A level and btec course Outlines On offer for September 2017



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General/Course Objectives - Students will develop:

  • Intellectual, imaginative, creative and intuitive capabilities

  • Investigative, analytical, experimental, practical, technical and expressive skills, aesthetic understanding and critical judgement

  • Independence of mind in developing, refining and communicating their own ideas, their own intentions and their own personal outcomes

  • An interest in, enthusiasm for and enjoyment of Photography.

  • Their experience of working with a broad range of media

  • Knowledge and experience of real-world contexts and, where appropriate, links to the creative industries

  • Knowledge and understanding of Photography in contemporary and past societies and cultures


Component 1 - Title: Personal Investigation

  • Internally set, assessed by the teacher and externally moderated

  • Incorporates 3 major elements: supporting studies, practical work, and a personal study

  • First assessment: 60% of the total qualification. Overview of content this component allows students opportunities to generate and develop ideas, research primary and contextual sources, record practical and written observations, experiment with media and processes, and refine ideas towards producing personal resolved outcome(s).


Component 2 - Title: Externally Set Assignment

  • Externally set, assessed by the teacher and externally moderated.

  • First assessment: 40% of the total qualification

  • Incorporates two major elements: preparatory studies and the 15–hour period of sustained focus

  • Preparatory studies will comprise a portfolio of practical and written development work based on the Externally Set Assignment.

  • The 15–hour period of sustained focus under examination conditions may take place over multiple sessions (a maximum of five, within three consecutive weeks).

Engineering BTEC
Qualification: BTEC Level 3 Certificate

Exam Board: Edexcel

Entry Criteria: GCSE grade C/5 in Mathematics.
General/Course Objectives:

Engineering is a dynamic sector, which offers huge potential for students. Engineering turnover was £1.1 trillion in the year ending March 2012, and the sector accounts for 24.5 per cent of the turnover of all enterprise in the UK. The UK is regarded as a world leader in engineering sectors, including renewable energy, space, low carbon, aerospace, creative industries, utilities, automotive, agri-food and bioscience. Between 2010 and 2020 engineering enterprises are projected to have 2.74 million job openings, including more than 400,000 technician roles as the predominantly ageing workforce in the area is expected to retire.

It is suggested that learners wishing to study BTEC Engineering at Level 3 must achieve at least a 5 grade in GCSE Mathematics. Everyone taking this qualification will study mandatory units, covering the following content areas:

  • Mathematics for Engineering

  • Engineering Principles

  • Mechanical Principles




  • Product Design

  • Engineering Processes

  • Project Management

Year 12 Course Units:

Unit 1 – Engineering Principles (External - 2 hours written exam/ 80 marks)

Unit 2 – Delivery of an Engineered Process in Teams (Internal)
Year 13 Course Units:

Unit 3 – Engineering Product Design and Manufacture (External - 10 hours case study exam/ 60 marks)

Unit 44 – Fabrication Manufacturing Processes (Internal)
Assessment: Each unit has criteria set out to achieve either a Level 3 Pass (equivalent to an E), Merit (equivalent to a C) or Distinction (equivalent to an A) and there is one coursework and one exam per year. The units are taught in conjunction with local industry and through both practical and theory lessons, with learners manufacturing the following example products:


  • Phone holder – made using a manual Centre and CNC Lathe and anodising techniques

  • Screwdriver – made in batch using the manual centre lathe, CNC lathe and plastic dip coating

  • Tool box – made using galvanised steel and a variety of metal fabrication techniques

Suitable for students considering Further Education and Apprenticeships and careers as Car Mechanics, Plumbers, Electricians, Manufacturers, Surveyor, Car Designer, Drafter, IT Technician, Architect, Civil Engineer, career in the Forces, Pilot.

Graphic Communication
Qualification: A-Level (Linear)

Exam Board: OCR

Entry Criteria: GCSE grade B in Graphic Products or GCSE Art desirable but not essential.
General/Course Objectives:

An exciting course which offers candidates a rounded exposure to different aspects of graphic communication, including illustration, packaging and advertising, allowing students to display their abilities in a variety of disciplines and demonstrate their understanding of these contexts. Students will study the work of a range of graphics designers and illustrators to inform and aid the development of their own individual style.

The theory content is delivered through several mini coursework projects and there is no formal written exam, but instead a themed ‘live’ exam where students make a series of product(s) based around a given theme and the graphic style they have developed.
Year 12 Course Units:

Unit 1: Coursework Portfolio

Candidates produce a portfolio of work through a number of small projects, including illustration techniques, photography, mark making, typography, Photoshop, colour theory, logo design, packaging and branding.


Unit 2: PPE Controlled Assignment

Based on the ‘urban landscapes’ research collected from the trip to photograph street art in Bristol, candidates are given a minimum of six weeks in which to plan and prepare for a live 5 hour exam where final outcomes will be produced.


Year 13 Course Units:

Unit 3: Personal Investigation (60%)

Candidates choose a design brief which has a personal significance and submit one major project that evidences primary, secondary research, development and making skills.


Unit 4 – Controlled Assignment (40%)

Based on an early release paper (January), candidates are given a minimum of eight weeks in which to plan and prepare for a live 15 hour exam where a variety of final outcomes will be produced.

Hospitality BTEC
Qualification: BTEC

Exam Board: Pearson BTEC

Entry Criteria: 5 GCSE Grades A*-C. GCSE Grade C from a food related course is desirable

but not essential.
General/Course Objectives:

The BTEC Level 3 in Hospitality qualification is the equivalent to 1 A-Level and consists of 100% coursework.

This is an exciting subject which is a careful mix of practical investigations and learning about extremely relevant issues in this ever-changing and diverse society within the hospitality industry.

Practical work is carried out each week, when there is an opportunity to try out creative and innovative ideas.



Topics covered in the course include:

  • Contemporary World Food

  • Providing Customer Service

  • Advance Skills and Techniques in Producing Desserts and Petit Fours

  • Planning and Managing a Hospitality Event

In addition, all candidates will be able to take the Level 2 Food Hygiene examination

 Where can it take me?

Such an interesting and stimulating course is ideal for all students, as you learn about the hospitality industry, advanced cooking skills and how to budget and prepare meals. Such skills are essential throughout your entire life and, at the same time, you have the opportunity to gain an additional qualification.

Students who succeed at BTEC L3 in Hospitality could progress onto a professional apprenticeship, study at Higher Education or degree level. It can lead onto a range of hospitality and catering careers including hotels, restaurants, cruise ships and conference centres . 




Course is delivered by Ridgeway Sixth Form

Product Design – 3D Design


Qualification: AS/A2 Level

Exam Board: OCR

Entry Criteria: It is desirable to have at least a grade B in GCSE Product Design, L2M in BTEC Engineering, or GCSE Graphics but it is not essential.

General/Course Objectives:

I.M.O. – Idea, Materials & Object

A new and exciting course which offers candidates a rounded exposure to different aspects of 3d dimensional design and construction form. This course covers the following five specialist areas: ceramics, set design, product design, environmental/ architectural design and jewellery design. Students use a variety of disciplines and demonstrate their understanding of these contexts. Students will study the work of a range of designers to inform and aid the development of their own individual style. The theory content is delivered through several mini coursework projects and there is no formal written exam, but instead a themed ‘live’ exam where students make a series of product(s) based around a given theme and the design style they have developed.


Year 12 Course Units:
Coursework Portfolio: Candidates produce a portfolio of work from starting points, topics or themes determined by their centre. The focus is on including work that shows exploration, research, acquisition of techniques and skills.
Controlled Assignment: Candidates select one starting point from an early release question paper.

  • Candidates must be given a minimum of 3 weeks to plan and prepare.

  • Candidates are given 5 hours of controlled time to work on developing their idea into

a realization/outcome.
Year 13 Course Units:
Personal Investigation: Candidates submit one major project which has a personal significance. The investigation includes a related personal study that must be between 1000 – 3000 words.
Controlled Assignment: Candidates select one starting point from an early release question paper.

  • Candidates must be given a minimum of 3 weeks to plan and prepare.

  • In 15 hours of controlled time, candidates work to plan and then realize ideas into a final outcome.

Textiles
Qualification: A-Level (Linear)

Exam Board: OCR

Entry Criteria: GCSE grade B in Textiles desirable but not essential.
General/Course Objectives:

Creating visual and tactile meaning through expressive, functional or decorative responses by selecting and manipulating fabrics. Demonstrating the use of a range of processes such as fashion design drawing, garment construction, accessory design and surface decoration.


Year 12 Course Units:

Unit 1: Coursework Portfolio

Candidates produce a portfolio of work through a number of small projects, including illustration techniques, photography, mark making, typography, Photoshop, colour theory, logo design, packaging and branding.


Unit 2: PPE Controlled Assignment

Based on the ‘urban landscapes’ research collected from the trip to photograph street art in Bristol, candidates are given a minimum of six weeks in which to plan and prepare for a live 5 hour exam where final outcomes will be produced.


Year 13 Course Units:

Unit 3: Personal Investigation (60%)
Candidates choose a design brief which has a personal significance and submit one major project that evidences primary, secondary research, development and making skills.
The coursework includes a related 1000-3000 word personal study.
Unit 4 – Controlled Assignment (40%)
Based on an early release paper (January), candidates are given a minimum of eight weeks in which to plan and prepare for a live 15 hour exam where a variety of final outcomes will be produced.

English Language


Qualification: A2 (Linear A-Level)

Exam Board: AQA

Entry Criteria: GCSE English Language Grade B/6

Course Content:

  • Textual Variations and Representations

  • Children’s Language Development

  • Language Diversity and Change

  • Language Discourses

  • Language Investigation

  • Original Writing

Exam Breakdown:

  • Paper 1: Language, the Individual and Society (40% of A-Level)



  • Section A - Textual Variations and Representations

  • Section B - Child Language Development



  • Paper 2: Language Diversity and Change (40% of A-level)



  • Section A - Language Diversity and Change

  • Section B - Language Discourses



  • Non-exam assessment: Language in Action (20% of A-level)



  • Language Investigation 2,000 words

  • Original Writing and commentary 1,500 words

English Literature


Qualification: A2 (Linear A-Level)

Exam Board: AQA

Entry Criteria: GCSE English Literature Grade B/6
Course Content:

Core Content:


  • Love through the Ages

  • Texts in Shared Contexts

  • Independent Critical Study: Texts across Time


Options:


  • WW1 and its Aftermath

  • Modern Times: Literature from 1945 to the Present Day


Exam Breakdown:


  • Paper 1: Love through the Ages (40% of A-level)




    • Section A – Shakespeare

    • Section B – Unseen Poetry

    • Section C – Comparing Texts




  • Paper 2: Texts in Shared Contexts (40% of A-level)




  • Section A – Set Texts

  • Section B – Contextual Linking




  • Non-exam assessment: Texts across Time (20% of A-level)




    • Comparative critical study of two texts

    • One extended essay 2,500 words

Film Studies



Qualification: A Level (Linear)

Exam Board: OCR

Entry Criteria: A good selection of B and C/5 GCSE grades including English Language
General/Course Objectives:

The OCR A Level in Film Studies will introduce learners to a wide range of films from different national cinemas, from the Silent Era to the present day, incorporating different film forms (shorts, experimental, documentary and fiction) and produced by a diverse variety of authors.

Learners will be introduced to the contexts that surround film-making and to the concepts of genre, representation, narrative, aesthetics and spectatorship.

Learners will develop the critical tools to understand how these concepts are used to create meaning in film by both interrogating and creating film and by developing a working knowledge and understanding of the micro-elements of film form, including:



  • cinematography (including lighting)

  • mise-en-scène

  • editing

  • sound

  • performance

Students will develop the skills to analyse, interpret and compare films critically, communicating ideas effectively through discursive argument, be able to synthesise complex areas of knowledge and show how knowledge of the ways films reflect social, cultural, political, historical and institutional contexts informs analysis/understanding of set films.

Component 1 – Film History: (35% of total A Level)

Develop knowledge of film form through the study of at least three US set films from the Silent Era, 1930-1960, 1961-1990.

Study at least two set films from two major European film movements or stylistic developments - Soviet Montage, German Expressionism, Italian Neo-Realism, French New Wave.
Component 2 – Critical Approaches to Film: (35% of total A Level)

Develop knowledge and understanding of key critical approaches to film and of narrative, genre, representations and spectatorship.

Study at least one set film from each of the categories: Contemporary British, Contemporary US, Documentary, Non-European Non English Language, English Language (Non US), US Independent.

Component 3 / 4 – Making Shot Film (30% of total A Level)

Media Studies


Qualification: A Level (Linear)

Exam Board: OCR

Entry Criteria: A good selection of B and C/5 GCSE grades including English Language

General/Course Objectives:

Throughout this course, learners will study nine different media forms. These are:



 television
 film
 radio
 newspapers
 magazines

 advertising and marketing
 online, social and participatory media
 video games
 music videos.

Three of these media forms (television, newspapers and online, social and participatory media) will be studied in depth, using all four elements of the theoretical framework across the specification.

Media Studies introduces learners to the role and influence of the media. There will be both a historical and contemporary aspect to the specification – covering the role and impact of the media on society, culture, politics and the economy in both domestic and global spheres. Learners will develop their understanding through the consistent application of the four elements of the theoretical framework:



  • media language

  • media representations

  • media industries

  • media audiences

Component 1 – Media Products: (30% of total A Level)

Explore how media products are used by institutions to construct different representations and how media audiences interpret these products. Learners use aspects of the theoretical framework to analyse and evaluate their own cross-media productions.



Component 2 – Media in a Digital Age: (40% of total A Level)

Explore and analyse the ideas and arguments from debates about the media, drawn from a historical perspective, the digital age and global media.



Component 3 – Making Media: (30% of total A Level)

Learners will practically explore the creation of three linked media products in a cross-media production.

Geography

Qualification: A Level (Linear)

Exam Board: AQA

Entry Criteria: GCSE Geography grade C or above & English and Maths grade B/6.

General/Course Objectives:

In September 2016 the new linear Geography A-Level will be launched. This is an exciting new course which blends physical and human geography, with the skills associated with geographical research and fieldwork.



Core Content:

  • Water and Carbon Cycles

  • Landscape Systems

  • Global systems and global governance

  • Changing places




Non-Core Content – may include:

  • Hazards

  • Ecosystems under stress

  • Cold environments

  • Contemporary Urban Environments

  • Population and the environment

  • Resource security







Assessment:
Assessment will be primarily by examinations which make up 80% of the A-level. All students will also produce a unique and independent fieldwork investigation of between 3000-4000 words which accounts for the remaining 20%
Fieldwork:
Fieldwork and fieldtrips are an essential part of the new Geography A-Level. All students need to spend at least 4 days undertaking fieldwork over the two years. It is likely that a residential fieldtrip to Exmoor will be a key component of the fieldwork requirement
Skills:
Through a study of A-Level Geography numerous skills will be developed and honed. These skills are highly transferable and are prized by both employers and higher education establishments. The skills covered are too numerous to list but include data collection, presentation and analysis; sampling, GIS, and use of statistics; use of primary and secondary data; analysis of qualitative and quantitative data; the list goes on!
Future prospects:
Geography is well respected by employers and universities. The top universities respect A-level geographers as they come with knowledge of the world and a wide skills base. It is for this reason that the Russell group of universities consider geography a “Facilitating subject”. Geographers are frequently employed in the following fields: teaching, research, climatology, environmental management, planning, water management, conservation, demography.

History
Qualification: A Level (Linear)



Exam Board: Edexcel

Entry Criteria: GCSE Grade B in History, or equivalent in English and/or Philosophy and Ethics
Course Content:

History is able to broaden your mind by placing you in a different era, country or place; by developing your skills of enquiry; and by encouraging you to consider alternative viewpoints. These are great skills for life as well as for wider academic study. As a result, History is a challenging but rewarding and highly respected subject to study.

It is an excellent springboard into a significant number of career choices such as law, business, accounting, armed forces etc.
Course Units:

Year 12: Revolutions in Early Modern and Modern Europe

Unit 1: Britain 1625-1701 – Conflict, Revolution and Settlement

Unit 2: Russia in Revolution 1894-1924

Year 13:

Unit 3: The British Experience of Warfare c1790-1918

Unit 4: Coursework/Individual Study

Students complete an independently researched enquiry on historical interpretations.



Examination :

Two year linear course with three final examinations.

Coursework weighting 20% of final grade.

Religious Studies



Qualification:  A Level (Linear)

Exam Board:   Edexcel

Entry Criteria: GCSE Grade B in RE and Grade B/6 English

General/Course Objectives:

By choosing Religious Studies you will be opening yourself to the world of philosophical inquiry and will become involved in the ultimate questions of life such: ‘Can there be a true morality?’, ‘Is it possible for an all-powerful being to exist?’, ‘Why is there suffering and evil in the world?’ and ‘Are abortions acceptable?’

Looking into philosophical arguments will require you to question the nature of our modern world and the ethical practices that we see day to day. You will spend time investigating and evaluating how Buddhism started and the type of impact on it has on modern society. The course gives you the opportunity to develop your philosophical thinking skills and put scholarly arguments to the test. It is excellent preparation for university, as we encourage learning through discussion, engagement with primary texts and independent research.

What will you be studying?

Over the two years of study you will be looking at 3 topic areas in order to prepare for 3 examination papers;



Paper 1: Philosophy of Religion (2 hours) – Philosophical issues and questions; the nature of religious experience, the debates around the existence of a creator and questions about the problem of evil.

Paper 2: Religion and ethics (2 hours) – A study of ethical theories that attempt to explain how we should live in our world.

Paper 3: Study of Religion (2 hours) – An in depth study of Buddhist religious practice and identity; how does religion affect society?

During year 12 we will be introducing these ideas (if chosen, there is an AS examination which will be 3 papers each of 1 hour)

These themes are continued in more depth during year 13.

Travel & Tourism (BTEC)


Qualification: BTEC Level 3

Exam Board: Edexcel Pearson

Entry Criteria: 5 GCSE’s grade A*-C. GCSE Grade C in Leisure and Tourism or Geography is

preferred but not essential



General/Course Objectives:

The 60-credit BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma extends the specialist work-related focus of the BTEC Level 3 Certificate qualification and covers the key knowledge and practical skills required in the appropriate vocational sector. The BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma offers greater flexibility and a choice of emphasis through the optional units. It is broadly equivalent to one GCE A Level.

The travel and tourism sector continues to grow at a rapid pace, with the amount of travel undertaken by individuals for both leisure and business purposes continuing to increase. An expansion in the short-break market has led to a growth of regional airports in the UK and across Europe and a rise in the number of new hospitality enterprises including health spas and boutique hotels. This rapid expansion has led to huge demand for a more flexibly skilled workforce.

Specific skills gaps identified for Travel and Tourism include customer service skills, destination geography, knowledge of working with children, and business skills. These qualifications have been designed to provide an all-round introduction to the travel and tourism sector for those who wish to further their careers in one of its many connected industries, including retail, travel, visitor attractions, accommodation, transport and tour operations.

Units in this subject reflect the ever-increasing need for staff with diverse skills who are able to handle a wide variety of situations. They include:

Working as a Children’s Representative in Travel and Tourism - allows learners to gain an understanding of appropriate legislation and develop play-work skills to enable them to work with children abroad and in the UK.

Destination Geography units - focusing on UK, European and long-haul destinations. These units aim to develop knowledge of key destinations in these regions and the dynamics of the market for different destinations.

Learners have flexibility in selecting specialist units that reflect their own interests/career aspirations. The course is suitable for all and has been designed to build on learning and achievement from GCSE, and for those who may wish to explore a vocational route at Level 3.

IT Infrastructure Technician

Qualification: Level 3 Cambridge Technical Introductory Diploma in IT

Exam Board: OCR

Entry Criteria: GCSE Grade C/5 or above in Maths and English

General/Course Objectives:

Typical job roles within this pathway include; IT Technical Support, Database Administrator, Field Technician or Network Technician. Learners will take the designated mandatory unit for this pathway - Computer networks. This unit will give learners the practical ability to plan, implement and maintain computer networks building the key skills, knowledge and understanding relevant to job roles in this field. It’s essential that you appreciate how the knowledge, understanding and skills you acquire are applied in the workplace. To this end, you will find IT professionals getting involved helping to deliver some of your units.




Units:

Unit 1, Fundamentals of IT: Information learnt in this unit will provide a solid foundation in the fundamentals of hardware, networks, software, the ethical use of computers and how business uses IT. (25% of A-level, assessed through written exam).
Unit 2, Global Information: The purpose of this unit is to demonstrate the uses of information in the public domain, globally, in the cloud and across the internet, by individuals and organisations. (25% of A-level, assessed through written exam).
Unit 4, Computer Networks: The emphasis of this unit is to give you the practical ability to plan, implement and maintain computer networks. (16.6% of A-level, assessed by coursework).

Unit 18, Hardware: You will develop the skills needed to recommend appropriate hardware systems for various purposes. Using the skills developed you will build/upgrade a full computer system with a view to testing and considering preventive maintenance procedures. (16.6% of A-level, assessed by coursework).

Unit 20, IT technical support: IT support technicians require the skills, knowledge and understanding to troubleshoot a wide variety of hardware and software issues and provide advice and guidance to different stakeholders. (16.6% of A-level, assessed by coursework).

Computer Science



Qualification: A Level (Linear)

Exam Board: AQA/OCR

Entry Criteria: GCSE Grade B/6 or above in Maths and Science

General/Course Objectives:

The emphasis is on learning computational thinking. Computational thinking is a kind of reasoning used by both humans and machines. Thinking computationally is an important life skill. Thinking computationally means using abstraction and decomposition. The study of computation is about what can be computed and how to compute it. Computer Science involves questions that have the potential to change how we view the world.



This is a linear course with terminal exams at the end of Year 13


  • Computer Systems allows candidates to demonstrate their knowledge of the fundamental principles of the subject, focusing on components of a computer, types of software, how data is exchanged between systems and how data is represented in different structures and algorithms. This is assessed through a 2.5hr exam

(40% of A-level).

  • Algorithms and Programming focuses on how computers are used to solve problems through programming and the use of algorithms to describe problems. This is assessed through a 2.5hr exam that will include providing a programming solution

(40% of A-level).

  • Programming project allows students to select their own user-driven problem of an appropriate size and complexity to solve. Students will need to analyse the problem, design a solution, implement the solution and give a thorough evaluation. This is assessed internally through coursework submission

(20% of A-level).

Electronics



Qualification: A Level (Linear)

Exam Board: WJEC

Entry Criteria: Both criteria i) and ii) below must be met
i) GCSE Grade B/6 or above in Maths
ii) GCSE Grade B/6 in Core Science and Additional Science OR if doing Triple Award Science then Grade B/6 or above in Physics and in either Chemistry or Biology.


General/Course Objectives:
The goal of this science course is to teach students how to create their own electronic circuits from scratch. Candidates will learn the skills on how to select suitable components and arrange them using a prototyping board to create a functional circuit for a desired requirement. Microcontrollers play a large part in the course and students will regularly use Arduinos/PICs to create their own chips with custom functionality. Whilst the latter involves a limited ability to program, no prior knowledge in this area is required.

The knowledge and skills acquired through the study of Electronics form a sound base, not only for taking the subject further at University, but also for employment in the scientific, technological and engineering professions. In addition, by studying this subject, students will encounter techniques and disciplines of value in many other subject areas including Physics, Mathematics and Computer Science.



This is a linear course with terminal exams at the end of Year 13


  • Principles of Electronics (40% - Exam)
    This theory module covers the following topics: Semiconductor Components, Logic Systems, Operation Amplifiers, Signal Conversion, AC Circuits and Passive Filters, Communication Systems, Wireless Transmission & Instrumentation Systems.


  • Application of Electronics (40% - Exam)
    This theory module covers the following topics: Timing Circuits, Sequential Logic Systems, Microcontrollers, Digital Communications, Optical Communications, Mains Power Supply Systems, High Power Switching Systems & Audio Systems.


  • Extended system design and realization task (20% - Coursework/NEA)

    • Task1: a design and program task to create a microcontroller system programed in assembler language to solve an identified problem, need or opportunity.

    • Task 2: a substantial integrated design and realisation task to create an electronic system to solve an identified problem, need or opportunity.

French
Qualification: A Level (Linear)

Exam Board: AQA

Entry Criteria: GCSE French Grade B or higher. Must have sat higher tier GCSE Listening and Reading papers

General/Course Objectives:

  • develop an interest in, and enthusiasm for language learning

  • develop understanding of the language in a variety of contexts and genres

  • communicate confidently, clearly and effectively in the language for a range of purposes

  • develop awareness and understanding of the contemporary society, cultural background and heritage of countries or communities where the language is spoken


Paper 1: Listening, Reading and Writing (2 hours 30 minutes written exam, 50% of A Level marks)
You will answer a range of questions based on spoken passages from a range of contexts and sources. You will then read and respond to a variety of texts written for different purposes, drawn from a range of authentic sources. You will translate a passage into English and one into Spanish (a minimum of 100 words each). The paper will cover the following areas:

  • Aspects of French-speaking society: current trends

  • Aspects of French-speaking society: current issues

  • Artistic culture in the French-speaking world

  • Aspects of political life in the French-speaking world

  • Grammar


Paper 2: Writing (2 hour written exam, 20% of A level marks)

You will answer two essay questions during this exam, one with reference to the film you’ve studied and one with reference to the novel / text you’ve studied. All questions will require a critical appreciation of the concepts and issues covered in the work and a critical and analytical response to features such as the form and the technique of presentation, as appropriate to the work studied (e.g. the effect of narrative voice in a prose text or camera work in a film). You should aim to write approximately 300 words per essay in the target language.



Paper 3: Speaking (30% of A Level)- Exam lasts approx. 22 minutes (including preparation time)

You will be assessed on an Individual research project and one of four sub-themes i.e. Aspects of French-speaking society: current trends, Aspects of French-speaking society: current issues, Artistic culture in the French-speaking world, Aspects of political life in the French-speaking world. You will be required to discuss a topic based on a stimulus card (5-6 minutes) and to do a presentation (2 minutes) and discussion (9-10 minutes) of your individual research project.

German
Qualification: A Level (Linear)

Exam Board: AQA

Entry Criteria: GCSE German Grade B or higher. Must have sat higher tier GCSE Listening

and Reading papers


General/Course Objectives:

  • develop an interest in, and enthusiasm for language learning

  • develop understanding of the language in a variety of contexts and genres

  • communicate confidently, clearly and effectively in the language for a range of purposes

  • develop awareness and understanding of the contemporary society, cultural background and heritage of countries or communities where the language is spoken


Paper 1: Listening, Reading and Writing (2 hours 30 minutes written exam, 50% of A Level marks)
You will answer a range of questions based on spoken passages from a range of contexts and sources. You will then read and respond to a variety of texts written for different purposes, drawn from a range of authentic sources. You will translate a passage into English and one into Spanish (a minimum of 100 words each). The paper will cover the following areas:

  • Aspects of German-speaking society

  • Artistic culture in the German-speaking world

  • Multiculturalism in German-speaking society

  • Aspects of political life in German-speaking society

  • Grammar


Paper 2: Writing (2 hour written exam, 20% of A level marks)

You will answer two essay questions during this exam, one with reference to the film you’ve studied and one with reference to the novel / text you’ve studied. All questions will require a critical appreciation of the concepts and issues covered in the work and a critical and analytical response to features such as the form and the technique of presentation, as appropriate to the work studied (e.g. the effect of narrative voice in a prose text or camera work in a film). You should aim to write approximately 300 words per essay in the target language.



Paper 3: Speaking (30% of A Level) - Exam lasts approx. 22 minutes (including preparation time)

You will be assessed on an Individual research project and one of four sub-themes i.e. Aspects of German-speaking society or Artistic culture in the German-speaking world or Multiculturalism in German-speaking society or Aspects of political life in German-speaking society. You will be required to discuss a topic based on a stimulus card (5-6 minutes) and to do a presentation (2 minutes) and discussion (9-10 minutes) of your individual research project.

Spanish
Qualification: A Level (Linear)

Exam Board: AQA

Entry Criteria: GCSE Spanish Grade B or higher. Must have sat higher tier GCSE Listening and Reading papers

General/Course Objectives:


  • develop an interest in, and enthusiasm for language learning

  • develop understanding of the language in a variety of contexts and genres

  • communicate confidently, clearly and effectively in the language for a range of purposes

  • develop awareness and understanding of the contemporary society, cultural background and heritage of countries or communities where the language is spoken


Paper 1: Listening, Reading and Writing (2 hours 30 minutes written exam, 50% of A Level marks)
You will answer a range of questions based on spoken passages from a range of contexts and sources. You will then read and respond to a variety of texts written for different purposes, drawn from a range of authentic sources. You will translate a passage into English and one into Spanish (a minimum of 100 words each). The paper will cover the following areas:


  • Aspects of Hispanic society

  • Artistic culture in the Hispanic world

  • Multiculturalism in Hispanic society

  • Aspects of political life in Hispanic society

  • Grammar


Paper 2: Writing (2 hour written exam, 20% of A level marks)

You will answer two essay questions during this exam, one with reference to the film you’ve studied and one with reference to the novel / text you’ve studied. All questions will require a critical appreciation of the concepts and issues covered in the work and a critical and analytical response to features such as the form and the technique of presentation, as appropriate to the work studied (e.g. the effect of narrative voice in a prose text or camera work in a film). You should aim to write approximately 300 words per essay in the target language.

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