AA/as degree modesto junior college



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AA/AS Degree





MODESTO JUNIOR COLLEGE


Date Originally Submitted:

2/10/1998

Non-Degree





COURSE OUTLINE


Date Updated:

2/17/2004

Noncredit









I.

DIVISION:

Science, Mathematics, and Engineering

DIV./DEPT. NO:


51/3500




PREFIX/NO.:

CHEM 144  

COURSE TITLE:


Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry













Formerly listed as:

     


Date Changed:

     







II.

ALSO OFFERED AS:







Div:



Prefix/No.:

           

Title:

     




Div:



Prefix/No.:

           

Title:

     







III.

COURSE INFORMATION:




Units: 4 or Variable Units: X=1/2 unit A=1 unit B=2 units C=3 units D=4 units




Total Hours: Lecture: 52.50 Lab: 52.50 Other:      




Explain Other hours:      




Transfer Credit: CSU – UC – CAN – CHEM 8




General Ed: AA/AS Area: CSU GE Area: IGETC Area:




Offered Only: Fall – Spring – Summer – Eve – Not offered every semester –






IV.

PREREQUISITE(S)/COREQUISITE(S)/RECOMMENDED FOR SUCCESS:




(Please check all that apply and list below. Also attach appropriate documentation forms)




Prerequisite (P) – Corequisite (C) – Recommended for Success (R) – Limitation on Enrollment (L) –




Satisfactory completion of CHEM 142 or CHEM 143

V.

CATALOG DESCRIPTION:







Basic principles of organic and biochemistry. Uses inductive and deductive problem solving methods.




VI.

FIELD TRIPS REQUIRED?

Yes



No



Maybe















VII.

GRADING:

A-F Only



CR/NC Only



CR/NC Option



Non-Graded















VIII.

REPEAT PROCEDURES:

Credit:

No



*Yes



Maximum Completions:

  

Maximum Units:

   



















Non-Credit:

No



Yes



Maximum Completions:

  







*(If course is repeatable, attach a memo with the appropriate justification)      




IX.

EXPLAIN FEE REQUIRED:

     







Material fees may be required for goggles





  1. PREREQUISITE SKILLS
    Before entering the course, the student will be able to:


    1. apply the principles of the scientific method to solve basic chemical concepts.

    2. apply the principles of dimensional analysis to unit conversions.

    3. define and identify phases of matter.

    4. differentiate between pure elements, pure compounds, homogenous and heterogenous mixtures.

    5. differentiate between physical and chemical properties and changes.

    6. define subatomic particles, cations, anions and isotopes.

    7. identify atomic number and mass of an element on the periodic table.

    8. name binary compounds consisting of metals and nonmetals and two nonmetals.

    9. apply Avogadro’s number to mole and mass measurements.

    10. calculate molar mass.

    11. write balance chemical equation and identify type of equation.

    12. use molar ratios to calculate moles (or mass) of chemicals consumed or produced as well as percent yield taking into account limiting reagents.

    13. write an electronic configuration for elements through atomic number 36.

    14. differentiate between ionic, covalent and polar convalent bonds.

    15. write the Lewis dot structure and predict the shape (using VSEPR theory) of chemical compounds.

    16. describe and identify intermolecular bonding.

    17. identify periodic trends between metals, metalloids and nonmetals.

    18. predict the effect of changing pressure, volume, temperature or number of moles on a gaseous system holdling one or more of these variables constant.

    19. calculate an unknown variable in a gas law.

    20. define vapor pressure, surface tension and boiling point of substances.

    21. describe the features of a heating cooling curve.

    22. calculate mass percent, mass/volume percent and volume percent of a solution.

    23. calculate molarity, molality and osmotic pressure and osmolarity of a solution.

    24. differentiate between strong and weak acids; strong and weak bases.

    25. calculate pH and (H+).

    26. calculate the proper ratio of weak acid or base to conjugate cation or anion to prepare buffer solution of defined pH.

    27. define and calculate the following equilibrium constants: Kw, Ka, and Ksp.

    28. identify oxidized and reduced elements in a single replacement reaction.

    29. define  and  particles and  rays.

    30. identify medical uses of radioactivity.

    31. identify families of organic compounds

    32. apply chemical principles to laboratory procedures.



  1. OBJECTIVES (Expected outcomes for students)
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:


    1. Identify the families of Organic compounds and their functional groups.

    2. Describe bonding in Alkanes, Alkenes, Alkynes.

    3. By using the IUPAC nomenclature draw and name: Alkanes, Alkenes, Alcholos and Ethers, Aldenhydes, and Ketones; Carboxylic acids and Esters, Amines and Amides

    4. Solve written problems in involving steroisomerism: distinguish between constitutional isomers and stereoisomers, distinguish between chiral and achiral molecules, draw enantiomers and diastereomers of compounds with one and two tetrahedral stereocenters

    5. Predict products of organic reactions involving Alkanes, Alkenes, Alchohols and Ethers, Aldehydes and Ketones, Carboxylic acids and esters, Amines and Amides

    6. Characterize compounds using physical, chemical, and spectral properties

    7. Identify and draw structures of carbonhydrates, amino acids, nucleic acids

    8. Separate and purify compounds using techniques such as: recrystallization, distillation, chromatography



  1. CONTENT


    1. Properties and reactivity of the functional groups:

      1. Alkanes

      2. Alkenes, alkynes

      3. Alkyl halides

      4. Alcohols

      5. Carbonyls

      6. Carboxylic acids and derivatives

      7. Amines

      8. Aromatics

      9. Polyfunctional molecules

    2. Bonding and structure of organic molecules including

      1. Lewis structure

      2. Hybrid orbitals

      3. isomers

    3. IUPAC Nomenclature of

      1. Alkanes

      2. Alkenes

      3. Alcohols and Ethers

      4. Aldehydes and Ketones

      5. Carboxylic acids and Esters

      6. Amines and Amides



    1. Steroisomerism

      1. Chiral molecules

      2. Enantiomers

      3. Diastereomers

      4. Optical Activity

    2. Introduction to Spectroscopy

      1. IR

      2. NMR

      3. UV

    3. Simple Organic Reactions involving or producing

      1. Alkanes

      2. Alkenes

      3. Alcohols and Ethers

      4. Aldenhydes and Ketones

      5. Carboxylic acids and Esters

      6. Amines and Amides

    4. Structure and metabolism of

      1. Carbonhydrates (sugars)

      2. Lipids

      3. Proteins

      4. Amino acids

      5. Nucleic Acids



  1. TEACHING METHODS




    1. Methods to achieve course objectives:

      1. Relevant material is presented through class lectures and lecture/laboratory demonstrations.

      2. Students perform laboratory experiments that reinforce and expand upon concepts in lecture.



    1. Typical assignments used in achieving learner independence and critical thinking:

      1. Problem solving via assignments from both lecture and laboratory texts.

      2. Reports on laboratory experiments that critically evaluate the results of the experiments.



  1. TEXTBOOKS AND OTHER READINGS (Typical)


    1. Required texts:

      1. Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry, 7th Edition, 2004, Bettelheim, Brooks/Cole

      2. Lab Exploration for Chem 144, 1977, Webb-Kummer, MJC Syllabus, Duplicating



    1. Other readings:



  1. SPECIAL STUDENT MATERIALS (i.e., protective eyewear, aprons, etc.)

A. Protective goggles are required and can be purchased via MJC (fee not included in continuation course).


  1. METHODS OF EVALUATING STUDENT PROGRESS


    1. Examinations and quizzes consisting of problem solving and short essay type questions

    2. Instructor’s evaluation of weekly laboratory reports

    3. Instructor’s evaluation of yields and purity of compounds synthesized in the laboratory



* = Multi-cultural objective or content item Rev 5/2002


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