5156 Cyber ap literature and Composition



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5156 Cyber AP Literature and Composition –

Mrs. Lehman

Welcome to your Edgenuity English class. My name is Mrs. Lehman, and I am responsible for grading your work and assisting you through this course. Below you will find important information relating to your course. It is very important that you email me at any time this year if you have a problem, question, or concern. Your communication with me is very important! I wish you much success for this class and throughout your senior year.

Mrs. Lehman – Cyber teacher of record for cyber English courses including:


  • English 9 and 10 and Honors English 9 and 10

  • English 11 and Honors English 11/American Literature

  • Speech Parts I and II

  • Creative Writing Parts I and II

  • Gothic Literature

  • Modern Humanities/GP and Honors British Literature/GP

  • AP Language and Composition (11) and AP Literature and Composition/GP (12)

  • All Credit Recovery English

My workstation is on the 2nd floor in the cyber room across from the library.

Please contact me through Edgenuity email or regular email at lehmanal@svsd.net. Phone: 724-452-6041 ext. 1024.



Your Edgenuity course consists of several key components that factor into your grade.

  • Starting the Course

You are responsible for beginning work in this course on August 1st. You must have 20% of the 1st nine weeks of the course completed by the first day of school. If you are not “on track” by the start of school and when the progress reports are due, you will be given your actual grade and the comment of “incomplete assignments.” You will also be exited from the course and rescheduled into another available English course.

Course Materials

You should pick up your required text in the SHS Guidance office upon the request of the teacher. (This is typically at the end of the previous school year).



Required Text:

Arp, Thomas R. and Greg Johnson. Perrine’s Literature: Structure, Sound and Sense. Boston, 9th Ed., MA: Heinle &



Heinle, 2002.

  • Journal and Homework:

Journal entries will be read and graded. Please answer all parts of the question. If a green checkmark is given for completion and no comment is listed in the teacher comment section, your score will be recorded as a 100%. If you do not earn a 100% on your journal entry, a comment will be given to explain your grade.

Practice/Homework and Quizzes and tests will be scored by the Edgenuity program. Please let me know if you find a problem with the scoring or if you need something reset. Your failure to answer all of the short answer homework questions will result in an automatic “0” grade for that assignment. Answers such as “I don’t know” or “I don’t feel like answering this” are not acceptable for credit.

  • Grading Weights: These are assigned according to College Board guidelines - Assignments = 20, Essays = 40, Tests = 30, Additional = 10. These are subject to change depending on the nine week assignments.

  • Quizzes:

Quizzes will be scored by the Edgenuity program. Please let me know if you find a problem with the scoring or if you need something reset.

  • Tests:

Tests will be scored by the Edgenuity program. Please let me know if you find a problem with the scoring or if you need something reset.

  • Collaboration Corner is a place where students and teachers can participate in group discussions directly through the Web Administrator and the Virtual Classroom. In the AP level classes, there are additional reading prompts that will be posted in the Collaboration Corner. You are expected to check there when you reach the Collaboration Corner assignments within the course.

You will also receive email attachments of sample assignments to help you with your Graduation Project assignments, so be sure to check your Edgenuity email daily. All Graduation Project assignments will be entered separately in the SV Gradebook.

  • Cumulative Exams: They will be weighted as 10% of your final course grade - All grades will go into the SV Gradebook at the end of the nine weeks.

EDGENUITY provides you with a course calendar which you should use to help stay on track in order to finish by your target date. Please utilize the suggested timeframes in this calendar. To be successful in the class, you must put in the required hours for working. If you do not log adequate work time, you will be referred for truancy.

How does the Grading System in Edgenuity work?

Overall Grade: This is the grade you have acquired thus far in the course based on all activities and assessments you have completed.

Actual Grade: Represents the overall grade in relation to the percentage of coursework completed vs. the percentage of coursework that should have been completed. This grade is lower than the Overall Grade if you are behind in the course and will be the same as the Overall Grade if you are on-time or ahead of schedule in the coursework.

Relative Grade: Represents the grade you would receive if you stopped working in that course today and completed no more activities or assessments.

If you ever have a question or concern, please be sure to contact me via email or make a visit to the cyber workroom. Communication is the key to success in any online course, and I will help in any way I can as long as you communicate your needs to me. I am also including the course syllabus provided by Edgenuity.

I look forward to a productive and successful year! Good luck!

EDGENUITY ADVANCED PLACEMENT - English Literature and Composition - Course Overview

Literature and Composition is designed to be a college/university-level course. This course equips students to critically analyze all forms of literature in order to comment insightfully about an author or genre’s use of style or literary device. Students will also interpret meaning based on form; examine the trademark characteristics of literary genres and periods; and critique literary works through expository, analytical, and argumentative essays. As students consider styles and devices, they will apply them to their creative writing. In addition to exposing students to college-level English coursework, this course prepares them for the AP exam.

As the student: What are students going to do in this course? This is a legitimate question. In fact, there are several essential questions that will guide students’ discovery and inquiry of literature throughout the course.

 How does literature simultaneously provide a vicarious experience while helping to understand one self?

 How does literature express universal themes?

 How does a close reading of literature serve as an avenue to enjoying and appreciating literature?

These questions may seem lofty and idealistic, but students will be surprised to see the ways in which they connect to their everyday activities. Upon the completion of this course, students will be able to approach a piece of literature (prose, poem, play, etc.)—moving beyond initial and purely emotional reactions—and respond to it critically both orally and in writing. Instead of merely identifying literary and stylistic devices, students will use them to illuminate their insights. These ideas help to form the foundation of the course’s goals:

 To read carefully and analyze imaginative literature.

 To identify the style of a selection and make connections between meaning and form.

 To examine a variety of works from different genres and periods

 To learn and understand a selected work very well.

 To write, focusing on critical analysis of literature including expository, analytical, and argumentative essays as well as creative writing, to sharpen understanding a text’s accomplishments and to deepen appreciation of literary artistry.



Reading Assignments

 The selections in this course ask students to consider the manner in which literature paradoxically allows readers to experience things they would otherwise never know while simultaneously exploring individual concepts of self and identity. By representing authors from various cultures over hundreds of years, the course allows students to take self-directed steps toward their own understanding of the human experience.

The course textbook is Perrine’s Structure, Sound, and Sense (9th ed.). Additional course materials are provided by Education 2020 in the virtual environment. The assignments are labeled accordingly in the course outline; several lectures, vocabulary activities, online content, quizzes, and homework assignments exist in the Edgenuity virtual format.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT

English Literature and Composition

Reading Journals

 Students will provide personal responses in their online reading journals. The goals of the journals are to provide students with opportunities to write about their readings on their own terms and to explore what they think about the texts in an informal setting. The reading journal is an avenue by which students may communicate with instructors with questions, reflections, or insights about the readings or related materials. Students may revisit entries in the journal to revise or expand upon previous statements.



Timed Writings

 Students will complete timed writing assignments in forty minutes after no more than ten minutes of planning. Students may select one of the timed essays to undergo peer/instructor review before submission. It is understood that lower order concerns will not be a major element in the scoring of the essays due to the fact that all timed essays are inherently first drafts.



Essays

 All essays will be submitted as part of the writing process in which students take part in prewriting of their choice, conferences, drafting, revision, submission, and rewriting. In each of the stages, instructors and students will address higher-order concerns and lower-order concerns according to the hierarchical importance.

Higher-Order Concerns – focus, audience, purpose, organization, development, style, generalizations, specifics, etc.

Lower-Order Concerns – sentence structure, word choice, punctuation, spelling

 Essays will be scored according to the following scoring guide:

AP Score % or points Letter Content

9 - 97–100 / 50–49 - A

Sophisticated

8 - 93–96 / 48–47 - A

Sophisticated

7 - 83–92 / 46–45 - B

Specific


6 - 85–88 / 44–43 - B

Specific


5 - 81–84 / 42–41 - C

Sufficient

4 - 77–80 / 40–39 - C

Sufficient

3 - 74–76 / 38–37 - D

Insufficient

2 - 70–73 / 36–35 - D

Insufficient

1 - 0–69 - F

Absent


Writing Log

 To show the progress, evolution, and development of the students’ writing during the course, students will keep a writing log binder in which all of their major writings and selections of their own choosing are kept. This log will also include important reflections from each student on her or his writings.



Unit One: Elements of Fiction and Independent Research

Content/Activities

Learning Strategies

Assessments

Instructional Materials

1. Students will read, analyze, and respond to a variety of selections from British, American, and world literature.

2. Students will research and write for purposes of informing, persuading, and describing.

3. Students will demonstrate effective research and information management strategies catering to both specific assignments and their own interests.

1. Create a multi-genre independent research project that expands on an aspect of a selection from Perrine’s or an online text (may be in the form of an I-Search or persuasive research project).

2. Analyze the elements of fiction (plot/structure, characterization, theme, point of view, symbol, allegory, and irony) in short selections from Perrine’s and online texts.

3. Research and read literary criticism for selected stories.

4. Keep a reading double-entry journal for the unit’s readings.

5. Create an original writing that mimics the style and voice of a selected author from the unit.

6. Write a timed essay that evaluates two unfamiliar selections based on criteria for literary and commercial fiction.

1. Independent research project presentation and writing component

2. Online check for understanding reading quizzes

3. Informal check for comprehension and understanding

4. Double-entry reading journal

5. Literary analysis essay

6. Unit exam that includes objective questions, short answer responses, and an essay



Texts:

Perrine’s Structure, Sound, and Sense (9th edition)

Edgenuity Online Readings

Selections:

Commercial vs. Literary Fiction

―The Most Dangerous Game‖

―Hunters in the Snow‖

Plot and Structure

―The Destructors‖

Characterization

―Miss Brill‖

―The Mark of the Beast‖

Theme

―Once Upon a Time‖



―The Duchess and the Jeweller‖

―Araby‖


Point of View

―Hills Like White Elephants‖

―The Lottery‖

Symbol and Allegory

―Interpreter of Maladies‖

―Kubla Khan‖

Irony

―Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been‖



Unit Two: The Nature of the Hero and the Independent Research Project

Content/Activities

Learning Strategies

Assessments

Instructional Materials

1. Students will read, analyze, and respond to a variety of selections from British, American, and world literature.

2. Students will research and write for purposes of informing, persuading, and describing.

3. Students will write about connections between art and literature in different time periods.

4. Students will demonstrate effective research and information management strategies catering to both specific assignments and their own interests.

1. Create an independent research project that expands on an aspect of a reading from this unit (may be in the form of an I-Search or persuasive research project).

2. Read, analyze, and discuss Beowulf and The Iliad in relation to elements of fiction and heroic elements.

3. Research and read literary criticism for the novel.

4. Write a timed essay that evaluates The Iliad based on criteria for literary and commercial fiction.

1. Independent research project writing component

2. Reading journal, short responses, and reading quizzes

3. Informal check for comprehension and understanding

4. Unit exam that includes objective questions, short-answer responses, and a timed essay

Texts:


Perrine’s Structure, Sound, and Sense (9th edition)

Edgenuity Online Readings

Selections:

Beowulf


The Iliad

Test Preparation:

AP Practice Exams

Unit Three: The Poetic Elements

Content/Activities

Learning Strategies

Assessments

Instructional Materials

1. Students will read, analyze, and respond to a variety of selections from British, American, and world literature.

2. Students will research and write for purposes of informing, persuading, and describing.

3. Students will demonstrate effective research and information management strategies catering to both specific assignments and their own interests.

4. Students will analyze and respond to works of art, music, architecture, and philosophy.

1. Read, analyze, and comment on selections from Don Quixote and Gulliver’s Travels in relation to elements of fiction and their historical contexts.

2. Research and read literary criticism for the selections.

3. Analyze the elements of poetry (denotation, connotation, imagery, simile, metaphor, personification, allegory, paradox, irony, allusion, rhythm, meter, and other poetry elements).

4. Create original poems that incorporate a selection of poetic elements and a theme of the student’s choice.

1. Independent research project writing component

2. Reading journal, short responses, and reading quizzes

3. Poetry explication essay

4. Unit exam that includes objective questions, short answer responses, and a timed essay

Texts:

Perrine’s Structure, Sound, and Sense (9th edition)



Edgenuity Online Readings

Selections:

selections from Don Quixote

selections from Gulliver’s Travels

Denotation/Connotation

―The Seafarer‖

―There is no Frigate Like a Book‖

―Naming of Parts‖

Imagery

―The Wife’s Lament‖



―Spring‖

―Living in Sin‖

―Those Winter Sundays‖

―The Destruction of Sennacherib‖

Simile, Metaphor, Personification

―The Passionate Shepherd to His Love’

Sonnet 18

Sonnet 73

―I taste a liquor never brewed‖

―Toads‖


―Ghost of a Chance‖

―Digging‖

Symbol and Allegory

―The World Is Too Much with Us‖

―The Rime of the Ancient Mariner‖

―Fire and Ice‖

―Ulysses‖

―She Walks in Beauty‖

Paradox, Irony, Over/Understatement

―Ode to the West Wind‖

―Ode to a Grecian Urn‖

―Sorting Laundry‖

―The History Teacher‖

Allusion


―The Second Coming‖

―Yet Do I Marvel‖

―Ozymandias‖

―Leda and the Swan‖

Rhythm/Meter

―Had I the Choice‖

―The Aim Was Song‖

―Elegy Written in a Country Courtyard‖

Unit Four: Macbeth and Self-Discovery

Content/Activities

Learning Strategies

Assessments

Instructional Materials

1. Students will read, analyze, and respond to a variety of selections from British, American, and world literature.

2. Students will research and write for purposes of informing, persuading, and describing.

3. Students will demonstrate effective research and information management strategies catering to both specific assignments and their own interests.

1. Read, analyze, and comment on Macbeth in relation to elements of fiction and the theme of self-discovery.

2. Read, analyze, and comment on selections from world literature that embody the theme of self-discovery.

3. Evaluate a work in the form of a critical review based on its artistry and quality.

1. Macbeth essay

2. Reading journal, short responses, and reading quizzes

3. Critical review

4. Unit exam that includes objective questions and short-answer response

5. Self-discovery essay

Texts:

Perrine’s Structure, Sound, and Sense (9th edition)



Edgenuity Online Readings

Selections:

Macbeth

selections from Ramayana



The Metamorphosis

―A Happy Excursion‖

Life Is a Dream

Unit One: Elements of Fiction and Independent Research

1. Commercial vs. Literary Fiction

a. Read: ―Reading the Story‖ Perrine’s

i. Reading Journal: In your Reading Journal, answer three of the five questions from ―Reviewing Chapter One‖ regarding literary and commercial fiction.

b. Read: ―The Most Dangerous Game‖ (Connell) Perrine’s

c. Read: ―Hunters in the Snow‖ (Wolff) Perrine’s

d. Essay: Connell’s ―The Most Dangerous Game‖ and Wolff’s ―Hunters in the Snow‖ are stories with some similarities in terms of central action. In a comparative essay, determine which is the literary and which is the commercial story.

2. Plot and Structure

a. Read: ―Plot and Structure‖ Perrine’s

i. Reading Journal: In your Reading Journal, answer three of the six questions from ―Reviewing Chapter Two‖ regarding plot, structure, and artistic unity.

b. Read: ―The Destructors‖ (Greene) Perrine’s

i. Online Discussion Thread: Answer the following in a well-developed response using specific references from the text and pose two questions to extend the discussion: What good qualities do the delinquents in this story have? Do they differ as a group from other youth gangs you have read or known about? If so, account for the differences.

3. Characterization

a. Read: ―Characterization‖ Perrine’s

i. Reading Journal: In your reading journal, reference films or other readings to provide examples of different types of characters: flat, round, dynamic, static. Be sure to explain the characteristics of each.

b. Read: ―The Mark of the Beast‖ (Kipling) Edgenuity

i. Prereading Lecture

ii. Vocabulary

iii. Homework/Practice Answers

iv. Quiz Answers

c. Read: ―Everyday Use‖ (Walker) Perrine’s

d. Read: ―Miss Brill‖ (Mansfield) Perrine’s

e. Essay: Considering the three criteria that are necessary for developing a convincing character, write an essay in which you determine whether one of the following characters meets these criteria: Miss Brill in ―Miss Brill‖; Mother in ―Everyday Use‖; Fleete in ―The Mark of the Beast.‖

4. Theme

a. Read: ―Theme‖ Perrine’s

i. Reading Journal: In your Reading Journal, address these two issues: 1) Distinguish between the theme of a story and the central purpose of a story. 2) Differentiate between the typical themes of commercial vs. literary stories.

b. Read: ―Once Upon a Time‖ (Gordimer) Perrine’s

c. Read: ―The Duchess and the Jeweller‖ (Woolf) Edgenuity

i. Prereading Lecture

ii. Vocabulary

iii. Postreading Lecture

iv. Homework/Practice Answers

d. Read: ―Araby‖ (Joyce) Edgenuity

i. Prereading Lecture

ii. Homework/Practice Answers

e. Critical Review: Research two scholarly reviews of one of the stories for this section. Create a critical review of the story considering its artistry and quality while referencing your critical sources.

5. Point of View

a. Read: ―Point of View‖ Perrine’s

i. Reading Journal: Graphic Organizer – Select the graphic organizer of your choice (double-entry, Venn, etc.) to demonstrate both the virtues and limitations of the following points of view: omniscient, first-person, third-person limited.

b. Read: ―The Lottery‖ (Jackson) Perrine’s

c. Read: ―Hills Like White Elephants‖ (Hemmingway) Perrine’s

d. Essay: Both ―The Lottery‖ and ―Hills Like White Elephants‖ reflect values of a particular time period or group of people. Considering literary elements like theme and point of view, describe how one of the stories reflects the main characters’ social, historical, and/or cultural values.

6. Symbol and Allegory

a. Read: ―Symbol, Allegory, and Fantasy‖ Perrine’s

b. Read: ―Interpreter of Maladies‖ (Lahiri) Perrine’s

c. Read: ―Kubla Khan‖ (Coleridge) Edgenuity

i. Prereading Lecture

ii. Vocabulary

iii. Homework/Practice Answers

d. Reading Journal: Briefly compare the use of symbolism in any two of the stories/poems from this section, clarifying how each achieves compression through the use of symbols.

7. Irony


a. Read: ―Irony‖ Perrine’s

b. Read: ―Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?‖ (Oates) Perrine’s

c. Reading Journal: Respond to one of the following prompts referencing ―Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been‖ or any other story in this unit: 1) Select a work and describe the particular types of irony found in the story. 2) Consider a film or reading outside this course and explain why sentimentality is an undesirable trait in that work.

8. Unit Essay: This unit essay consists of two parts: 1) Select an author that you enjoyed in this unit and write a 500–700 word narrative mimicking that author’s style considering sentence structure, tone, voice, and diction. 2) Explain your narrative and style and explain how you developed the style in terms of sentence structure, patterns, tone, voice, and diction.



Unit Two: Nature of the Hero and the Independent Research Project

1. Introduction: The Hero in Early English Literature

a. Lecture: Timeline – Edgenuity

i. Timeline Lecture

ii. Online Content

b. Lecture: Historical Period – Edgenuity

i. Historical Lecture

ii. Online Content

2. Heroes and Society – Edgenuity

a. Information Lecture

b. Journal: Heroes and Society – After reading about both history’s heroes as well as those of today and possibly tomorrow, what differences do you note between then and now? What circumstances must be present for a hero to be called such? Lastly, how do media affect, for better or for worse, a society’s choice of hero?

i. Students should respond to all questions. Responses should contain complete sentences and should address the specific question. Suggested responses may include, but are not limited to, the following: 1) Heroes are often born out of a struggle society faces or when a society faces change. 2) Students should mention differences between ancient heroes, like Beowulf, and modern heroes. These differences may include an explanation that ancient heroes were typically warriors, whereas today’s heroes affect society without violence (e.g., Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King, Jr., JFK, Princess Diana). 3) Students should also present an argument on how media affect those labeled heroes. 4) Students should state that they either agree or disagree with that statement and offer a brief reason as to why they agree or disagree. 5) Students should state their own opinion on this question. They should also include specific reasons and/or examples for their opinion.

c. Epic: From Beowulf, Part I

i. Reading Lecture

ii. Vocabulary

iii. Reading Lecture

d. Epic: From Beowulf, Part II

i. Reading Lecture

ii. Vocabulary

iii. Homework/Practice Answers

iv. Reading Journal: The story is about Beowulf as a hero instead of a king. What is the difference?

e. Epic: From Beowulf, Part III

i. Reading Lecture

ii. Vocabulary

iii. Reading Lecture

iv. Homework/Practice Answers

v. Reading Journal: Consider the female characters in Beowulf. What do they do? How do they do it? Do they, as women, offer different perspectives of the heroic world compared to the view offered by Beowulf?

f. Epic: From Book 22: ―The Death of Hector‖

i. Prereading Lecture

ii. Vocabulary

iii. Reading Lecture

iv. Postreading Lecture

v. Homework/Practice Lecture

vi. Timed Writing (45 minutes): Homer may have known little about the characteristics of contemporary commercial fiction. How does the story The Iliad embody elements of literary or commercial fiction despite its age?

3. Independent Research Project

a. Students will complete a research paper project in the form of a critical research project or an I-Search. In both assignments, students will utilize the stages and parts of the writing process: prewriting, annotation, drafting, editing, and publishing. Both essays require two drafts: the first to address higher-order concerns and the second to address lower-order concerns.

i. I-Search: Students will select any topic or subject with which they feel a personal connection or about which they would like to know more. The paper will include the following parts: What I Already Know, What I Want to Find Out, The Search, What I Learned, and Works Cited.

ii. Critical Research Project: Students will research critical, scholarly sources regarding one of the reading selections in this unit. After conducting research, students will develop an argumentative analysis of the work.



Unit Three: The Poetic Elements

1. Novel: From Don Quixote (Cervantes) Edgenuity

a. Prereading Lecture

b. Vocabulary

c. From Don Quixote (Cervantes)

d. Homework/Practice Answers

2. Novel: From Gulliver’s Travels, Part I (Swift) Edgenuity

a. Prereading Lecture

b. Vocabulary

c. From Gulliver’s Travels

3. Novel: From Gulliver’s Travels, Part II (Swift) Edgenuity

a. Prereading Lecture

b. Vocabulary

c. From Gulliver’s Travels, Part II

d. Homework/Practice Answers

4. Essay: Literature Analysis – Select a passage of at least 500 words from either Don Quixote or Gulliver’s Travels and identify two different but complimentary tones in the passage. Your essay will be an interpretive analysis of the text explaining how the tone is established through figurative language (e.g., diction, imagery, details, language, symbolism, etc.).

a. This essay will require at least two drafts: the first to address higher-order concerns and the second to address lower-order concerns.

5. Poetic Elements: Denotation and Connotation

a. Read: ―Denotation and Connotation‖ Perrine’s

b. Read: ―There is no Frigate like a Book‖ (Dickinson) Perrine’s

c. Read: ―Naming of Parts‖ (Reed) Perrine’s

d. Read: ―Desert Places‖ (Frost) Perrine’s

e. Read: ―The Seafarer‖ (Pound) Edgenuity

i. Reading Lecture

ii. Vocabulary

iii. Homework/Practice Answers

f. Reading Journal: Consider the denotative meaning(s) of one of the titles from this section of reading. Reread the poem carefully and explain the multiple connotations that attach to the title phrase as the poem progresses.

6. Poetic Elements: Imagery

a. Read: ―Imagery‖ Perrine’s

b. Reading Journal: Identify an image that is a part of your everyday life and describe how it conveys emotion, suggests ideas, and engages the senses.

c. Read: ―The Wife’s Lament‖ Edgenuity

i. Reading Lecture

ii. Vocabulary

iii. Homework/Practice Answers

d. Read: ―Spring‖ (Hopkins) Perrine’s

e. Read: ―Living in Sin‖ (Rich) Perrine’s

f. Read: ―Those Winter Sundays‖ (Hayden) Perrine’s

g. Read: ―The Destruction of Sennacherib‖ (Byron) Perrine’s

h. Dialectical Journal: Keep a double-entry journal while reading the poems in the ―Imagery‖ section. On the left side, list the images you see in the poems, and on the right side, explain how each image conveys emotion, suggests ideas, and engages the senses.

7. Poetic Elements: Simile, Metaphor, and Personification

a. Read: ―Figurative Language I: Simile, Metaphor, Personification, Apostrophe, Metonymy‖ Perrine’s

b. Reading Journal: Define simile, metaphor, and personification, and based on your personal preference, rank them in the order that they appeal to you emotionally.

c. Read: ―The Passionate Shepherd to His Love‖ (Marlowe) Edgenuity

i. Prereading Lecture

ii. Vocabulary

iii. Postreading Lecture

iv. Homework/Practice Answers

d. Read: Sonnet 18 (Petrarch) Edgenuity

i. Prereading Lecture

ii. Quiz


e. Read: Sonnet 73 (Petrarch) Edgenuity

i. Prereading Lecture

ii. Homework/Practice Answers

f. Read: ―I taste a liquor never brewed‖ (Dickinson) Perrine’s

g. Read: ―Toads‖ (Larkin) Perrine’s

h. Read: ―Ghost of a Chance‖ (Rich) Perrine’s

i. Read: ―Digging‖ (Heaney) Perrine’s

j. Read: ―Introduction to Poetry‖ (Collins) Perrine’s

k. Reading Journal: Use the Poetry 180 website (http://www.loc.gov/poetry/180/) and select a poem with a metaphor that plays a central role in the poem. Describe the objects being compared and explain how the use of figurative language is more effective than regular prose.

8. Poetic Elements: Symbol and Allegory

a. Read: ―Figurative Language 2: Symbol, Allegory‖ Perrine’s

b. Reading Journal: What is the difference between symbol and allegory? Why do you think so few contemporary writers use allegory?

c. Read: ―The World Is Too Much with Us‖ (Wordsworth) Edgenuity

i. Prereading Lecture

ii. Vocabulary

iii. Homework/Practice Answers

d. Read: ―The Rime of the Ancient Mariner‖ (Coleridge) Edgenuity

i. Prereading Lecture

ii. Vocabulary

iii. Homework/Practice Answers

e. Read: ―Fire and Ice‖ (Frost) Perrine’s

f. Read: ―Ulysses‖ (Tennyson) Perrine’s

g. Read: ―She Walks in Beauty‖ (Byron) Perrine’s

h. Reading Journal: Select a film or another work of literature and describe a character that stands for something other than herself or himself. List/describe the elements of the work that you think lead to your interpretation of the symbol.

9. Poetic Elements: Paradox, Overstatement, Understatement, Irony

a. Read: ―Figurative Language 3: Paradox, Overstatement, Understatement, and Irony‖ Perrine’s

b. Reading Journal: In the poems that follow in this section, find examples of the three forms of irony. For each example, explain the role that the irony plays in adding to the meaning as a whole.

c. Read: ―Ode to the West Wind‖ (Shelley) Edgenuity

i. Prereading Lecture

ii. Vocabulary

iii. Homework/Practice Answers

d. Read: ―Ode on a Grecian Urn‖ (Keats) Edgenuity

i. Prereading Lecture

ii. Vocabulary

iii. Homework/Practice Answers

e. Read: ―Sorting Laundry‖ (Ritchie) Perrine’s

f. Read: ―The History Teacher‖ (Collins) Perrine’s

g. Read: ―The Unknown Citizen‖ (Auden) Perrine’s

10. Poetic Elements: Allusion

a. Read: ―Allusion‖ Perrine’s

b. Read: ―The Second Coming‖ (Yeats) Edgenuity

i. Prereading Lecture

ii. Vocabulary

iii. Homework/Practice Answers

iv. Quiz

c. Read: ―Yet Do I Marvel‖ (Cullen) Perrine’s

d. Read: ―Ozymandias‖ (Shelley) Perrine’s

e. Read: ―Leda and the Swan‖ (Yeats) Perrine’s

f. Reading Journal: Select from this section’s selection of poems the allusion that you felt added most to the meaning of the poem. In your response, be sure to explain the allusion and the effect it has on the poem.

11. Poetic Elements: Rhythm and Meter

a. Read: ―Rhythm and Meter‖ Perrine’s

b. Reading Journal: Using the following poems, identify the rhythm of each poem using the appropriate adjectives. Create scansion for six lines in any two poems of your choice.

c. Read: ―Had I the Choice‖ (Whitman) Perrine’s

d. Read: ―The Aim Was Song‖ (Frost) Perrine’s

e. Read: ―Elegy Written in a Country Courtyard‖ (Gray) Perrine’s

f. Read: ―Old Ladies’ Home‖ (Plath) Perrine’s

12. Unit Essay: Explication – Select a poem from ―Chapter 15: Evaluating Poetry‖ (Perrine’s) and complete an explication in which you create an in-depth and sophisticated analysis of the poem. Address at least four poetic elements in your analysis and be sure to move beyond mere identification. The focus of the explication will draw connections between the poetic elements and the meaning of the work as a whole.

Unit Four: Macbeth and Self-Discovery

1. Introduction Lesson: William Shakespeare and Renaissance Theater

a. Lecture: Renaissance Theater

i. Introduction Lecture

ii. Online Content

b. Lecture: William Shakespeare

i. Introduction Lecture

ii. Online Content

c. Drama: Act I – Macbeth

i. Prereading Lecture

ii. Vocabulary

iii. Act I: Macbeth

iv. Reading Lecture

v. Homework/Practice Answers

d. Reading Journal: When you think back to the opening scene or chapter of some works, you realize that early incidents or events became more and more important as you go further on in the work. This writer’s technique is foreshadowing, or hinting or suggesting outcomes early in a work without giving the whole story away. The real importance of the first scene might not be revealed until much later in the work—perhaps not until the very end. Macbeth is a play that uses foreshadowing in such a way to suggest to the reader (or viewer) the conflicts yet to come.

e. Drama: Act II – Macbeth

i. Prereading Lecture

ii. Act II: Macbeth

iii. Homework/Practice Answers

f. Topic Test

i. Topic Review

g. Drama: Act III – Macbeth

i. Prereading Lecture

ii. Act III: Macbeth

iii. Homework/Practice Answers

h. Drama: Act IV – Macbeth

i. Prereading Lecture

ii. Vocabulary

iii. Act IV: Macbeth

iv. Homework/Practice Answers

i. Drama: Act V – Macbeth

i. Prereading Lecture

ii. Vocabulary

iii. Act V: Macbeth

iv. Reading Lecture

v. Homework/Practice Answers

2. Self-Discovery in World Literature

a. Ramayana

i. Introduction Lecture

ii. Vocabulary

iii. Ramayana: Cantos XLVI (―The Guest‖) and XLVII (―Ravan’s Wooing‖)

iv. Reading Lecture

v. Ramayana: Cantos XLVIII (―Ravan’s Speech‖) and XLIX (―The Rape of Sita‖)

vi. Reading Lecture

vii. Ramayana: Cantos CXVII (―Sita’s Disgrace‖), CXVIII (―Sita’s Reply‖), and CXIX (―Glory to Vishnu‖)

viii. Postreading Lecture

ix. Homework/Practice Answers

b. The Metamorphosis (Kafka)

i. Introduction Lecture

ii. Vocabulary

iii. The Metamorphosis: Part I

iv. Reading Lecture

v. The Metamorphosis: Part II

vi. Reading Lecture

vii. The Metamorphosis: Part III

viii. Postreading Lecture

c. Mini-Essay (2–3 pages): Write a multiparagraph literary analysis. Analyze the use of vivid language in either Ramayana or The Metamorphosis. Support your thesis with meaningful examples and references from the text, carefully citing any direct quotations.

i. Homework/Practice Answers

d. A Happy Excursion (Lin Yutang)

i. Introduction Lecture

ii. Vocabulary

iii. A Happy Excursion: First 2/3

iv. Reading Lecture

v. A Happy Excursion: Final 1/3

vi. Postreading Lecture

vii. Homework/Practice Answers

e. Life Is a Dream (Pedro Calderón de la Barca)

i. Introduction Lecture

ii. Vocabulary

iii. Life Is a Dream: Act I

iv. Reading Lecture

v. Life Is a Dream: Act II

vi. Reading Lecture

vii. Life Is a Dream: Act III

viii. Postreading Lecture

f. Timed Writing: These selections from world literature represent very different locations and time periods. Despite these differences, create a well-organized essay that addresses common similarities or differences about what each culture values and the manner in which the text’s literary elements develop and highlight these values.



3. Unit Four Essay: Self-discovery is usually the culminating step in a personal journey. Select two of the readings from this unit and describe one character’s literal journey and her or his journey toward self-discovery. In your analysis, address the role figurative language plays in developing the journey.


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