Aml 1000: American Literature Instructor: Professor Barletta Educational Background



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AML 1000: American Literature

Instructor: Professor Barletta

Educational Background: Doctoral Candidate for Ed.D in Higher Education Instructional Leadership- Nova Southeastern University

Master of Arts with a Major in English-Florida Atlantic University

Bachelor of Arts with a Major in English-Florida Atlantic University

E-mail: cbarletta@keiseruniversity.edu

E-companion: http://www.keiseruniversity.org

Class website: http://aml1000.weebly.com/

Class Meeting Times: Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday 9:00am-1:00 pm

Office Hours: M, T, TH 7:30am-8:45am; 2:00pm-5:00pm; W 9:00am-2:00pm and by appointment (Main Building, 2nd floor)

Prerequisites: None

Credit Hours: 3.0 semester credit hours

Contact Hours: 48

Lecture Hours: 48

Textbook Title: The Norton Anthology of American Literature, shorter 8th edition

Publisher’s Name: W.W. Norton

Text Author’s Name: Nina Baym, ed

Text ISBN: 978-0-393-91885-4

Instructor’s Qualifications: Earned doctorate or master’s degree in English or master’s degree with 18 graduate credit hours in subject taught.

Gordon Rule: This is a Gordon Rule course requiring a minimum of 4,000 written words. Students enrolled in AA, BA or BS programs must earn a grade of “C” (70%) or higher to receive credit.

Course Description: Explores select American authors and literary texts. Topics include historical background, social forces, literary genres and elements.

Course Topics:


  • Why study literature

  • Elements of literature

  • Literary genres

  • Survey of American authors

  • American literary movements and periods




Course Objectives: At the completion of the course, students are able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of American authors and works through the twentieth century.

  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the major literary periods and genres in American literature within social and historical contexts.

  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the elements of poetry, drama, and fiction.

Evidence interpretive and critical thinking skills through literary analyses.


Course Evaluation Strategies (Methodologies)

Student performance is evaluated as follows:




20 %

  • Midterm

30 %

  • Assignments (quizzes, tests, writing assignments, discussions, and presentations)

25%

  • 5 page Literary Research Paper

20 %

  • Final Examination/Project

5 %

  • Post-test

100 %

  • Total possible score


Grading Scale
A final grade is determined using the following grading scale


90-100%

  • A

80-89.99%

  • B

70-79.99%

  • C

65-69.99%

  • D

Below 65%

  • F

Methods of Course Delivery: The subject matter in this course is presented in various forms which may include lectures, class discussions, demonstrations, collaborative activities, computer assignments, student projects and presentations, on-line research, guest speakers, or field trips.

Schedule of Assignments



WEEK 1

Learning Objective(s): 1, 2, 3, 4

M: Introduction: Diagnostic and Pre-Test

In-class readings and discussions:




  • American Literature, Beginnings to 1700 (pp. 3-19)

  • “The Iroquois Creation Story” (pp. 20-23)

  • Hernan Cortes, “Second Letter to the Spanish Crown” (pp. 38-42)

  • John Smith, from A Description of New England (pp. 69-72)

  • Anne Bradstreet, “To My Dear and Loving Husband” (p.120)

  • Thomas Paine, “Common Sense” (pp.324-336)

-How to Annotate a Text


Reading assignments due Tuesday: American Literature, 1700-1820 (pp. 157-169); Benjamin Franklin, From The Autobiography Part II (pp. 293-308)


T: APA Introduction/Writing Review
Review and discuss: American Literature, 1700-1820 (pp. 157-169); Benjamin Franklin, From The Autobiography Part II (pp. 293-308)
Read and discuss: American Literature, 1820-1865 (pp. 445-466); Edgar Allan Poe (pp. 683-687); “Annabel Lee” (pp. 691-692); “The Raven” (pp. 688-691); “Annabel Lee” (pp. 691-692); “The Tell-Tale Heart” (pp. 714-718)
In-class Writing Assignment 1: Write a 1 page response (250-300 words) with a minimum of 2 quotes to the following prompt:

    1. Write an analysis of 1-3 of the literary works we have read thus far, and explain the historical significance of the literature.

Reading Assignment Due on Thursday: Have read Washington Irving, “Rip Van Winkle” (pp. 470-482); American Literature, 1865-1914 (pp. 1265-1281)

TH: Review and discuss “Rip Van Winkle” (pp. 470-482) and American Literature, 1865-1914 (pp. 1265-1281)

Read and discuss: Nathaniel Hawthorne (pp. 603-606); “Young Goodman Brown,” (pp. 619-628); Emily Dickinson (pp. 1189-1193)



SDS: You must come to class before SDS. Attendance will be taken in each SDS meeting, so please make sure that you are in attendance.

Review literature

Introduction to the Research Paper

APA and writing review



In-class writing #2

Reading Assignment Due Monday: Henry James, Daisy Miller: A Study (pp. 1508-1549)Kate Chopin (pp. 1604-1605); “Désirée’s Baby” (pp. 1605-1609)

Suggested Learning Activities: Lectures, class discussions, group activities, audio/visuals, informal presentations, poetry readings

Evaluation: Pre-test, quizzes, discussions, writing assignments



WEEK 2

Learning Objective(s): 1, 2, 3, 4



M: Test #1 on Week 1 readings

Review Literature



Read and discuss: Charlotte Perkins Gilman (pp. 1668-1669); “The Yellow Wallpaper” (pp. 1669-1681); American Literature, 1914-1945 (pp. 1837-1856)

In-class Writing Workshop #1 (Write 1 page of your research paper, find 2-3 resources, and be ready to present to the class on Tuesday)

T: Read and discuss: Emily Dickinson, 260 “I’m Nobody, Who Are You?” (p. 1197); 479 “Because I Could Not Stop for Death” (p. 1206); Robert Frost (pp. 1912-1926); William Faulkner, “A Rose for Emily: (pp. 2178-2188)

5 minute presentations on paper topic and 1st page due

Midterm Review



TH: Midterm

*Friday is the last day to Withdraw from the course.

Reading assignment due Monday: “The Man Who Was Almost a Man” pp. 2245-2253; “Good Country People” pp. 2524-2537

Suggested Learning Activities: Lectures, class discussions, group activities, audio/visuals, informal presentations, poetry readings

Evaluation: Quizzes, discussions, writing assignments, mid-term examination



WEEK 3

Learning Objective(s): 1, 2, 3, 4

M: Mid-point Reports

Read and discuss the following: Tennessee Williams, A Streetcar Named Desire (pp. 2297-2361); William Carlos Williams, “The Widow’s Lament in Springtime” (p. 1965); “This is Just to Say” (pp. 1968-1969); E. E. Cummings, “O Sweet Spontaneous” (pp. 2137-2138); “Anyone lived in a pretty how town” (p. 2141)


In-class writing #3


Reading Assignment Due on Tuesday: F. Scott Fitzgerald, “Winter Dreams” (pp. 2147-2164)


T: Read and discuss: T.S. Eliot, “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” (pp. 2003-2009); Zora Neale Hurston, “How it Feels to be Colored Me” (pp. 2123-2127); selected poems by Langston Hughes (pp. 2221-2229)

Watch a segment from The Great Gatsby

In-class Writing Workshop #2

Reading Assignment Due Thursday: Have read Ernest Hemingway (pp. 2203-2205); “The Snows of Kilimanjaro” (pp. 2205-2221)



TH: 5-7 page Literary Research Paper due; review and discuss Ernest Hemingway (pp. 2203-2205); “The Snows of Kilimanjaro” (pp. 2205-2221)

Test #2 on readings from Thursday, Week 2-readings due on Thursday, Week 3

Peer Review

Read and discuss: Alice Walker pp. 2714-2715; “Everyday Use” pp. 2715-2721

Pre-registration



In-class Writing Assignment #4

Reading Assignment Due Tuesday: Adrienne Rich, “Storm Warnings,” “Snapshots of a Daughter-in-Law,” “Diving into the Wreck” (pp. 2563-2572)


Suggested Learning Activities: Lectures, class discussions, group activities, audio/visuals, informal presentations, poetry readings, drama readings

Evaluation: Quizzes, discussions, writing assignments



WEEK 4

Learning Objective(s): 1, 2, 3, 4

M: Review and discuss poems by Adrienne Rich

Read and discuss: Selected poems by Sylvia Plath (pp. 2602-2608); Anne Sexton’s poem “Sylvia’s Death” (pp. 2559-2560); Martin Luther King, Jr., “I Have a Dream” (pp.2577-2582)

In-class APA and paraphrase activity



In-class Writing #5

T: Final exam review and Writing and Revision Workshop

TH: Final Exam and Post-test; Literary Research Paper Revision Due

Academic Calendar Semester II

06/3/13-06/28/13 Term B Classes Begin

07/01/13-08/24/13 Term C Classes Begin

07/04/13 Independence Day

07/05/13 Return



08/25/13-09/1/13 Summer Break

Attendance

Class attendance is mandatory and imperative for student success. If you plan on missing class, will be late, or need to leave early, please let me know ahead of time and understand that it is your responsibility to complete all assignments to the best of your ability and turn them in on time.
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