOLD on how evidence is NOT valid:
  • Work with a partner and come up with why this contradicting evidence can be WRONG. I will give you 3 minutes.

Evidence: The Counterargument

  • Thesis: Birmingham Students are the most kind students in all of the valley.
  • Contradicting Evidence: Birmingham has the highest rate of fights.
  • Counter-argument on how evidence is NOT valid:
  • Work with a partner and come up with why this contradicting evidence can be WRONG. I will give you 3 minutes.

COUNTER-ARGUMENT

  • THESIS: In the epic poem, The Odyssey by Homer, Odysseus is an unworthy hero because of his arrogant actions and motives.
  • Say: “I clambered fore and aft my hulk until a comber/split her, keel from ribs, and the big timber/floated free; the mast, too, broke away…These I straddled,/riding the frightful storm” (1015).
  • Mean (What does the quote “mean”? Summarize):
  • Odysseus explains how he tied the broken pieces of his boat together to survive the ocean storm.
  • MATTER (How does this matter to the thesis?):
  • Although he shows muscular strength by tying rope to broken pieces of wood, in the end, he lacks the courageous motive and mental strength to risk his life and find his men. The put it another way, he is unworthy because he is arrogantly looking out for himself instead of searching for survivors (THE UNTOLD) for whom he is responsible as a leader.

USE STUDENT THESIS AND SAY-MEAN-MATTER

  • THESIS:
  • Say:
  • Mean (Who, What, Where):
  • MATTER (How does this matter to the thesis?):

Hamburger Hotdog Paper

  • Writer’s Name: Tommy Kim
  • Quote #1
  • Say: ABIGAIL. I have been hurt, Mr. Danforth; I have seen my blood runnin’ out! I have been near to murdered every day because I done my duty pointing out the Devil’s people—and this is my reward? To be mistrusted, denied, questioned like a—
  • DANFORTH, weakening. Child, I do not mistrust you
  • ABIGAIL, looking about in the air, clasping her arms about her as though cold. I—I know not. A wind, a cold wind, has come. (101)
  • MEAN: Abigail argues that she is the virtuous one, that she is suffering because she is aiding the court, turning in those who were acting suspicious
  • MATTER: In this case, her denouncement of the court reveals her admirable ambition to beat the unfair judicial system, and by simply pointing at the paranoia in the air, not creating it, she confirms what the judges already believe—that evil has invaded the town and is clouding their judgment.
  • Quote #2
  • Say:ABIGAIL. She is blackening my name in the village! She is telling lies about me! She is a cold, sniveling woman, and you bend to her! Let her turn you like a—PROCTOR. Do you look for whippin’? (22)
  • MEAN: This passage illustrates just how far Williams uses any means necessary to win Proctor’s love, even questioning his manhood.
  • MATTER: As a result, her ambition inspires her to try new methods to be romantically involved with Proctor, never quitting, using her resourcefulness to use every possible way to achieve her goal of Proctor.
  • Quote #3 (Counterargument)
  • Say: ABIGAIL. No, he’ll be comin’ up. Listen, now; if they be questioning us,
  • tell them we danced—I told him as much already. (18)
  • MEAN: This passage reveals how Williams can masterfully arrange plans so that all the girls involved with the original ritual have the same account of the incident.
  • MATTER: Ultimately, Abigail Williams ambitiously arranges the proper stories to tell using her resourceful mind. Though this may be immoral to some who are obsessive with rules, in the end Williams allows her friends and herself a way to escape the cruel punishments given out during that time, punishment that included stone presses, hangings, and drowning. The pure ambition to survive allowed Williams to survive the ruthless persecution of that era.
  • In the play The Crucible, by Arthur Miller, Abigail Williams is an admirable character whose resourcefulness and ambition are heroic.

Introductions

  • You are making a first impression. What do you do when first meeting someone you want to like you? Charm? Humor? Sincerity?
  • Writing is a social act.

Introduction

  • Anecdotal using Scene
  • Interesting Factual statement
  • COLLECT NOTES on these moves.

Introductions

  • Interesting Statement of Fact
    • Start introduction with a compelling fact.
    • Tone of introduction is factual, objective, and scientific.
    • Writer is telling reader, “I’m not messing with feelings. It’s all facts, baby.”
    • Good for writing that is heavily leaning on logic
      • Research papers
      • Science writing

Introductions

  • Take out a piece of paper.
  • Write “interesting fact” on this paper.

Introductions

  • Interesting Statement of Fact
  • Look up a famous person that has the admirable traits of your character:
  • In 1967 John McCain, a United States senator, was shot down by the North Vietnamese while flying a mission.
  • Edith Cavell, a nurse in Belgium during World War One, was arrested and executed for helping allied servicemen escape back to England.
  • .

Introductions

  • Look up a famous person who has the admirable traits of your character:
  • Donald Trump is worth four billion dollars, and he is running for the United States Presidency for 2016
  • In the epic poem, The Odyssey by Homer, Odysseus is an unworthy hero because of his arrogant actions and motives.
  • .

Example:

    • Example:
    • Donald Trump is worth four billion dollars, and he is running
    • for the United States Presidency for 2016. Many business
    • leaders respect and admire Trump’s accomplishments, but
    • many of his actions, including dodging the Vietnam War
    • draft, reveal an unworthy man who persuades Americans by
    • using hatred and fear to diminish those who are
    • disadvantaged. He is an arrogant bully. (Move #1) Many
    • men like Trump fail living up to the standards of
    • heroism, going back centuries, including characters in
    • literature from Hellenistic Troy. (Move #2) In the epic
    • poem, The Odyssey by Homer, Odysseus is an
    • unworthy hero because of his arrogant actions and
    • motives.

Introduction

  • Scene
    • Use 3 out of the 5 senses
    • Quickest way to emotionally convince the reader
    • Pure storytelling
    • Mr. Kim is nuts about this one. But you should learn other techniques.
  • Who, what, where of argument.
    • Who: People, beings, living creatures
    • What: Transience
    • Where: Living rooms, kitchens, schools, anywhere!

Introduction

  • Take out a piece of paper.
  • Label it “Scene Introduction.”

Introduction

  • Turn in “Scene Introduction” in the back tray.

Introduction

  • Scene: Write 3 sensory details about a time you experienced the thesis:
    • EXAMPLE: MR. KIM’s FATHER IN COMMUNITY COLLEGE.
    • 3 SENSORY DETAILS
    • Air conditioning
    • Back Pack zipping
    • Whispering of students

Introduction

  • Scene: Write 3 sensory details.
  • The air conditioning of the classroom (WHERE) came down heavily on my father’s (WHO) head, chilling the sweat off of his neck. The community college classroom was filled to capacity, with 80 students rustling papers, zipping up back packs, and whispering to each other before the professor arrived. My father smelled the strange perfumes that reminded him of fruit and flowers. When the professor began the lecture, my father was utterly bewildered. He could catch a few words, but the Chemistry class seemed fractured, unable to be pieced together. Although he had a minimal understanding of English, my father charged ahead to take this class to provide a better life for his family. The impossibility (WHAT) stared him in the face, but he attempted the class anyways. He ultimately dropped out of the class, but it doesn’t mean he is less admirable. (TRANSITION TO THESIS)It is the reaching that matters more than the attaining.
  • Who, what, where of argument.
    • Who: My father
    • What: impossibility
    • Where: Classroom

Introduction

  • Scene: Write 3 sensory details.
  • Use a student sample “admirable” character

Introduction

  • Write your thesis after each of your introductions: Scene, Rhetorical Question, Factual Statement.
    • Example:
  • The black smoke from the burning Blackhawk helicopter smothered my uncle’s face. He and his partner, Delta Force Sergeant Shugart, watched as mobs of Somali soldiers approached the crashed helicopter. Even amid the thumping helicopter blades, my uncle could hear the shots and cheers of the mob. But my uncle asked to be lowered closer to the crash. My uncle, Delta Force sniper team leader Gary Gordon, slid down a nylon rope from the helicopter, landed on the dirt, and ran to the injured pilot tangled in the crash. My uncle knew his chances of survival were close to zero. The impossibility stared him in the face, but he attempted to secure the perimeter anyways. He ultimately was killed, but it doesn’t mean he is less admirable. It is the reaching that matters more than the attaining. In the play The Crucible, by Arthur Miller, John Proctor is one such hero, an admirable character whose reaching for the impossible is considered heroic.

In groups of 3:

  • In groups of 3:
  • Receive two pieces of paper from Mr. Kim
  • Hamburger Hot Dog your papers.
  • Read each person’s introductions.
  • Critique the following items for each introduction:
      • Transition from introduction to thesis
      • Presence of: WHO-WHAT-WHERE
  • 5. Vote for each partner’s best introduction on center diamond.
    • For full credit, you must turn in all reviews attached to all 3 introductions.

The Odyssey Argumentative Essay

  • Take out:
  • Hamburger/Hamburger paper
  • Say-Mean-Matter Power verbs/phrases worksheet
  • (Extra Fun! Vocabulary: Doltish, Asinine, Moronic, Vapid)

Introduction

  • Take out your introduction (Statement of fact and scene)
  • Take out your say-mean-matter hamburger/hotdog paper

Introduction

  • Take out your introduction
  • Take out your thesis
  • Take out your say-mean-matter hamburger/hotdog paper
  • Take out your 18 moves list

Introduction

  • Writing can be reduced to a series of moves. Let’s see what kind of moves Mr. Kim has!

Transience Essay Moves

  • Take out the essay “A Toddler With a Nuclear Weapon” by Lucius Cincinnatus.
  • Work with a partner
  • You will highlight each move
  • I will call on you
  • Read the first three words of the sentence for each move.

Essay Moves: The Crucible

  • Transition into thesis
  • Thesis Paragraph #1
  • Introduction to quote
  • Say #1
  • Mean#1
  • Matter#1 Paragraph #2
  • Transition from matter #1 to next paragraph
  • Introduction to quote (Moves 7 & 8 could be the same sentence)
  • Say #2
  • Mean#2
  • Matter#2 Paragraph #3
  • Transition from matter #2 to next paragraph
  • Introduce counterargument quote (Moves 12 & 13 could be the same sentence)
  • Say #3 (Counterargument)
  • Mean#3
  • Matter#3 (Introduce THE UNTOLD) Paragraph #4
  • Transition into last paragraph
  • Restatement of thesis
  • Connect thesis to original fact, scene, opinion or the rest of the world Paragraph #5

Underline and number each move:

  • Transition to thesis

Underline and number each move:

  • Transition to thesis
  • Thesis

Underline and number each move:

  • Transition to thesis
  • Thesis
  • Introduction to quote #1

Underline and number each move:

  • Transition to thesis
  • Thesis
  • Introduction to quote
  • Say #1

Underline and number each move:

  • Transition to thesis
  • Thesis
  • Introduction to quote
  • Say #1
  • Mean#1

Underline and number each move:

  • Transition to thesis
  • Thesis
  • Introduction to quote
  • Say #1
  • Mean#1
  • Matter#1

Underline and number each move:

  • Transition to thesis
  • Thesis
  • Introduction to quote
  • Say #1
  • Mean#1
  • Matter#1
  • Transition from matter #1 to next paragraph

Underline and number each move:

  • Transition to thesis
  • Thesis
  • Introduction to quote
  • Say #1
  • Mean#1
  • Matter#1
  • Transition from matter #1 to next paragraph
  • Introduction to quote (Moves 7 & 8 could be the same sentence)

Underline and number each move:

  • Transition to thesis
  • Thesis
  • Introduction to quote
  • Say #1
  • Mean#1
  • Matter#1
  • Transition from matter #1 to next paragraph
  • Introduction to quote (Moves 6 & 7 could be the same sentence)
  • Say #2

Underline and number each move:

  • Transition to thesis
  • Thesis
  • Introduction to quote
  • Say #1
  • Mean#1
  • Matter#1
  • Transition from matter #1 to next paragraph
  • Introduction to quote (Moves 7 & 8 could be the same sentence)
  • Say #2
  • Mean#2

Underline and number each move:

  • Transition to thesis
  • Thesis
  • Introduction to quote
  • Say #1
  • Mean#1
  • Matter#1
  • Transition from matter #1 to next paragraph
  • Introduction to quote (Moves 7 & 8 could be the same sentence)
  • Say #2
  • Mean#2
  • Matter#2

Underline and number each move:

  • Transition to thesis
  • Thesis
  • Introduction to quote
  • Say #1
  • Mean#1
  • Matter#1
  • Transition from matter #1 to next paragraph
  • Introduction to quote (Moves 7 & 8 could be the same sentence)
  • Say #2
  • Mean#2
  • Matter#2
  • Transition from matter #2 to next paragraph

Underline and number each move:

  • Transition to thesis
  • Thesis
  • Introduction to quote
  • Say #1
  • Mean#1
  • Matter#1
  • Transition from matter #1 to next paragraph
  • Introduction to quote (Moves 7 & 8 could be the same sentence)
  • Say #2
  • Mean#2
  • Matter#2
  • Transition from matter #2 to next paragraph
  • Introduce counterargument quote

Underline and number each move:

  • Transition to thesis
  • Thesis
  • Introduction to quote
  • Say #1
  • Mean#1
  • Matter#1
  • Transition from matter #1 to next paragraph
  • Introduction to quote (Moves 7 & 8 could be the same sentence)
  • Say #2
  • Mean#2
  • Matter#2
  • Transition from matter #2 to next paragraph
  • Introduce counterargument quote
  • Say #3 (Counterargument)

Underline and number each move:

  • Transition to thesis
  • Thesis
  • Introduction to quote
  • Say #1
  • Mean#1
  • Matter#1
  • Transition from matter #1 to next paragraph
  • Introduction to quote (Moves 7 & 8 could be the same sentence)
  • Say #2
  • Mean#2
  • Matter#2
  • Transition from matter #2 to next paragraph
  • Introduce counterargument quote
  • Say #3 (Counterargument)
  • Mean#3

Underline and number each move:

  • Transition to thesis
  • Thesis
  • Introduction to quote
  • Say #1
  • Mean#1
  • Matter#1
  • Transition from matter #1 to next paragraph
  • Introduction to quote (Moves 7 & 8 could be the same sentence)
  • Say #2
  • Mean#2
  • Matter#2
  • Transition from matter #2 to next paragraph
  • Introduce counterargument quote
  • Say #3 (Counterargument)
  • Mean#3
  • Matter#3

Underline and number each move:

  • Thesis
  • Transition to thesis
  • Introduction to quote
  • Say #1
  • Mean#1
  • Matter#1
  • Transition from matter #1 to next paragraph
  • Introduction to quote (Moves 7 & 8 could be the same sentence)
  • Say #2
  • Mean#2
  • Matter#2
  • Transition from matter #2 to next paragraph
  • Introduce counterargument quote
  • Say #3 (Counterargument)
  • Mean#3
  • Matter#3
  • Transition into last paragraph

Underline and number each move:

  • Transition to thesis
  • Thesis
  • Introduction to quote
  • Say #1
  • Mean#1
  • Matter#1
  • Transition from matter #1 to next paragraph
  • Introduction to quote (Moves 7 & 8 could be the same sentence)
  • Say #2
  • Mean#2
  • Matter#2
  • Transition from matter #2 to next paragraph
  • Introduce counterargument quote
  • Say #3 (Counterargument)
  • Mean#3
  • Matter#3
  • Transition into last paragraph
  • Restatement of thesis

Move #1

  • Write your thesis after your transition into your thesis.
    • Example:
    • Donald Trump is worth four billion dollars, and he is running
    • for the United States Presidency for 2016. Many business
    • leaders respect and admire Trump’s accomplishments, but
    • many of his actions, including dodging the Vietnam War
    • draft, reveal an unworthy man who persuades Americans by
    • using hatred and fear to diminish those who are
    • disadvantaged. He is an arrogant bully. (Move #1) Many
    • men like Trump fail living up to the standards of
    • heroism, going back centuries, including characters in
    • literature from Hellenistic Troy. (Move #2) In the epic
    • poem, The Odyssey by Homer, Odysseus is an
    • unworthy hero because of his arrogant actions and
    • motives.

MOVE #3, PARAGRAPH #2!

    • Introduce quote “move. Summarize what is happening around the quote. Assume the reader hasn’t read the book.)
  • Use the following template:
    • A clear instance Odysseus’s unworthy ways was (who-what-when of scene), “Quote” (Page #)
    • Example: A clear instance Odysseus’s unworthy ways was after the encounter with the Cyclops, when Odysseus and his men escaped the cave of the single-eyed cannibal,

Move #4 - 6

  • (Move # 4) “‘O Cyclops! Would you feast on my companions? Puny, am I, in a cave man’s hands? How do you like the beating that we gave you, you damned cannibal? Eater of guests under your roof! Zeus and the gods have paid you!’” (994). (Move # 5) Odysseus illustrates colossal hubris in what amounts to a glory-taunt, insulting the Cyclops even after debilitating the creature by stabbing his eye. (Move # 6) In this case, Odysseus acts with the immaturity of a child, acting in an unworthy way of taking advantage of an opponent when they are most vulnerable. Had Odysseus made these claims of strength and bravado while he were in the cave, staring at the face of death, then he would be worthy, but making these taunts after escaping amounts to a cowardly act. In fact, he endangers his men by this juvenile behavior since the Cyclops then throws a boulder at the men, prompted by this taunt. Lives are endangered, immaturity is revealed, and Odysseus is unworthy.

Move #7 & 8

  • Transition “move” into paragraph #3
  • Use the following template:
  • (Move #7) Not only is his (worthy/unworthy trait) displayed when (Where say #1 occurs) his worthy/unworthy attitude is also on display when (Where say #2 occurs). (Move #8)
  • Example: Not only is his immaturity on display when fighting an enemy, his unworthy attitude is also on display when he interacts with his men, specifically during their stay on the island filled with the Cattle of the Sun God

Paragraph #3: Moves 9-11

  • Move 9 (Say): “’O Father Zeus and gods in bliss forever, you made me sleep away this day of mischief” (1012)!
  • Move 10 (Mean): Odysseus claims that it was Zeus’ fault for Odysseus oversleeping while his men slaughtered the cows, which were supposed to be left alone.
  • Move 11 (Matter): As a result of Odysseus’ absence from the men, they had offended the Sun Gods by killing the cows, but Odysseus is avoiding his responsibility by blaming Zeus. He is an unworthy leader who arrogantly believes he is not capable of doing wrong, revealing a selfish motive that refuses to accept the consequences for making a mistake.

Paragraph #4: Moves 12-16

  • Move 12 (Contrast Transition): There are some circumstances, however, that readers might deem Odysseus as (worthy/unworthy), such as the moment when Odysseus (Who-what-where of quote), Move 13 (Introduce quote):

Paragraph #4: Moves 12-16

  • Move 14 (Say: a quote that CONTRADICTS your thesis)
  • “I clambered fore and aft my hulk until a comber/split her, keel from ribs, and the big timber/floated free; the mast, too, broke away…These I straddled,/riding the frightful storm” (1015).
  • Move 15 (Mean): Odysseus explains how he tied the broken pieces of his boat together to survive the ocean storm.
  • Move 16 (Matter):Although he shows muscular strength by tying rope to broken pieces of wood, in the end, he lacks the courageous motive and mental strength to risk his life and find his men. The put it another way, he is unworthy because he is arrogantly looking out for himself instead of searching for survivors . (Unmentioned Variable) for whom he is responsible as a leader.

Paragraph #5: Moves 16-18

  • 1
  • (Move 17: Transition) On the whole, being a leader is difficult because a good leader always puts the women and men they are responsible for first. As the president of the United States, your primary responsibility is to protect those who need help, and like Odysseus, (Move 18: Connect with introduction) Trump only understands his selfish motives—they both only understand colossal hubris and arrogance. We can only hope that being a hero does not mean being someone with the motives of a toddler. A toddler with his fingertip over a nuclear weapon switch can only mean catastrophe for all of us.

Essay Rubric

  • Attach the following:
    • Rough draft of essay (printed)
    • Three introductions
    • Two peer edits of introductions
    • Say-mean-matter: Hamburger/Hamburger outline
  • Typed draft is due Friday: 11/14.

Essay Rubric

  • If you are finished, turn in the following, stapled:
    • Your Essay
    • The rubric, graded by your partner (attach the paper your partner WROTE on)

Finish!

  • Turn in your rough draft in the back tray.
  • If you are not done, finish the essay this weekend or come into tutoring during lunch. Or schedule a time to meet. DEMAND a time to meet. Own your life.


The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2016
send message

    Main page