2nd 8 Week Session Course Availability



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2nd 8 Week Session Course Availability

This list is the most current indicator of available seats in the Second Eight Week Session and Non-Standard Duration classes appropriate for University Division students. The availability numbers in the online Schedule of Classes are not current at this time of year.


If a class is not included on this list, it is because the University Division has been notified by the Department/School that it has given the last Permissions for the remaining seats in the class.
This list is provided and maintained by University Division Academic Advising staff as a courtesy to our students. We keep this list as current as we possibly can and make corrections and updates on a continuous basis.
Most classes in this list will only fulfill elective requirements in most degree programs. Please discuss your options with your academic advisor if you have any questions or concerns.
Due to the complexity of the various financial assistance packages, University Division strongly recommends that whenever you plan to drop and/or add one or more classes, you first contact the Office of Student Financial Assistance (OSFA) to find out how the change may affect your current financial aid status and your eligibility for future aid. You can send an e-mail to rsvposfa@indiana.edu or visit the OSFA in Franklin Hall, room 208.
Be sure to check for time conflicts with your current Class Schedule and the Final Examination Schedule.

>>>> Second Eight Week Session Class Availability 02/11 – 02/15 <<<<
Subject Catalog# Description Units Class# Component Time Day Building Room Distribution
AAAD-A 398 ADV TPCS IN SOCIAL&HIST AAADS 3.0 29947 04:00 PM -06:00PM TuTh JH A106 COLL S&H

TOPIC: BLACKS IN AMERICAN SOCIAL SCIENCE. COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.


AAAD-A 399 ADV TPCS IN ARTS&HUMANITIES AAADS 3.0 29940 ? ? ? ? COLL A&H

TOPIC: BLACK DANCE HISTORY. COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.


AAAD-A 399 ADV TPCS IN ARTS&HUMANITIES AAADS 3.0 31839 03:35 PM -05:35 PM MW SW 219 COLL A&H

TOPIC: SLAVERY, MEDICINE, AND HEALTH. COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.



AERO-A 100 INTRO TO AEROSPACE STUDIES 2.0 5110 2:30 PM -04:00 PM MW GY 143

COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.


AMST-A 200 COMPARATIVE AMER IDENTITIES 3.0 29843 04:00 PM -06:00 PM TuTh SY 003 COLL A&H

TOPIC: DEMOCRACY ON THE HOMEFRONT. This course examines the dynamics of race and labor through the rural and urban comparative lived experiences of a variety of different groups, including Mexican braceros, Latino “Zoot Suiters” African American industrial workers, Victory Farm Volunteers, the Women’s Land Army, Japanese internees, and Jamaican and Filipino farm workers. Critical questions will shape our exploration of race and labor over the course of the semester: How is race defined during wartime? Is there a relationship between race and labor, and if so, what is it? How could we characterize the lived experiences of these different groups? How were they similar? How were they different? Designed to reflect the complexity of human experience and thought, this course allows students to grapple with issues associated with race and labor within the context of a global war in a variety of urban and rural settings. Through an interdisciplinary theoretical framework which fuses American Studies, History, Journalism, Literature and Anthropology with a distinctively ethnohistorical methodology, this course utilizes written texts, novels, visual arts, music, and other performing arts, wartime propaganda, and governmental reports to foster the growth of interpretive and critical skills. An understanding of the dynamics of race and labor must be grounded in an examination of the world of individuals going about their business and in the communities in and out of which they move. The assignments in the class reflect this goal, both in the readings and through the development of ethnohistorical skills of analysis.


AMST-A 201 U.S. MOVEMENTS AND INSTITUTIONS 3.0 31859 04:00 PM -06:00 PM MW SY 002 COLL A&H

TOPIC: RACE, SEX, AND POPULAR CULTURE. COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.




ANTH-A 200 TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLGY 3.0 32072 02:30 PM -04:45 PM MW SB 060 COLL S&H

TOPIC: HUMAN SKELETON. This course provides students with hands-on experience with human skeletal anatomy. Techniques for determining age, sex, stature and ancestry from bones will be covered. We will read studies on applications of these techniques to forensic anthropology and archaeology.


ANTH-P 250 INTRODUCTORY WORLD ARCHAEOLOGY 3.0 29163 11:15 AM -12:30 PM MW SB 150

07:00 PM -09:15 PM Tu SB 150

This class throws you into a world of archaeological discovery in the Americas, Asia, Europe, Africa, and the Near East. We touch on archaeology’s basic philosophy, methods, and theories as we review the last 10,000 years of human history, looking for what varies from epoch to epoch and place to place—and what doesn’t. We focus on specific problems, people, and places—King Tut’s tomb, Stonehenge worshipers, warring Vikings, Cahokia’s dead, human sacrifices, and slaves. The course is planned for non-Anthropology majors, and is meant to appeal to students who have always had an interest in archaeology but who may or may not know much about the deep past. You’ll see that archaeological finds from around the world help us understand all of human history.
ASCS-Q 294 BASIC CAREER DEVELOPMENT 2.0 12253 11:15 AM -12:30 PM MW PC 001

12254 11:15 AM -12:30 PM TuTh PC 001

12256 04:00 PM -05:15 PM MW PC 001

$30 FEE. GRADED ON A S/F BASIS. ASCS Q294 is a course designed for freshmen and sophomores who are in the process of choosing a major or exploring career fields. The course covers the three components of good career decision-making: SELF-INFORMATION - involving the exploration of your interests, values, and skills, and personality as they relate to careers and the world of work. DECISION-MAKING PROCESS - involving a systematic approach to deciding on a major and/or a career. RESEARCH - on various academic majors and career fields using campus and community resources. This course is ideal for students who want to... Explore a variety of majors or career choices, Gain a better understanding of their personality style, interests, values, and skills in relation to a major/career choice, Research more in-depth information about a particular career field, Participate in a structured approach to basic career planning. At the end of this course, you'll have a clearer understanding of career options and their relationship to your academic choices.


ASCS-Q 299 JOB SRCH STRAT LIB ARTS STDNTS 2.0 14119 04:00 PM -05:15 PM MW WH 007

14122 02:30 PM -03:45 PM TuTh PC 001

24976 11:15 AM -12:30 PM TuTh SY 003

$30 FEE. GRADED ON A S/F BASIS. ASCS Q299 is a 2 credit hour, 8-week course to teach you how to conduct an effective job or internship search. Learn how to: Perfect a resume outlining your skills and qualifications, Write an impressive cover letter, Understand interviewing dynamics, Network effectively. Through ASCS Q299 you will also be able to: Analyze how your skills, interests and values affect your career search, Identify marketable skills developed from a liberal arts education and learn how to convey the value of those skills to employers, Locate resources that will assist you in finding a professional position, Prepare for a smooth transition from school to post-graduate endeavors. The mastery of these skills is critical regardless of your post-graduate plans. ASCS Q299 is open to all IU students of sophomore, junior, or senior status.


BUS-A 100 BASIC ACCOUNTING SKILLS 1.0 15857 01:25 PM -02:15 PM MW PY 100

Introduces students to the accounting and financial information environment of the firm. Presents information including (1) financial accounting, (2) auditing and assurance, (3) management accounting, and (4) tax accounting. Includes current real-world examples taken from the popular business press. Provides students with the foundation necessary for higher-level accounting courses.



CEUS-U 320 TPCS IN CENTRAL EURASIAN STDS 3.0 29135 04:00 PM -06:15 PM TuTh SB 231

TOPIC: ASPECTS OF ESTONIAN CULTURE: OLD BARNEY, THE CZAR’S MADMAN AND ESTONIAN SURVIVAL. The course will explore the unique culture of Estonia by asking: what are the values, ideas, strategies and energy sources that have made it possible for the culture of the small nation to survive centuries under foreign rule and oppressive power to become one of the most dynamic modern states of the European Union? Who are the heroes of this Finno-Ugric-speaking group of people on the Baltic Sea? We will see that the sword-wielding giant Kalevipoeg of the 19th century national epic is not a typical warrior hero, and moreover, he might not be the best survivor hero at all. He is offered strong competition by smart peasants and trickster barn-keepers, who know how to handle goblins, speak to the snakes and deal with the devil, the Baltic German nobleman who is clearly crazy as he married an Estonian woman and dares to tell the Czar how to run the country, a booze-loving village bell-ringer who insists of telling the truth against all odds, and most improbably, a wandering medieval knight and his fair lady, who travel the silver screen in 1960s hairdos seeking freedom and truth for themselves and their people, oblivious to the censorship of Brezhnev´s Soviet regime. We will explore a variety of texts including folklore, fiction, rock lyrics and advertising copy, watch films and read two short modern novels to trace the characters and symbols important in Estonian culture, to understand what motivated and will motivate Estonians to keep and develop their unique heritage. The Estonian example will also serve to highlight the issues a small nation faces in trying to preserve its cultural identity.

There will be a midterm exam and a final essay as well as short weekly quizzes.
CEUS-U 320 TPCS IN CENTRAL EURASIAN STDS 3.0 32051 04:00 PM -06:15 PM TuTh LI 851

TOPIC: MONGOLIA’S MIDDLE AGES. Asked about Mongolia, the average person knows only about the world empire built by Genghis Khan. Recent visitors to Mongolia hear about the 1990 democratic transition, how the previous Communist regime had been installed by the Red Army in 1921, and how the Buddhist clergy which had ruled the country after independence from China in 1911 was destroyed in the 1930s. But what happened in between the fall of the Mongol empire in 1368 and the restoration of Mongolian independence in 1911? This class “fills in the gaps” in the common knowledge of Mongolia.  In fact traditional Mongolia was made in these “Middle Ages.” The “Second Conversion” to Buddhism after 1575, the aristocratic society established under Batu-Möngke Dayan Khan (c. 1480-1518), and Manchu-Chinese rule in Mongolia formed the ancient regime against which twentieth-century revolutionaries revolted. Likewise, Buriats and Kalmyks were profoundly transformed by Russian rule from 1605 to 1771. Mongolia’s traditions of epics, oral poetry, and folk tales assumed their modern form from the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries. The great Oirat confederacies, first of Esen who captured the Chinese emperor in 1449, and then of the seventeenth-eighteenth century Zunghars, Kalmyks, and Upper Mongols, first rose to dominate Inner Asia from Tibet to Crimea but then were virtually destroyed by foreign attacks and insurrections of their form Kazakh and Tibetan subjects. Mongolia’s Middle Ages treats all of these topics and more in a combination of lecture and discussion. 


CEUS-U 320 TPCS IN CENTRAL EURASIAN STDS 3.0 32052 01:15 PM -03:15 PM ThF GB 107

TOPIC: BUDDHISM AND ASTROLOGY. Christianity and Modern Science have rendered the subject of this course obsolete in English. Though likened to “astrology,” the correct term is “mathematics” – not as we know it today but as it was known in Buddhism and throughout Eurasia prior to the European Enlightenment.  The real subject is science proper, that is, not so much the understanding of nature as we conceive the role of Science today but the ordering of chaos, a subject as vital today as ever – whether ostensibly obsolete or not. Though Mongolian Buddhist mathematics (a.k.a. astronomy/astrology/science) might seem arcane and extraneous, its syncretistic, catholic tradition among the Mongols preserves layers of influence that reveal not only the history of traditional science across Eurasia but the fundamental principles of knowledge. In this course we will examine the relationship between science and religion from the point of view of the problem of time.  In the process we will see definitively how subjects such as apotropaic medicine, magic, ritual, divinity, and divination – all too often studied fruitlessly in isolation – are inter-related in and integral to traditional science and predicated upon empirical observation in nature.  We will examine the role traditional mathematics played in Asian society from the time of the Mongol Empire through the modern era.  We will see too how Buddhist mathematics compares with Modern Science and other knowledge systems of Eurasia; how mathematics fits within the greater Buddhist tradition; and how it relates to Inner Asian shamanism.



CEUS-U 320 TPCS IN CENTRAL EURASIAN STDS 3.0 32053 04:00 PM -06:15 PM TuTh WH 202

FOLK-F 312 EUR FOLKLORE/FOLKLIFE/FOLK MUS 3.0 32092 04:00 PM -06:15 PM TuTh WH 202 COLL A&H, CSB

TOPIC: VILLAGE LIFE, FOLK ART, DANCE AND MUSIC TRADITIONS IN HUNGARY. Hungary has a uniquely wide spectrum of recent folk dance and music scene rising out from the so-called “dance-house movement”, an urban youth movement in the period of late socialism since the 1970-80s. Young people, who were searching for the “authentic” tradition of the “undisturbed” village life, started relearning dance and music from remarkable personalities of peasant performers in the “field” within Hungary and in the neighboring countries. Ethnomusicology (Béla Bartók, Zoltán Kodály as prominent pioneers), dance study and ethnography provided academic background. In the countries of East Central Europe many people has been living in the rural countryside who belonged to tightly knit local communities with rich network of human connections, strong feelings of loyalty and solidarity, sharing and displaying common ideals, esthetics and cultural expressions. They could richly supply themselves with non-material values such social occasions, feasts, joy, entertainment to such an extent that they could balance the vain of material goods of their self-denying every day life. The rich regional traditions of peasant costume, architecture, decorated objects with special symbolism, folk poetry, music and dance evolved gradually from the late medieval and early modern antecedents, had peak periods in the 19th and early 20th century and has been disintegrating during the 20th century up to recent days. The long-lived semi-feudalism and agrarian economy ensured that peasant culture had a late flourishment and a long afterlife. The discovery of peasant culture by non-peasants (elite, artists, scholars, urban middle class etc.) is part of the scene of the period of national awakening, embourgeoisment, inter-war period and communism. The evolution, the use and the reinterpretations of the concept of the “folk” played an essential role in the “invention” of East-Central European national cultures and ideologies. Various different forces and groups, movements and parties discovered, represented, often exploited and corrupted what they had meant by folk culture. There will be an emphasis on interpreting phenomena in its social history and East-Central European regional context. The material is partly based on the field‑experience of the instructor; field-photos, music and dance recordings will be used for illustration.


CHEM-C 243 SUPPLEMENTAL GENERAL CHEMISTRY 2.0 25392 LEC 09:05 AM -09:55 AM MWF CH 122

25393 DIS 03:35 PM -04:25 PM W BH 105

For transfer students with General Chemistry I credit from regional campuses or other colleges who plan to take organic chemistry. Equilibrium, kinetics, and thermodynamics will be covered. General Chemistry I plus this course is strongly recommended as preparation for C341. Credit given for only one of C243 or C117.
CJUS-P 300 TOPICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 3.0 12312 02:30 PM -05:00 PM TuTh SE 105

TOPIC: POLICING THE MENTALLY ILL. Since the deinstitutionalization movement in the early 1950's, police increasingly respond to calls involving persons in mental health crisis. As a result, many mentally ill persons enter the criminal justice system. This course examines the history of deinstitutionalization and its impact on police, courts and corrections. We will examine several innovative strategies developed by criminal justice, community and mental health agencies to address the increased criminalization of the mentally ill. The advantages and disadvantages of such strategies will be considered from the perspective of a judge, prosecutor, defense attorney, police officer, and mentally ill offender.


CJUS-P 300 TOPICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 3.0 12313 01:00 PM -03:30 PM MW WH 004

TOPIC: PRISONS AND THE DOLLAR. Countless American lives have been touched by the United States prisons during their two-hundred years of existence. Indeed, in the United States today over 2 million citizens are incarcerated. At today’s rates an estimated 6% of Americans will be incarcerated in a prison in the course of their lives. With these startling statistics in mind, often times one of the most stunning aspects of the United States’ prison system is overlooked – the money factor. From before the birth of the modern prison in the late 18th century into the 21st century resources have figured heavily into the development and extension of the penal system. This course will attempt to address the reality of prisons and their economics since the inception of the modern prison system at the end of the 1700s. Topics covered will include the growth of the use of prisons, the prison labor system (both historically and presently), and privatization in the prison system (including private prisons). Some time will also be spent on the system of inmate economies and trade behind prison walls. Special attention will be paid to the notion of a prison-industrial complex, its causes and consequences, and the costs to society of an entrenched money-driven penal system.


CJUS-P 300 TOPICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 3.0 25938 09:30 AM -10:45 AM MTuWTh GL 101

TOPIC: CRIME, MASS MEDIA, AND SOCIETY. This course is designed to analyze relationships between mass media, crime and the criminal justice system. The media plays a fundamental role in shaping images of deviance and criminality in American society. Therefore it is necessary to investigate media practices and critically analyze the influence of mass media on legislation and public policy. Students in this course will learn techniques to analyzing media messages and how to conduct a content analysis. The above issues will be applied to various forms of media including print media, television, film, and the internet.


CMCL-C 121 PUBLIC SPEAKING 3.0 29683 07:15 PM -09:15 PM TuTh SY 0013

C121 at Indiana University is a contemporary course in the ancient and practical art of rhetoric. It is founded on the premise that rhetorical action (including the focus of our course, public speaking) is public action. It is a course designed to help you recognize situations in which your rhetorical action can contribute to the well-being of a community. Each assignment and speech is an opportunity to engage a rhetorical situation in order to (1) create an audience out of a collection of individuals and (2) invite that audience to understand something in a particular way or motivate them to help resolve some problem about which you think they should be concerned. As a contemporary student of this ancient and practical art, you face some of the same challenges that students have faced in similar courses that have been taught for over 2,000 years. We believe you'll find these challenges personally, intellectually, and professionally rewarding.


CMLT-C 100 FRESHMAN SEMINAR 3.0 29925 ? ? ? ? COLL A&H

TOPIC: LOVE AND LITERATURE. This course will examine some of the major texts which have taught us how to identify and name our feelings of love, from erotic attraction (Ovid’s Art of Love, for instance) to spiritual and religious love (from Plato to the Bible and early Christian fathers, such as Augustine). We are going to look at the ways in which novels, poems, and the visual arts use such models -- adapt them, portray them at odds with each other, or attempt to reconcile them -- in order to teach, admonish, entertain, and even seduce the reader. The selection of texts will mark the transition from pagan antiquity to Christianity, and from the early modern to our modern and apparently secular world. Course requirements: two exams, two essays, very short writing assignments and regular attendance and participation.


CMLT-C 378 TOPICS IN YIDDISH CULTURE 3.0 25621 04:30 PM -06:30 PM MW BH 317 COLL A&H, CSA

GER-Y 350 TOPICS IN YIDDISH CULTURE 3.0 14483 04:30 PM -06:30 PM MW BH 317 COLL A&H, CSA

TOPIC: CULTURE, MEMORY AND IDENTITY: YIDDISH IN THE POST-HOLOCAUST WORLD. COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.


CSCI-A 112 PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS 1.5 6319 LEC 11:15 AM -12:05 PM MW TV 226

6320 LAB 09:30 AM -10:45 AM TuTh LH 025

6321 LAB 04:00 PM -05:15 PM TuTh SE 045

P: A110, A111, or equivalent computing experience. Choose one Lecture and one laboratory. Introduction to programming for users of computer systems. Emphasis on problem solving techniques.


CSCI-A 290 ADVENTURES IN COMPUTING 1.5 27042 07:00 PM -08:10 PM TuTh LH 115

TOPIC: JAVA. COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.


CSCI-A 290 ADVENTURES IN COMPUTING 1.5 29753 07:15 PM -08:25 PM TuTh LH 115

TOPIC: PYTHON SCRIPTING LANGUAGE WITH INTERNET APPLICATIONS. COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.


EDUC-U 205 HUM DEV OPPORT-COLLEGE STUDENT 1.0 7022 07:00 PM -08:30 PM TU ED 1006

7023 05:30 PM -07:00 PM Th ? ?

COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.
EDUC-U 495 SEMINAR IN LEADERSHIP TRAINING 1.0 7038 1:00 PM -3:00 PM W ? ?

TOPIC: YOUR ROLE AS A LEADER IN SOCIETY. This course will reflect on personality and leadership styles, and how those play into a person’s ability to serve as a leader in their home, work, community, and beyond. Specific topics include: respecting and understanding others’ values, communication and team dynamics, the difference between leader and manager, and the link between service and leadership.


EDUC-U 495 SEMINAR IN LEADERSHIP TRAINING 1.0 28409 1:00 PM -3:00 PM Tu ? ?

TOPIC: INTRODUCTION TO LEADERSHIP. An introduction to leadership for students who are interested in making a difference. What makes one a leader. What is leadership? What skills does a leader need to be successful? Can leaders be ethical? These questions and more will be answered as students explore the many facets of leadership through readings, discussion and experiential activities. Participants will develop skills and define what leadership means for you.


EDUC-U 495 SEMINAR IN LEADERSHIP TRAINING 1.0 29609 10:00 AM -12:00 PM Th

TOPIC: DIVERSITY TOPICS IN LEADERSHIP. This course will look at leadership from different historical and cultural perspectives. Different approaches to and definitions of leadership will be explored. Learn what leadership means from a variety of perspectives and how others perceive the concept of “leader.”



EDUC-U 495 SEMINAR IN LEADERSHIP TRAINING 1.0 29610 2:00 PM -4:00 PM Tu ? ?

TOPIC: ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP. Students will explore the areas of organizational dynamics and functions as well as develop an understanding of the roles and responsibilities of the various constituents that exist within organizations. Become more informed and learn how to assist your organization in becoming a more productive and healthy group.


EDUC-W 201 BEGINNING TECHNOLOGY SKILLS 1.0 7057 09:05 AM -09:55 AM MW ED 2025

7059 10:10 AM -11:00 AM MW ED 2025

7061 02:30 PM -03:20 PM MW ED 2025

7063 03:35 PM -04:25 PM MW ED 2025

7065 04:40 PM -05:30 PM MW ED 2025

7066 11:15 AM -12:05 PM TuTh ED 2025

7067 01:25 PM -02:15 PM TuTh ED 2025

11849 05:45 PM -06:35 PM TuTh ED 2025

27013 12:20 PM -01:10 PM MW ED 2025

27014 12:20 PM -01:10 PM TuTh ED 2025

$65 FEE. GRADED ON A S/F BASIS. COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.
EDUC-X 150 READ - LEARN TECHNIQUES 1 2.0 7142 09:30 AM -11:00 AM MW SK 106

7143 11:15 AM -12:45 PM MW SK 106

7144 01:00 PM -02:30 PM MW SK 106

7145 02:30 PM -04:00 PM MW OP 107

7146 04:00 PM -05:30 PM MW WH 116

7147 09:30 AM -11:00 AM TuTh SK 106

7148 11:15 AM -12:45 PM TuTh SK 106

7149 01:00 PM -02:30 PM TuTh SK 106

7150 09:30 AM -11:00 AM MW SK 104

7151 04:00 PM -05:30 PM TuTh BQ C147A

15568 01:00 PM -02:30 PM TuTh SK 104

15569 01:00 PM -02:30 PM TuTh LI E451

COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.
FOLK-F 307 MID EASTERN FOLKLORE/LIFE/MUS 3.0 31891 05:45 PM -07:45 PM TuTh BH 247 COLL A&H, CSA

TOPIC: ARABIAN NIGHTS – EAST AND WEST. In 1704 the French Orientalist Antoine Galland introduced The Thousand and One Nights to the Western World. Few written or printed documents received more public attention worldwide than did this compendium of re-written folk narratives and its Western derivative known as The Arabian Nights. The impact of the Nights on cultures across the world has been profound. This course explores a variety of issues related to the work from interdisciplinary perspectives.


FOLK-F 351 N AMER FOLKLORE/FOLKLIFE/MUSIC 3.0 32071 09:30 AM -12:00 PM MF 501 N. PARK COLL A&H, CSA

TOPIC: FOLKLORE OF STUDENT LIFE. COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.


FRIT-M 311 ITALIAN FILM AND CULTURE 3.0 24832 LEC 02:30 PM -04:30 PM TuTh BH 238 COLL A&H, CSB

FILM 07:00 PM -10:00 PM W BH 006

The Italian Cinema is a good way to study the whole Italian history, society, ideology and behaviours. Students will have the opportunity to know such authors as Rossellini, De Sica, Fellini, Antonioni, Visconti, Pasolini, Bertolucci, who are well known even in the US; but they will also have information about less famous directors (such as De Santis, Monicelli, Moretti, Tornatore, Wertmüller), about the Italian "star system", the national industry and mode of production, the relationship between film & television. The main historical periods are the following: the shift between Fascism and the Postwar period, the so called "Neorealism", the economic growth, the sixties and seventies, the contemporary time. Main areas of interest will be the analysis of the film text, its relationship with the social context and with politics, the development of authorship. The course will also focus on the difference between auteur films and genre films (comedy, mythological, western, and so on); it will stress the gender point of view (the female role in Italian Cinema) and deal with the problem of the film industry. Strong attention will be paid to the film techniques (lighting, editing, acting, direction) and to the cinematic language and grammar. Midterm and final exams are required. The midterm will be a multiple question test in class, the final a paper to be submitted by the last class. The students could be asked either to discuss the class topics in an oral exam or to answer to some questions about the textbook.

GER-K 350 TOPICS IN SCANDINAVIAN CULTURE 3.0 25721 03:35 PM -05:30 PM TuTh BH 247 COLL A&H, CSB

WEUR-W 406 SPECL TOPICS IN WEST EUR STDS 3.0 14979 03:35 PM -05:30 PM TuTh BH 247 COLL A&H, CSB

TOPIC: SCANDINAVIAN CULTURE: MULTI-ETHNIC NORTH. Since the 1970's there has been a tremendous change in the ethnic landscapes of the Scandinavian societies as they opened to political and economic refugees from various parts of the world. The steady influx of immigrants gradually transformed these traditionally single-ethnic societies into vibrant multi-cultural entities. Numerous literary works, films and musical pieces created by immigrant authors have appeared in the past 20-30 years reshaping dramatically and irreversibly the way Scandinavia comprehends and relates to belonging, otherness, ethnic identity and nationality. The new "immigrant", "transnational", "world" literature, film and music tell stories of migration and exile, split identity, bilingualism and loneliness, but also recount the intoxicating experience of gaining freedom, and emphasize the appreciation of creative challenge and cultural enrichment. This course will approach Scandinavian culture through the exciting lens of the immigrant eye. How is Scandinavia today illuminated by the immigrant tales? How does the "host culture" respond and cope with the challenges posited by the "newcomers"? This is one of the most exciting angles from which Scandinavia can be studied today. It relates further to our experience as citizens of a global, "transnational" world in need of more understanding. The final grade will be based on three response papers on the texts and films, a final exam, a final paper, regular class attendance, and participation in the class discussions.


GER-N 450 THE GOLDEN AGE DUTCH CULTURE 3.0 25734 02:30 PM -04:30 PM TuTh BH 245 COLL A&H, CSB

WEUR-W 406 SPECL TOPICS IN WEST EUR STDS 3.0 28051 02:30 PM -04:30 PM TuTh BH 245 COLL A&H, CSB

TOPIC: DAILY LIFE THROUGH THE EYES OF PAINTERS. Taught in English; no prerequisites. Course open to graduates and undergraduates. The Dutch Golden Age was one of the most spectacular creative periods in the history of the world. It was the time of Rembrandt, Vermeer, Spinoza, Grotius, and the Dutch Republic as it was called at the time, hosted many other renowned artists. It also had an immense impact on global commerce, finance, shipping and technology. In the first part of the course, we will briefly look at The Netherlands, the rise of the so-called Dutch Republic; their mentality and culture in particular. The second and larger part of this course will go deeper into all aspects of the Dutch culture. Special attention will be given to Vermeer, Steen, Rembrandt, Bredero, Vondel and Cats. All literature will be read in English and the course will be conducted in English. The course grade will be based on the following criteria: a paper, a final exam, class attendance, clicker questions and participation in class discussions.


GLLC-G 220 GLOBAL VILLAGE COLLOQUIUM 3.0 24950 02:30 PM -03:45 PM MTuWTh FQ 012 COLL S&H

TOPIC: INTERNATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY. The purpose of this course is to encourage students to think critically about both national and international efforts in controlling for illicit substances. Throughout this course we will explore different forms of drug control from the perspective of both administrative and criminal attempts in the regulation of illicit substances. The course is designed to allow students to analyze common discourse about drugs covering a variety of international policies as well as an introduction to U.S. drug control policy. Specifically, students will assess the impact of globalization on the control of illicit substances; gain knowledge about the history of both domestic and international drug wars; analyze conceptual and methodological issues in the study of illicit substances; learn how crime control priorities are constructed in relation to illicit substances; understand the politics behind economic resources and allocations of specific regions; appreciate the socio-cultural implications of foreign policy; identify problems and differences of specific countries method of drug control; and, be able to obtain a sensible understanding of politics and policymaking reform.




GLLC-S 104 GLLC FRESHMAN SEMINAR 3.0 29516 04:00 PM -06:30 PM TuTh FQ 012 COLL S&H, TFR

COLL-S 104 FRESHMAN SEMINAR IN S&H 3.0 29540 04:00 PM -06:30 PM TuTh FQ 012 COLL S&H, TFR

TOPIC: IMMIGRATION AND ETHNIC POLICY. In this course we will explore ways in which one's culture and identity (traditional and contemporary, from one's homeland and in one's new environment) can manifest themselves in art, music, food, clothing, language, social structure, religion, worldview, etc. We will do this through posing a series of questions: What do people arrive with beyond their physical baggage? What do they choose to keep and discard from their native culture? How do they choose to "perform" or display this to each other and to the outside? Students will learn and discuss core concepts from a variety of fields, things such as language maintenance and shift; boundary construction and negotiation; material culture; generation gap; regional variation; endogamy and exogamy; and acculturation, assimilation, and transculturation. At the core will be the concept of identity and the many forms it can take. Students will also learn basic techniques of urban fieldwork in order to carry out interviews and projects later in the semester. All of these will come together in the process of trying to answer what it means to be "ethnic" in America. Note: This course is joint-listed with COLL-S 104 (Honors).



HIST-D 330 EASTERN EUROPE:1944-PRESENT 3.0 25833 09:30 AM -10:45 AM MTuWTh KH 212 COLL S&H, CSA

This course will explore the Communist and post-Communist periods in the history of Eastern Europe – the region between Russia and Germany, stretching from the Baltic states to the Balkans. Topics covered will include the establishment of Communism; the effects of World War Two; the experience of Communism; the emergence of dissent; factors in the fall of Communism; and the transformation of the region since 1989, including the Yugoslav genocides.


HPER-A 363 COACHING OF BASEBALL 2.0 12994 LEC 01:00 PM -01:50 PM TuTh HP 010

12995 LAB 02:00 PM -02:50 PM TuTh Woodlawn Field

OPEN TO KINESIOLOGY MAJORS AND MINORS WITH JUNIOR STANDING. COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.
HPER-A 370 COACHING OF SOCCER 2.0 8213 LEC 10:10 AM -11:00 AM TuTh AS 056

8214 LAB 11:15 AM -12:05 PM TuTh ? ?

OPEN TO KINESIOLOGY MAJORS AND MINORS AND COACHING ENDORSEMENT PROGRAM WITH JUNIOR STANDING. COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.
HPER-E 111 BASKETBALL 1.0 8271 01:25 PM -02:15 PM MTuWTh MG 199

8272 02:30 PM -03:20 PM MTuWTh MG 199

COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.
HPER-E 119 PERSONAL FITNESS 2.0 8294 LEC 04:00 PM -06:30 PM M BH 109

8295 LAB 09:25 AM -10:40 AM F MG 293

$60 FEE. COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.
HPER-E 133 FITNESS & JOGGING I 1.0 28147 01:25 PM -02:15 PM MTuWTh MG 092

GRADED ON A S/F BASIS. COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.


HPER-E 185 VOLLEYBALL 1.0 8360 01:25 PM -02:15 PM MTuWTh MG 199

COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.



HPER-E 187 WEIGHT TRAINING 1.0 8365 08:00 AM -08:50 AM MTuWTh MG 092

8366 01:25 PM -02:15 PM MTuWTh MG 092

GRADED ON A S/F BASIS. COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.
HPER-E 281 TENNIS - INTERMEDIATE 1.0 8411 09:00 AM -10:00 AM MWF Tennis Center

$120 FEE. COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.


HPER-E 370 SCUBA CERTIFICATION 2.0 24815 ? ? ? ?

$140 FEE. COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.


HPER-E 477 WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTOR 1.0 8430 01:00 PM -02:15 PM MTuWTh MG 194

P: MUST SWIM 500 YARDS CONTINUOUSLY. COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.


HPER-E 496 ADVANCED ALPINE SKIING (ASPEN) 3.0 14990 ? ? ? ?

$. COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.


HPER-H 235 OBESITY AND HEALTH 3.0 14949 04:00 PM -06:30 PM MW SW 007

An introduction to the physiological, social, cultural and behavioral aspects of healthy weight management and obesity prevention. Topics will also include the impact of obesity on individual, family and community health.


HPER-H 263 PERSONAL HEALTH 3.0 8488 04:00 PM -06:30 PM MW JH 239

8484 04:00 PM -06:30 PM TuTh MO 007

8489 04:00 PM -06:30 PM TuTh BH 003

28599 05:45 PM -08:15 PM MW BU 300

This survey course provides a theoretical and practical treatment of the concepts of disease prevention and health promotion. Covers such topics as emotional health; aging and death; alcohol, tobacco, and drug abuse; physical fitness; nutrition and dieting; consumer health; chronic and communicable diseases; safety; and environmental health.
HPER-H 315 CONSUMER HEALTH 3.0 28848 05:45 PM -08:15 PM MW OP 111

Provides students with (1) a model for making informed consumer health related decisions; (2) current information involving informed decisions; (3) mechanisms for continued consumer awareness and protection, i.e., sources of accurate consumer information and lists of consumer information and protection agencies.


HPER-R 100 RECREATION LEADERSHIP SKILLS 1.0 27228 02:30 PM -04:25 PM W BH 139

TOPIC: THE PLAYGROUND IN THE 21ST CENTURY. COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.


HPER-R 160 FOUNDATIONS OF REC & LEISURE 3.0 8656 08:00 AM -08:50 AM D WH 120

COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.



HPER-R 241 WILDFLOWERS & WILD EDIBLES 3.0 8660 03:35 PM -05:30 PM M BH 347

COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.


HPER-R 282 DIVERSITY LEADERSHIP 3.0 26543 05:45 PM -08:15 PM MW BH 244

COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.


HPER-S 217 SAFETY: A PERSONAL FOCUS 3.0 8729 04:00 PM -06:50 PM TuTh WH 121

This course surveys current topics of interest in safety. Areas explored include injury problems, safety analysis, home safety, fire safety, personal protection, responding to emergencies, firearm safety, motor vehicle safety, occupational safety, recreational safety, school safety, and related issues.


HPER-S 317 TOPICAL SEMINAR IN SAFETY EDUC 3.0 8732 04:00 PM -06:30 PM MW BH 304

TOPIC: CHEMICAL SAFETY FOR CONSUMERS. COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.


HPER-S 317 TOPICAL SEMINAR IN SAFETY EDUC 3.0 8733 04:00 PM -06:30 PM TuTh FA 102

TOPIC: PREPARING FOR NATURAL DISASTERS. COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.


HPSC-X 102 SCI REVOLUTIONS: PLATO TO NATO 3.0 14352 11:15 AM -01:15 PM TuTh KH 203 COLLS&H

Where did modern science come from? Is it a stockpile of technique and knowledge that has accumulated slowly and steadily over the centuries? This course presents a more complex and dynamic picture, in which the history of science also takes unexpected twists, turns and conceptual leaps, in response to changing social, political and religious interests, and to shifting scientific assumptions, methods, and forms of organization. The course introduces the most important formative steps in the scientific tradition, each of which overturned earlier ways of investigating and understanding nature. These include Aristotelian physics, Ptolmaic astronomy and Galenic medicine in the ancient and Medieval world; the scientific revolutions of the 15th- through the 18th centuries that ushered in Copernican astronomy, Newtonian physics, and new ideas about physiology and medicine; the chemical and Darwinian revolutions; and the rise of modern physics and other 20th-century innovations and problems.


HPSC-X 123 PERSPECTIVES: SCI: SOCIAL&HIST 3.0 29959 06:00 PM -08:00 PM MW SY 001 COLL S&H

TOPIC: FEMINISM, SCIENCE, AND SOCIETY. This course considers the intersections of American feminist movements, scientific research programs, and educational policies. The first half of the course will be divided into chronological units to cover specific topics from 1800 to 1950: How did science education develop at women's seminaries and colleges? What were the relationships between women's (science) education and the 19th- century equal rights movement? How did women gain recognition as professional scientists? What opportunities did the World Wars provide for women to pursue science careers? The second half of the course will consider contemporary issues of epistemology, sociology, and policy: Do women and men pursue fundamentally different research programs in science? If so, is this an effect of social influences or biology? Lastly, we will discuss whether educational policies should or should not encourage women to pursue traditionally masculine/masculinist lines of research.


JOUR-C 201 TOPICS IN JOURNALISM 3.0 8815 06:00 PM -08:00 PM TuTh WH 100

15634 06:00 PM -08:00 PM TuTh EP 220

This course focuses on the role of journalism in shaping our perception of the world. We will look at how the media cover politics, sports, celebrities, conflict and new trends. We'll examine various issues related to that coverage, such as privacy, ethics of the press, citizen journalism, the effects of new technology, gender roles, media ownership, and globalization.
LATS-L 396 SEMINAR IN LATINO STUDIES 3.0 25325 02:30 PM -03:45 PM MW BH 317 COLL S&H, CSA

TOPIC: AFRO-LATINO DIASPORA. This course takes a comparative approach to understanding the historical and contemporary experiences of indigenous and black communities in Latin America Particular attention will be paid to the role of race, “ethnicity,” and identity in the shaping of indigenous and black populations and their contemporary social and political struggles. Most significantly, the course focuses on Afro-Latinos racial experiences in the United States. Since this is an 8 weeks course, I will focus on the historical linkages between colonialism and slavery in Latin America and their impacts on the making of indigenous and black communities as distinct, yet historically interwoven kinds of racialized social formations. It will focus on present-day forms of indigenous and black social and political mobilization that have emerged to challenge histories of racialized oppression and exclusion: from Reggaeton to Bomba, Candomble to Cuban Orisha dances.... and other more intricate concepts.


LING-L 210 TOPICS IN LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY 3.0 15346 04:00 PM -05:15 PM MTuWTh WH 004 COLL S&H

TOPIC: ANIMAL COMMUNICATION. This course deals with the communication systems of non-human animals, addressing them both on their own terms and in comparison with the communication systems of human animals--languages. The primary focus is on communication in bees, birds, frogs, cetaceans (dolphins and whales), and primates, though we will also have something to say about certain other creatures (and perhaps vice versa). Considerable attention is devoted to differences between animals' communicative achievements in the wild vs. in contact with humans. Based on all this, we assess what implications can be drawn from animal communicative behavior about animal cognition more generally.


LING-L 210 TOPICS IN LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY 3.0 28491 04:00 PM -06:00 PM MW SY 108 COLL S&H

TOPIC: AFRICAN COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE. COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.


MATH-M 18 BASIC ALGEBRA FOR FINITE MATH 2.0 27639 12:20 PM -01:10 PM MTuWF BH 219

GRADED ON A S/F BASIS. P: One year of high school algebra. Designed to provide algebraic skills needed for the study of finite mathematics: linear equations and inequalities and their graphs, systems of equations, sets, and basic counting.


MIL-G 102 FOUNDATIONS IN LEADERSHIP 2.0 9192 LEC 03:35 PM -04:25 PM Tu SW 217

9193 LAB 03:35 PM -05:35 PM Th

OPEN TO FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY. COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.

PHIL-P 100 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY 3.0 25981 10:10 AM -11:00 AM MTuWTh BH 236 COLL A&H

COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.


PHIL-P 105 THINKING AND REASONING 3.0 29707 12:20 PM -01:10 PM MTuWTh BH 237 COLL A&H

COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.


PHIL-P 150 ELEMENTARY LOGIC 3.0 25995 12:20 PM -01:10 PM MTuWTh SY 002 COLL A&H

25996 01:25 PM -02:15 PM MTuWTh SY 002 COLL A&H

COURSE DESCRIPTION NOT PROVIDED.

POLS-Y 200 CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL TOPICS 3.0 10651 05:45 PM -08:15 PM MW WH 007 COLL S&H

TOPIC: MUSLIMS IN THE WEST. This course will explore characteristics of Muslim populations and their role in politics in the US and West European countries. We will begin by covering basic tenets of Islam as it pertains to social and political life of Muslim minorities, followed by a close examination of Muslims in the US, Britain, France, Germany and Spain. Some of the topics we will cover are: history of African American Muslims in the US, history of Muslims in West Europe, church-state relations, accommodation of religious practices, religious and ethnic minority politics, political representation of Muslims, multiculturalism, impact of international conflicts on the relation between Muslim minorities and the respective states, and issues of civil rights and liberties after 9/11. We will also watch several movies and documentaries about Muslims in the West to have a better understanding of the social and political dynamics of complex phenomena.


POLS-Y 379 ETHICS AND PUBLIC POLICY 3.0 29667 11:15 AM -01:15 PM TuTh KH 312 COLL A&H

This class focuses on three important questions that lay at the intersection of ethics and public policy. First, which morally problematic means are justified in pursuing valuable political ends? Second, what should the ends of public policy be? Third, what are the moral responsibilities of public officials when they try to answer the first two questions? We will begin each session by evaluating the theory on its own terms. In our second hour, we will apply the principles derived from ethical theory to concrete cases in public policy. We will also use the cases to test the adequacy of the ethical theory. Because this is an eight-week course, it will be quite intense. Requirements include class attendance and participation, one oral presentation, one short paper, one midterm examination, one final examination, and several brief in-class writing assignments. There are no prerequisites for the course.


REL-R 300 STUDIES IN RELIGION 3.0 24963 10:10 AM -11:00 AM MTuWTh BH 215 COLL A&H, CSA

INST-I 370 LIT OF INDIA TRANS: ANC/CLASS 3.0 25585 10:10 AM -11:00 AM MTuWTh BH 215 COLL A&H, CSA

CMLT-C 301 SPEC TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE LIT 3.0 14273 10:10 AM -11:00 AM MTuWTh BH 215 COLL A&H, CSA

TOPIC: MEDIEVAL DEVOTIONAL LITERATURE OF INDIA. What is our duty as human beings? In this course we will explore how ancient Indian intellectuals answered this question, in a variety of contexts. We will consider the role of the natural world as well as the role of social expectations in one's effort to determine the right course of action in any situation. We will begin with a detailed look at the Rig Veda, the oldest extant literature in any Indo-European language. Students will read and discuss in detail two Indian epics, one from the Sanskrit tradition of north India, and one from the Tamil tradition of the south. And finally we will read a play by Kalidasa whose work represents the pinnacle of Sanskrit literature.


REL-R 382 WOMEN IN SOUTH ASIAN REL TRADS 3.0 24974 LEC 02:30 PM -03:20 PM MTuTh BH 247 COLL A&H, CSA

24975 DIS 05:30 PM -08:00 PM W LH 102



INST-I 380 WMN IN S ASIAN RELIGIOUS TRADS 3.0 25590 LEC 02:30 PM -03:20 PM MTuTh BH 247 COLL A&H, CSA

29913 DIS 05:30 PM -08:00 PM W LH 102

We will begin by examining the "official" status and role of women in South Asia, as prescribed in the various religious traditions. I don't expect you already to have thorough knowledge of the many religions we find in South Asia, so we'll cover the basics briefly. From there we will investigate women as the creative agents and participants in the religious expressions of their lives, through their own voices and those of scholars in the field. We'll do this with the help of practitioners of the various religions as well as films, reading, writing, and discussion. Class meetings include one weekly fil
SLAV-C 364 MODERN CZECH LIT & CULTURE 3.0 26125 04:00 PM -06:00 PM TuTh SY 212 COLL A&H, CSA

TOPIC: 20TH CENTURY LITERATURE, HISTORY, AND FILM. Introduction to Czechoslovak literature and culture of the modem period (from 1890s to the end of WWII). It covers such major political events as WWI, formation of Czechoslovak Republic and WWII. The extraordinarily rich literary, scholarly and artistic life of those periods is explored through reading of such authors as J. Hašek, F. Kafka, J. Seifert and K. ?apek, and viewing films related to literary works of the period.


SLAV-P 365 TOPICS IN POLISH LIT & CULTURE 3.0 26134 04:00 PM -06:00 PM TuTh BH 215 COLL A&H

26135 04:00 PM -06:00 PM TuTh BH 215 COLL A&H, IW

TOPIC: POST-COMMUNIST POLISH CULTURE (1989-2008). In the post-communist period (1989-present), Polish culture has undergone profound changes due to the introduction of democracy and development of civil society; the rise of capitalism and switch to market economy; the accession to the European Union in 2004; the erasure of communist censorship; and the influx of Western aesthetic and social ideas. In this course we will discuss how these changes have influenced chosen areas of culture: literature, film, visual arts, theater, music, mass media, and the culture of everyday life. Primary materials: literature, film, fine arts images, song lyrics, video clips. Prose writers: Chwin, Tulli, Tokarczuk, Maslowska, Stasiuk. Poets: Milosz, Szymborska, Rozewicz, Herbert, Zagajewski, Rozycki, Swietlicki. Films by Kieslowski, Holland, Kolski, Trzaskalski, Fabicki. Visual artists: Kozyra, Libera, Rajkowska, Kulik, Nowosielski, Tarasewicz. Issues: Is there a link between contemporary culture and Polish historical heritage? What are the new topics and forms of expression? What accounts for the popularity of today’s dominant cultural trends? How does contemporary Polish culture refract the socio-political changes of the last 19 years of democracy? Requirements: take-home midterm and final. Intensive Writing section: 20 pages of writing and one revision (four papers and one revision) independent of regular class written assignments, as per IU regulations.
SPEA-E 162 ENVIRONMENT AND PEOPLE 3.0 28003 06:00 PM -08:00 PM TuTh WH 111

An interdisciplinary examination of the problems of population, pollution, and natural resources and their implications for society. Credit not given for both SPEA-E 162 and E 262.



SPEA-H 342 COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION 3.0 14870 06:30 PM -08:30 PM TuTh PV 278

A study of theory and practice in the field of professional health education. The process of behavioral change is examined. Procedures for the planning, delivery, and evaluation of health education practices are considered.


SPEA-K 300 STATISTICAL TECHNIQUES 3.0 26428 06:00 PM -08:00 PM MW TH A201

P: MATH-M 014 or equivalent. R: MATH-M 118. An introduction to statistics. Nature of statistical data. Ordering and manipulation of data. Measures of central tendency and dispersion. Elementary probability. Concepts of statistical inference decision: estimation and hypothesis testing. Special

topics discussed may include regression and correlation, analysis of variance, nonparametric methods. Credit not given for both K300 and either ECON E 270/E 370, SOC-S 250, or PSY/MATH-K 310.
SPEA-V 161 URBAN PROBLEMS & SOLUTIONS 3.0 14872 09:30 AM -02:00 PM F PV 277

An introduction to urban policy issues. Topics include political, social, and economic foundations and development of cities and suburbs; urban planning; poverty; and other selected urban problems. Credit not given for both V 161 and V 264.


SPEA-V 220 LAW AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS 3.0 26200 05:30 PM -07:30 PM MW TV 245

The purpose of this course is to provide a basic understanding of the origins, process, and impact of law in the making and implementing of public policy. The course’s major objective is to provide students with the substantive concepts necessary to understand the judicial system and law in its various forms.


SPEA-V 348 MANAGEMENT SCIENCE 3.0 26186 06:00 PM -08:00 PM TuTh WH 009

P: SPEA-K 300, MATH-M 025, or MATH- M 118. Introduction to management science models and methods for policy analysis and public management. Methods include decision analysis, linear programming, queuing analysis, and simulation. Computer-based applications are included. Prior familiarization with computers is recommended, though not required.


SPEA-V 373 HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT PUB SECTOR 3.0 14877 06:00 PM -08:00 PM MW BU 201

The organization and operation of public personnel management systems, with emphasis on concepts and techniques of job analysis, position classification, training, affirmative action, and motivation.


SPEA-V 450 CONTEM ISSUES IN PUBLIC AFF 3.0 12918 05:30 PM -07:30 PM TutH WH 003

TOPIC: E-GOVERNMENT AND I.T. POLICY.  Introduces the foundations of public sector information management with regard to privacy, piracy and information access policies.  We conduct a survey of key information technology polices at several levels, taken from various public agencies, higher education, local, state and federal government, applying conventional policy analysis methods.  We will conduct a study of e-Government with a focus on the current state of implementation, the enabling technologies, best practices for success, and the obstacles hindering the growth of e-Government.  Course content will be drawn from the text, Public Information Technology and E-Governance: Managing the Virtual State by G. David Garson, from various public sector web sites and other sources.  The class format will be highly interactive, discussion and presentation based, requiring routine participation from all class members.


TEL-T 207 INTRO TO TELECOM INDUST & MGMT 3.0 12810 09:30 AM -10:45 AM MTuWTh TV 251 COLL S&H

T207 introduces students to the major telecommunications industries operating in the United States, their history and how they are regulated. It provides an overview of broadcasting, cable television, telephony, and a variety of other “players” in the telecommunications arena. The course looks at how technology is changing the telecommunications industry and the business models used by industries to earn profits. Major segments of the electronic communications industries include programming, distribution, and sales (or funding in the case of non- commercial media). These segments of the industries can by affected by technological developments, regulation and public policy, and how they are managed. All of these considerations will be covered in T207. The main goal is to give students a basic understanding of the wide range of telecommunications providers, how they are evolving and what affects their operations. Class lectures and discussions will supplement the assigned text. The current text for this course is Telecommunications: An Introduction to Electronic Media by Gross and Fink. Student evaluations include performance on one writing assignment, in-class quizzes, and two examinations.


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