Academic Content Standards



Download 71,45 Kb.
Page1/6
Date conversion18.09.2017
Size71,45 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6

Academic Content Standards

  • History (Civil War and Reconstruction) 8th Grade:
  • Describe and analyze the territorial expansion of the United States including: a. Northwest Ordinance; b. The Louisiana Purchase and the Lewis and Clark expedition; c. Westward movement including Manifest Destiny; d. The Texas War for Independence and the Mexican-American War.
  • 9. Explain causes of the Civil War with emphasis on: a. Slavery; b. States' rights;

Run Time: [18:14] Discusses the movement of Americans to the Western Frontier, explains the idea of Manifest Destiny, and also gives information on the Gold Rush, which lured more Americans westward as well

Run Time: [26:20] Discusses the events that led to western settlement, the war for Texas independence, the California Gold Rush, and life on the Prairie.

Chapter Manifest Destiny 12 1818-1853

  • The United States was made up of people who had emigrated from many places in the world.
  • Our first national motto was, "E Pluribus Unum" its Latin for "One from many" or "One from many parts." It refers to the welding of a single federal state from a group of individual political units -- originally colonies and now states.
  • Many Americans remained on the move as the United States extended its political borders and grew economically.
  • Richard Caton Woodville’s War News from Mexico,
  • first exhibited in 1848, was perhaps the most
  • popular of the political paintings. This lithograph
  • was one of some 14,000 prints sold.
  • L. S. D. Rees
  • "The American Flag" [circa 1840s]
  • A New National Lyric.
  • Words By Revd. J.B. Dickson of Scotland.
  • Music by L.S.D. Rees, Philadelphia
  • [Unknown publisher]
  • Gilmour & Dean, Litho.
  • [Source: 087/005@Levy]
  • 1. Float forth thou flag of the free!
  • Flash far over land and sea,
  • Proud ensign of liberty Hail Hail Hail to thee!
  • The blue of the Heav’ns is thine,
  • The stars on thy canvas shine.
  • Thy heraldry tells thee divine;
  • Hail Hail to thee.
  • Thy white proclaims thee unstain’d
  • Thy crimson thy love unfeign’d,
  • To man by des pots enchain’d.
  • Hail Hail to Thee Hail Hail to thee!
  • CHORUS [sung after each VERSE]
  • Float forth the flag of the Free
  • Flash far over land and sea
  • Till the world shout liberty!
  • Hail Hail Hail to thee!
  • Hail to thee
  • Hail to thee
  • Hail Hail to thee
  • Hail to thee!
  • Hail to thee
  • Hail Hail to thee thee!
  • 2. Float forth thou flag of the free!
  • Flash far over land and sea
  • Proud ensign of liberty
  • Hail Haul Hail to thee!
  • Under thy God giv’n light
  • Our Fathers went forth to fight,
  • ’Gainst sceptr’d wrong for the right;
  • Hail Hail to thee
  • Again thy stars light the way
  • We search in UNITED array.
  • The Hydra of theason to slay
  • Hail Hail to Thee Hail Hail to Thee!

A look at the Music of the 1840s

  • 1 Buffalo Gals 1844
  • 2.Annie Laurie, 1850
  • Buffalo Gals (porch music) - YouTube
  • 5"Lubly Fan Will You Come Out To Night?" (1844) Composed by Cool White
  • [aka "Buffalo Gals"]
  • As I was lumb'ring down de street down de street down de street A pretty girl I chanc'd to meet O she was fair to view CHORUS Den lubly Fan will you cum out to night, will you cum out to night, will you cum out to night, Den lubly Fan will you cum out to night, An dance by de lite ob de moon.
  • 2. I stopt her an I had some talk, Had some talk, Had some talk, But her foot covered up de whole side walk And left no room for me. (CHORUS) 3. She's de prettiest gal ibe seen in my life, Seen in my life, Seen in my life, An I wish to de Lord she was my wife, Den we would part no more. .
  • Her lips are like de oyster plant,
  • De oyster plant,
  • De oyster plant,
  • I try to kiss dem but I cant,
  • Dey am so berry large.
  • (CHORUS)
  • 6.
  • Oh make haste Fan dont make me wait,
  • Make me wait,
  • Make me wait,
  • I fear you've kept me now too late,
  • Yes dare's de ebening gun.
  • (CHORUS)
  • 7.
  • Yes lubly Fan will you cum out to night,
  • Cum out to night,
  • Cum out to night,
  • Yes lubly Fan will you cum out to night,
  • And dance by de light ob de moon.
  • CHORUS
  • Lubly Fan is cumming out to night
  • Cumming out to night
  • Cumming out to night
  • [Lubly Fan is cumming out to night]
  • Far to dance by de lite of de moon.
  • [for "Buffalo Gals"]
  • 1.
  • As I was lumb'ring down the street,
  • Down the street, down the street,
  • A handsome gal I chanc'd to meet;
  • Oh! she was fair to view.
  • [CHORUS]
  • Buffalo gals, can't you come out to night?
  • Can't you come out to night?
  • Can't you come out to night?
  • And dance by de light ob de moon.
  • 2.
  • I ax'd her would she hab some talk,
  • Hab some talk, hab some talk,
  • Her feet cover'd up de whole sidewalk,
  • As she stood close by me.
  • (CHORUS)
  • 3.
  • Annie Laurie" (c. 1850)
  • Scotch Ballad
  • Sung by Jenny Lind, 1820-1887
  • Arranged by Finley Dun, 1795-1853
  • 1.
  • Max-welton braes are bonnie,
  • Where early fa's the dew,
  • And it's there that Annie Laurie
  • Gie'd me her promise true;
  • Gied me her promise true,
  • Which ne'er forgot will be,
  • And for bonnie Annie Laurie
  • I'd lie me doune and dee.
  • 2.
  • Her brow is like the snaw drift
  • Her throat is like the swan;
  • Her face it is the fairest
  • That e'er the sun shone on.
  • That e'er the sun shone on,
  • And dark blue is her e'er;
  • And for bonnie Annie Laurie
  • I'd lay lay me doune and dee.
  • 3.
  • Like dew on the gowan lying
  • Is the fa' o' her fairy feet;
  • And like winds in summer sighing,
  • Her voice is low and sweet.
  • Her voice is low and sweet
  • And she is a' the world to me,
  • And for bonnie Annie Laurie
  • I'd lay we doune and dee.
  • To George Francis Train Esq.
  • "Ho! Westward Ho!" (circa 1850s)
  • [Words and Music?] by Ossian E. Dodge
  • [Source: facsimile copy on pp. 301-304 from
  • "Songs of Yesterday: A Song Anthology of
  • American Life" by Philip D. Jordan and Lillian
  • Kessler (Garden City, NY: Doubleday, Doran
  • & Co., Inc., 1941)]
  • 1. “The Star of Empire” poets say,
  • Ho! Westward Ho!
  • “Forever takes its onward way!”
  • Ho! Westward Ho!
  • That this be proven in our land,
  • Ho! Westward Ho!
  • It seems Jehovah’s great command,
  • Ho! Westward Ho!
  • CHORUS [sung after each verse]
  • Ho! Westward!
  • Soon the world shall know
  • That all is grand
  • In the western land;
  • Ho! Westward Ho!
  • 2. Our Pilgrim Fathers sang the song,—
  • Ho! Westward Ho!
  • Hear Right should triumph over Wrong?
  • Ho! Westward Ho!
  • Still— westward many thousands flock,
  • Ho! Westward Ho!
  • And sing the shout from Plymough Rock,
  • Ho! Westward Ho!
  • 3. Tis ever thus, the people cry,
  • Ho! Westward Ho!
  • And from the eastern citites fly,
  • Ho! Westward Ho!
  • To live on God’s most glorious land,
  • Ho! Westward Ho!
  • Where hearts and thoughts are ever grand!
  • Ho! Westward Ho!
  • 4. The western fields, give thousands wealth,
  • Ho! Westward Ho!
  • And yield to all a glowing health,
  • Ho! Westward Ho!
  • For all inclined to honest toil,
  • Ho! Westward Ho!
  • Secure their fortunes from the soil,
  • Ho! Westward Ho!
  • 5. We hear a thousand men relate,
  • Ho! Westward Ho!
  • They wandered to some westest State,
  • Ho! Westward Ho!
  • Without a hope their lives to save,
  • Ho! Westward Ho!
  • The climate snatched them from the grave;
  • Ho! Westward Ho!
  • 6. We love the glorious western land,
  • Ho! Westward Ho!
  • For here the peoples’ hearts expand,
  • Ho! Westward Ho!
  • And on the prairies broad and grand,
  • Ho! Westward Ho!
  • We all can see Jehovah’s hand,
  • Ho! Westward Ho!
  • 3. Ossian E. Dodge 1849
  • "De Blue Tail Fly" (1846)
  • (A Negro Song)
  • by C. H. Keith ?
  • 1.
  • O when you come in summer time,
  • To South Carlinar's sultry clime,
  • If in de shade you chance to lie,
  • You'll soon find out de blue tail fly,
  • An scratch 'im wid a brier too.
  • 2.
  • Dar's many kind ob dese here tings,
  • From different sort ob insects springs;
  • Some hatch in June, and some July,
  • But August fetches de blue tail fly,
  • An scratch 'im wid a brier too.
  • 3.
  • When I was young a us'd to wait
  • On Massa's table and hand de plate;
  • I'd pass de bottle when he dry,
  • And bresh away de blue tail fly.
  • An scratch 'im wid a brier too.
  • 4.
  • Den arter dinner massa sleep,
  • He bid me vigilance to keep;
  • An when he gwine to shut he eye,
  • He tell me watch de blue tail fly.
  • An scratch 'im wid a brier too.
  • 5.
  • An' when he ride in de arternoon,
  • I foller wid a hickory broom;
  • De poney being berry shy,
  • When bitten by de blue tail fly,
  • An scratch 'im wid a brier too.
  • 6.
  • One day he rode aroun' de farm,
  • De flies so numerous did swarm;
  • One chance to bite 'im on de thigh,
  • De debble take dat blu tail fly,
  • An scratch 'im wid a brier too.
  • 7.
  • De poney run, he jump an pitch,
  • An tumble massa in de ditch;
  • He died, an de jury wonder why,
  • De verdict was de "blue tail fly,"
  • An scratch 'im wid a brier too.
  • 8.
  • Dey laid 'im under a simmon tree,
  • His epitaph am dar to see;
  • Beneath dis stone I'm forced to lie,
  • All by means ob de blue tail fly,
  • An scratch 'im wid a brier too.
  • 9.
  • Ole Massa's gone, now let him rest,
  • Dey say all tings am for de best;
  • I nebber forget till de day I die,
  • Ole Massa an de blue tail fly,
  • An scratch 'im wid a brier too.
  • 10.
  • De hornet gets in your eyes an nose,
  • De 'skeeter bites y'r through your close,
  • De gallnipper sweeten high,
  • But wusser yet de blue tail fly,
  • An scratch 'im wid a brier too.
  • 4. C. H. Keith ? 1846
  • "Away in Mexico" (1847)
  • The Words Taken From the
  • Scientific American,
  • Music Composed and Presented to the
  • Alleghanians,
  • by
  • Austin Phillips.
  • and sung by
  • Caroline Hiffert.
  • New York : William Hall & Son, 239 Broadway
  • Sung by Caroline Hiffert
  • Dedicatee: [the Alleghanians]
  • Lith. By Sarony & Major, 117 Fulton St. N.Y.
  • Plate number: 4181
  • [Source: 018/008@Levy]
  • 1.
  • Despondency is all the rage
  • And moping all the go,
  • Our husbands, sweethearts, all are gone
  • Away to Mexico!
  • Some never smile; some offer sobs;
  • Some cry, outright, with woe;
  • Till one would think mankind were all
  • Away in Mexico.
  • One would think mankind were all
  • Away in Mexico.
  • 2.
  • You ask Miss Snooks, “Why, what ails you?”
  • Her tone is sad and low,
  • As she replies— “My George has gone
  • Away to Mexico!”
  • Some wives who used to vex their lords,
  • Until they jump’d Jim Crow,
  • Now cry they long to be with them,
  • Away to Mexico.
  • 3.
  • But when dear HUBBY does come back,
  • (It always turns out so)
  • How oft, poor soul, he’ll wish he was
  • Away in Mexico.
  • Some wives have faces three feet long,
  • The reason I don’t know,
  • But think they dread their lords may come
  • Away from Mexico.
  • 4.
  • There’s Mrs. Stubbs, the other day,
  • Was talking very slow
  • About her grief for poor, dear Stubbs
  • Away in Mexico.
  • And, all the time, here eyes were fix’d
  • On handsome Captain DOUGH,
  • Worth fifty of her husband— Stubbs—
  • Away in Mexico.
  • 5.
  • But all that wives are now about
  • I do not choose to show,
  • But think their husbands better come
  • Away from Mexico.
  • But I’m a maid, and have no lord,
  • Although I have a beau,
  • Who’se gone, among the volunteers,
  • Away to Mexico.
  • 6.
  • I’m true to him— yet love to flirt—
  • And have a youth in tow,
  • Who’d do as well, were poor Charles hurt,
  • Away in Mexico.
  • So, ladies, dry your weeping eyes,
  • Nor let their currents flow;
  • We’ve chaps on hand as good as those
  • Away in Mexico.
  • 7.
  • Then, whilst our hearts are free as winds
  • That from the northwest blow,
  • We’ll letters write to gull our swains
  • Away in Mexico.
  • POSTSCRIPT
  • “Whilst shine the sun,” the proverb says,
  • “Your hay you’d better mow,”
  • So, verbum sap to those who’ve lords
  • Away in Mexico.
  • 5. Austin Phillips 1847
    • Stephen Foster wrote the original lyrics in 1847.
    • "Oh Susannah" was set with new lyrics and became known as the "forty-niners" theme song. This version was sung by miners during the California Gold Rush.
    • I come from Alabama With my banjo on my knee I'm going to Louisiana, My true love for to see It rained all night The day I left The weather it was dry The sun so hot, I froze to death Susanna, don't you cry Oh, Susanna, Oh don't you cry for me For I come from Alabama With my banjo on my knee I had a dream the other night When everything was still I thought I saw Susanna A-coming down the hill The buckwheat cake Was in her mouth The tear was In her eye Says I, I'm coming from the south Susanna, don't you cry Oh, Susanna, Oh don't you cry for me For I come from Alabama With my banjo on my knee
    •  
    • I came from Salem City with my washpan on my knee I'm going to California, the gold dust for to see.
    • It rained all night the day I left, the weather it was dry The sun so hot I froze to death, Oh, brothers don't you cry.
    • Oh, Susannah, Oh, don't you cry for me I'm going to California with my washpan on my knee.
    • I soon shall be in Frisco and there I'll look around. And when I see the gold lumps there, I'll pick them off the ground.
    • I'll scrape the mountains clean, my boys, I'll drain the rivers dry. A pocketful of rocks bring home, So, brothers don't you cry.
  • 6. James Gaspard Maeder 1847
  1   2   3   4   5   6


The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2016
send message

    Main page