1. Creative Industries in Oregon Newspapers, May 2015



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The Creative Oregon Update #6

June 2015


The Creative Oregon Update is the continuation of The Oregon Arts Teacher Update.
The titles in the following table of contents are linked to the articles; each article has a link back to the table of contents.
News and Announcements

1. Creative Industries in Oregon Newspapers, May 2015

2. 2016 National Arts Assessment

3. Farewell
For Students

4. Art Contest

5. Performing and Visual Arts College Fair

6. Scholarships Available for Summer Media Workshops

7. Summer Design Camp

8. Communications Scholarship
Opportunities

9. Creativity Symposium for Educators

10. Summer Music Technology Hands-On Workshops

11. SuperQuest 2015 Summer Workshops

12. Celebration of Teaching and Learning through the Arts Conference
Funding Resources

13. Creative Leadership Grants
Resources

14. Resources for Girls in STEM
Articles

15. Artists Have to Be Entrepreneurs

16. California Lawmakers May Review Arts Education

17. Creativity

18. Do the Arts Go Hand in Hand with Common Core?

19. Education Department Highlights School and Museum Partnerships

20. Girls Design Apps to Solve Real World Issues

21. Hands-on Projects Help Teach STEM Concepts

22. High Value Placed on Music Education

23. History Project Supports Creativity for Students

24. How Movement Can Boost Math Skills

25. How the Arts Create Synergy Between Subjects

26. Improving Everyday Observation Skills

27. Making Art Tied to Fewer Cognitive Problems in Old Age

28. Michigan Elementary School to Launch STEM Classes

29. Mixed Reality Boosts Student Performance

30. Panel Focuses on Skills Learned through the Arts

31. STEM Fields Carry Different Economic Value

32. Students Design Accessible Fishing Pole

33. Study Examines Which Dance Offers Best Exercise for Children

34. Top Educators Use Music and Art to Teach Math and Science

35. Top Starting Pay Goes to Engineers and Computer Scientists

36. Why America’s Obsession with STEM Education is Dangerous

37. Why Liberal Arts is Super Dumb

38. Why Teach Digital Communication?
Videos, Photos, Podcasts, and Webinars

39. How We Got to Now
Just for Fun

40. How to Gird Up Your Loins

41. Origin of the Common Bug

42. Quotes
ODE Resources (in every issue)
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Help get the word out about The Creative Oregon Update – anyone can subscribe! Simply go to http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/page/?id=1843, click on “The Arts Teachers,” scroll down and follow the directions. You may also unsubscribe on the same page.


To submit an article to The Creative Oregon Update, just follow these simple steps:


  1. Write an article. Include all important facts and dates.

  2. Keep it brief. The body of your article should be 75-125 words. Any article more than 150 words may not be used.

  3. Make sure that it is of interest to statewide or regional readers (subscribers are part of the arts education network in Oregon, with a focus on K-12 education for the creative industries).

  4. Including links is encouraged, but attachments are not allowed (please check the links before sending them).

  5. Make sure that the articles are “publication ready,” with no heavy editing necessary.

  6. Use articles in earlier Updates as models (available at http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/page/?id=1873).

  7. Send the article to Michael Fridley at michael.fridley@state.or.us, or fax to L. Simeone at 503-378-5156.

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News and Announcements
1. Creative Industries in Oregon Newspapers, May 2015

A document of links to collected articles may be found at http://www.ode.state.or.us/teachlearn/subjects/arts/creative_industries_in_oregon_newspapers5-15.pdf



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2. 2016 National Arts Assessment

In 2016, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) will again assess eighth grade students in music and the visual arts. A very small number of Oregon middle schools have been selected as part of the national sample. Only national level results will be released. For the 2008 NAEP arts results, go to http://nationsreportcard.gov; for more information contact Beth LaDuca, NAEP State Coordinator, at Beth.Laduca@ode.state.or.us.



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3. Farewell

This is the last Creative Oregon Update that I will produce.  After 17 years and 3 months at the Oregon Department of Education, I am retiring; the first day of my retirement will be June 1, so by the time you read this I will already be gone.


The pilot edition of The Oregon Arts Teacher Update was April 24, 2008; counting that issue, this is the 84th.  The name was changed to The Creative Oregon Update in January, 2015.  Besides the Update, Oregon newspaper articles about the creative industries have been collected starting in February, 2012.
The focus for this listserv has always been wide, encompassing all aspects of creativity and creative education, whether it is found in an arts course, a science fair, or a STEM class; the intent has been to highlight the indispensable role of creativity, aesthetic literacy, and arts education.  The targeted network has been not only k-12 arts teachers, but everyone involved in supporting a system of education that will produce Oregon citizens who embrace creativity as an essential way of life.
I do not know what the plans are for The Creative Oregon Update in the future.  It has been over four years since ODE has supported an Arts Education Specialist; the Update has been continued through Perkins funding for career and technical education because of its application to the Arts, Information and Communications Career Learning Area.  I hope the Update will continue when my position is filled but, if there is a hiatus and no one bothers to inquire about it, this may be the last issue you receive.  My Director is Laura Roach (laura.s.roach@state.or.us, 503-947-5656); the Director for Common Core/College and Career Readiness is Kim Patterson (kim.patterson@state.or.us, 503-947-5713); beginning July 1, the Deputy Superintendent will be Salam Noor (probably salam.noor@state.or.us, 503-947-5740).
It has been an honor to provide what I hope has been a useful service to you, the network without which the Oregon education system would be a much bleaker experience for students; while being much more difficult and time consuming than I imagined, I don’t resent a minute of it.  I feel privileged to have been able to work directly with some of you, especially when we have been able to collaborate as members of a unified team (a “house united”), an essential strategy for success in the challenges we face.  I wish all of you the very best of luck, and I am confident that you will continue to provide the education that students need and deserve, and that you will fight for the creative rights of all Oregonians.  Let your voice be heard.  Should you need to contact me, my home e-mail is mfridley@comcast.net.

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For Students
4. Art Contest

ODE is partnering with the Oregon Arts Commission (OAC) to sponsor a statewide student art contest this fall. The contest is open to K-12 students, with submissions due October 31, 2015. Winners will be announced in December and presented to the State Board of Education; selected pieces will be displayed at the Capitol and other locations around Salem. Students and their schools will win prizes, including art supplies. For more information, visit the website at http://goo.gl/Rbyquj or contact Amy.McLaughlin@ode.state.or.us.



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5. Performing and Visual Arts College Fair

The National Association for College Admission Counseling will present a Performing and Visual Arts College Fair at the Portland Art Museum Mark Building on Monday, September 28, 7:00-9:00 p.m. The fair is free and open to the public, and allows students to interact with admission representatives from a wide range of performing and visual arts post-secondary institutions. Learn more and register at http://www.nacacnet.org/college-fairs/PVA-College-Fairs/PVAEXH/Pages/PVAReg.aspx.



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6. Scholarships Available for Summer Media Workshops

Scholarships are available for the (POWGirls) Summer Workshops, and spots are filling quickly. POWGirls is hosted by the Portland Oregon Women’s Film Festival and The Fairie Godmother Fund of the Oregon Community foundations. If you know a girl 15-19 who is interested in media production, please encourage her to register now. The workshops are great for girls interested in drama, film, TV, advertising, marketing, business, game development, or digital media. The workshops are in August. For more information, go to http://powfest.com/summer-workshops/.



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7. Summer Design Camp

Students ages 15+ are invited to join the University of Oregon (UO) in Portland for Design Camp 2015, July 13-17 from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. This camp experience explores architecture, digital arts, and product design. Students will engage in thoughtful creative conversations, hands-on design exercises, and field trips to meet professionals in the fields of architecture and design. Cost is $800; scholarships are available by application. This year's camp is a collaboration with Portland's James Beard Public Market project. Learn more, and register, at https://aaa.uoregon.edu/design-camp-2015.



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8. Communications Scholarship

To be considered eligible for the $500 BBG Communications Scholarship you must be between the ages of 16 and 21 on June 30, 2015, have at least one full year of postsecondary studies remaining at the time of the award, and submit answers to the two essay questions (which can be found on the application page) prior to the June 30, 2015 deadline. For more information, go to http://www.breylancommunications.com/bbgcommunications/132/scholarships.php.



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Opportunities
9. Creativity Symposium for Educators

Registration is live for The Right Brain Initiative’s summer symposium at the Portland Art Museum, June 16-18. Over the course of three inspiring days, Imagine This! will help classroom teachers, arts teachers, principals, curriculum directors, and teaching artists deepen their ability to integrate the arts into the K-8 classroom setting. Partial scholarships are available. Register and read more at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/imagine-this-a-creativity-symposium-for-educators-tickets-16679570043.



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10. Summer Music Technology Hands-On Workshops

The Mike Klinger Music Technology Retreat Center will feature the summer courses listed below. For more information and to register, go to http://www.midiworkshop.com/productcart/pc/musictech_retreatcenter.asp.


Summer courses at the Retreat Center (9-3pm daily, lunch provided):

  • Teaching Music in a Connected World Using Music First (June 30-July 3)

  • Digital Songwriting & Production Workshop (July 7-10)

  • Digital Audio Recording/Editing Using Pro Tools (July 14-17)

  • Finale 2014/Smartmusic for Educators (July 21-24)

  • Sibelius for Beginners (July 28-29)

  • Sibelius for Advanced (July 30-31)

  • Music Production with Ableton Live (August 4-7)

  • Teaching Music Using Technology in the Classroom (August 11-14)

  • Private Study at the Retreat Center (any time of the year)

Summer Music Technology Online Workshops (June 22-August 28):



  • Sibelius 7.5

  • Finale 2014

  • Pro Tools

  • iPad in the Music Classroom 101

  • Teaching Music Using Technology

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11. SuperQuest2015 Summer Workshops

SuperQuest is a highly collaborative technology training series designed specifically for K-12 teachers. Put on by The Oregon Computer Science Teachers Association, their goal is to empower educators with the skills and classroom tools to build hands-on technology learning directly into their classrooms or after school activities. SuperQuest2015 workshops will be held at Umatilla, Summit, and Century High Schools, and at Rogue Community College. For more information and to register, go to http://oregoncsta.org/superquest/.



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12. Celebration of Teaching and Learning through the Arts Conference

The nationally recognized A+ Schools Program is turning 20, and they invite you to celebrate with them on August 3–5, 2015, for an evening legacy celebration followed by two days of conference networking, keynotes, break-outs, and workshop sessions in Durham, NC. Join A+ Schools for this exciting arts in education conference to celebrate, share innovative practice, explore current trends, think forward, and inspire others to a vision of a complete education that includes the arts for every student. Registration closes on July 24. Learn more and register at http://www.aplus-schools.ncdcr.gov/ConnectLearn/20thAnniversary.aspx.



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Funding Resources
13. Creative Leadership Grants

The 2015 Champion Creatively Alive Children program provides grants for innovative, creative leadership team building within elementary schools. Apply now for the opportunity to receive a grant for building your school's creative capacity. Each grant-winning school (up to 20 grants awarded) receives $2,500 and Crayola products valued at $1,000. The application deadline is June 22, 2015 (the principal must be a member of NAESP). Learn more at http://www.crayola.com/for-educators/ccac-landing/grant-program.aspx.



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Resources
14. Resources for Girls in STEM

Oregon Girls Collaborative Project

The Oregon Girls Collaborative Project (OGCP) is a statewide network of support for girl-serving STEM organizations, working to strengthen capacity, increase continuation of girl-serving STEM programs, and create more champions for gender-equity in STEM education and careers. As part of the National Girls Collaborative Project, the network has access to thousands of programs and resources that are focused on providing high quality STEM experiences for girls. Learn more at http://www.oregonask.org/ogcp.


Aspirations in Computing

The National Center for Women & Information Technology’s Aspirations in Computing program is a sweeping national talent development initiative for young women in computing and information technology, from kindergarten through graduate school. Learn more at https://www.aspirations.org/.



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Articles
15. Artists Have to Be Entrepreneurs

This HowlRound essay examines the need for artists to be entrepreneurs, and what that means. Find the essay at http://howlround.com/facing-facts-artists-have-to-be-entrepreneurs.



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16. California Lawmakers May Review Arts Education

Lawmakers in California are considering legislation that would require the state to review existing standards for arts education. If approved, the state would review the standards and either adopt, reject, or modify them by 2017. Read an EdSource article at http://edsource.org/2015/bill-proposes-review-of-californias-arts-standards/78964#.VUe3WpPMkxk.

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17. Creativity

In case you missed it, the July/August 2014 edition of The Atlantic was devoted to creativity. Here is what the magazine included:



  • Secrets of the Creative Brain – A leading neuroscientist who has spent decades studying creativity shares her research on where genius comes from, whether it is dependent on high IQ, and why it is so often accompanied by mental illness.

  • The Power of Two – Despite the mythology around the idea of the lone genius, the famous partnership of John Lennon and Paul McCartney demonstrates the brilliance of creative pairs.

  • The Creative Process – The breakthroughs, borrowings, revisions, and bold decisions behind the work of highly creative people, from Beyoncé to the lead designer of Google Glass.

  • Five Creative Solutions – Scratch-off election ballots, lab-grown meat, and more.

  • Creative Pairs, in Their Own Words – Members of creative pairs on their partners.

  • What Is Art? – Why we like what we like.

Access these articles at http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/toc/2014/07/.

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18. Do the Arts Go Hand in Hand with Common Core?

The Hechinger Report takes a look at the impact of the Common Core State Standards on arts education in this piece by Sara Neufeld, featuring an interview with Arts Education Partnership Director Sandra Ruppert. Read the article at http://hechingerreport.org/do-the-arts-go-hand-in-hand-with-common-core/.



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19. Education Department Highlights School and Museum Partnerships

Schools in some states – such as Virginia, Colorado and Tennessee – are partnering with museums to enrich student learning. The U.S. Department of Education recently highlighted these collaborations, including one in which students learned about exponents through a lesson about surrealism. Read a Washington Post article at http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/education/at-arlingtons-kenmore-middle-school-teaching-math-really-is-an-art/2015/05/17/12342ae2-f8cd-11e4-9ef4-1bb7ce3b3fb7_story.html.



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20. Girls Design Apps to Solve Real World Issues

Girls taking part in an after-school program at a California school are learning to apply technology skills to real-world problems. The Technovation program challenges students to create mobile applications that can help solve community issues. The program is part of a larger trend around Silicon Valley to inspire girls to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and math. Read a Yahoo News article at http://news.yahoo.com/girls-room-women-plot-silicon-valley-revolution-133501320.html.



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21. Hands-On Projects Help Teach STEM Concepts

A group of students at a Tennessee junior high school learned math and engineering concepts by designing, building and flying model gliders. Using the Whitebox Learning system, students analyzed the designs of other teams and designed and created a five-piece puzzle cube for classmates to solve using 3D CAD software. Read a Marysville Daily Times (Tennessee) article at http://www.thedailytimes.com/news/maryville-junior-high-s-students-create-industry-level-products-in/article_3c3d3219-f6cc-5db0-b8e6-161d48909af2.html.



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22. High Value Placed on Music Education

Teachers and parents want to expand music programs in schools, according to a recent survey. The survey included input from 1,000 teachers and 800 parents. Respondents said music education benefits students' social and emotional education, and they called for more professional development and resources. Parents and teachers said they would rather cut Advanced Placement classes or even athletics programs than music. Read an Education Week article at http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/curriculum/2015/05/survey_shows_value_teachers_an.html.



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23. History Project Supports Creativity for Students

To finish out the school year, educator Brison Harvey has students complete "20 Percent Google History" projects, inspired by Google's practice of allowing employees to spend one-fifth of their time on their own projects. Students can select a U.S. history topic and create a unique final product, such as a video game about the Great Depression or a scrapbook detailing American fashion history, Harvey explains. Read the Education Week Teacher article at http://www.edweek.org/tm/articles/2015/05/19/history-lesson-giving-students-freedom-to-create.html.



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24. How Movement Can Boost Math Skills

Walking in a specific direction – left or right – may make solving some math problems easier, according to a recent study. Data show participants were better at addition when asked to turn right and better at subtraction when asked to turn left. Read a Medical Daily article at http://www.medicaldaily.com/take-walk-be-better-math-embodied-cognition-gets-brain-thinking-sync-334994.



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25. How the Arts Create Synergy Between Subjects

A push to expand arts education into science, technology, engineering, and math has led to the momentum to turn STEM into STEAM, said Christine Marme Thompson, professor and director of the Penn State School of Visual Arts' Art Education program. "The visual arts are a powerful language for communicating concepts and theories in any field, both during the process of being developed and once they are finished 'products' to be shared with others," she said. Read a Phys Org article at http://phys.org/news/2015-05-probing-art-essential-school-subject.html.



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26. Improving Everyday Observation Skills

This Lexington Herald-Leader (Kentucky) blog examines how Amy Herman developed a program for medical students to improve their perception skills and has adapted it for the New York Police Department, FBI, and CIA. She focuses on the art of perception. Find the article at http://tomeblen.bloginky.com/2015/04/13/studying-great-art-can-help-improve-everyday-observation-skills/.



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27. Making Art Tied to Fewer Cognitive Problems in Old Age

A Mayo Clinic study finds decades spent on creative work pay off. Read a Pacific Standard article at http://www.psmag.com/health-and-behavior/making-art-tied-to-fewer-cognitive-problems-in-old-age.



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28. Michigan Elementary School to Launch STEM Classes

Jenison Public Schools will be implementing a new elementary special, called STEM, starting in the fall of 2015. This 50 minute once a week special class will provide every student in kindergarten through sixth grade with multiple problem-based experiences and activities in their weekly schedule. Read a Michigan Live article at http://www.mlive.com/news/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2015/05/jenison_public_schools_to_add.html.



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29. Mixed Reality Boosts Student Performance

Students perform about five times better with a mix of virtual and real worlds – compared with a screen-only educational game – according to a recent study from Carnegie Mellon University. Researchers studied the performance of 92 students. Read a T.H.E. Journal article at http://thejournal.com/articles/2015/05/11/young-students-learn-better-with-mix-of-virtual-and-real-worlds.aspx.



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30. Panel Focuses on Skills Learned through the Arts

Far from detracting from the core academic subjects, arts education enhances overall student achievement. Read a Grenville News (South Carolina) article at http://www.greenvilleonline.com/story/entertainment/arts/paul-hyde/2015/05/09/educators-argue-arts-support-schools/27050637/.



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31. STEM Fields Carry Different Economic Value

Not all science, technology, engineering, and math degrees guarantee high incomes, according to a recent report. Architects, for example, tend to make much less than engineers by midcareer, according to the data. The authors of the report noted that work experience, as opposed to a college degree, had a greater influence on salary outcome. Read a Fast Company article at http://www.fastcompany.com/3046151/not-all-stem-jobs-guarantee-top-wages.



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32. Students Design Accessible Fishing Pole

A group of Mosinee Middle School eighth-graders are in the midst of developing an adaptive fishing pole for a former high school principal who was paralyzed from a fall from a ladder. Read a Wausau Daily Herald (Wisconsin) article at http://www.wausaudailyherald.com/story/news/education/2015/04/12/fishing-gear-jim-debroux/25648653/.



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33. Study Examines Which Dance Offers Best Exercise for Children

Not all dance classes deliver the same amount of physical exercise for children and adolescents, according to a study in Pediatrics. The researchers found that children in hip-hop dance class spent about 57% of class time engaged in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, while flamenco was about 14% and ballet 30%. Read a San Diego Union-Tribune article at http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2015/may/18/dance-exercise-kids-pediatrics/; read a Time article at http://time.com/3882486/ballet-class-exercise/.



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34. Top Educators Use Music and Art to Teach Math and Science

Current finalists and past winners of the U.S. Teacher of the Year Award use unique techniques to teach subjects such as math and science, suggest researchers at Michigan State University who recently studied eight such methods. Some incorporate rap music and drama to illustrate math concepts, while others have used art to help students learn science. Read a Quartz article at http://qz.com/399153/americas-best-teachers-use-theater-and-rap-to-get-kids-into-math/.



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35. Top Starting Pay Goes to Engineers and Computer Scientists

Engineering and computer science graduates will land the highest starting salaries this year, according to companies surveyed by the National Association of Colleges and Employers. Those projected salaries topped $61,000, while degrees in social sciences and humanities fell below $50,000. Read an Albuquerque Business First article at http://www.bizjournals.com/albuquerque/news/2015/04/10/highest-paying-professions-recent-grads.html.



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36. Why America’s Obsession with STEM Education is Dangerous

This Washington Post article by Fareed Zakaria examines the national obsession with STEM education, and what we stand to lose by it. The ideas are further explained in Zakaria’s book, In Defense of a Liberal Education, and in an interview with Charlie Rose. Read the Washington Post article at http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/why-stem-wont-make-us-successful/2015/03/26/5f4604f2-d2a5-11e4-ab77-9646eea6a4c7_story.html?tid=pm_opinions_pop. The New York Times Sunday Book Review of Zakaria’s book calls it “an accessible, necessary defense of an idea under siege;” find the review at http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/19/books/review/fareed-zakarias-in-defense-of-a-liberal-education-and-more.html?_r=0 (scroll down). Find the Charlie Rose interview at http://www.bloomberg.com/news/videos/2015-04-02/fareed-zakaria-charlie-rose-04-02-. Read a similar Forbes article by Carol Geary Schneider, president of the Association of American Colleges and Universities, at http://www.forbes.com/2009/08/10/liberal-arts-education-curriculum-degree-opinions-colleges-geary-schneider.html.



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37. Why Liberal Arts is Super Dumb

“I want to convince the people that are reading this that even an engineer can do what liberal arts does, except that I can do it more good. Writing is not hard, and even though people in the real world do not need to use it ever, engineers could still do it super good.” Read the Mugdown satire at http://mugdown.com/2015/04/14/why-liberal-arts-is-super-dumb/.



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38. Why Teach Digital Communication?

"In the field of education today, it sometimes feels as though a relentless stream flows only in one direction. Teachers are asked to teach more, but with the same number of hours and days," writes Educational Leadership author Elizabeth Englander. In a recent Inservice post, Englander expands upon her May Educational Leadership article and examines teachers' role in helping students think about their online behavior. Read the article at http://inservice.ascd.org/why-teach-digital-communication/



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Videos, Photos, Podcasts, and Webinars
39. How We Got to Now

How We Got to Now is a book and six-part PBS documentary series by Steven Johnson that reveals the story behind the remarkable ideas that made modern life possible, the unsung heroes that brought them into the world, and the unexpected and bizarre consequences each of these innovations has triggered. A preview of How We Got to Now is at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=42yo9IZLs4M; another quick look is at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLMCtFon6E0, with a 30 second look at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_c3wqFW0WCc&index=2&list=PLzkQfVIJun2ICuePY4JvoGsFE83mag2Dj. A YouTube search will locate the episodes to this intriguing PBS series.



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Just for Fun
40. How to Gird Up Your Loins

For The Art of Manliness, How to Gird Up Your Loins: An Illustrated Guide, visit http://www.artofmanliness.com/2014/10/02/how-to-gird-up-your-loins-an-illustrated-guide/.



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41. Origin of the Common Bug

This brief Computerworld article details the story of how the word “bug” entered into the lexicon of computing. Find the article at http://www.computerworld.com/article/2515435/app-development/moth-in-the-machine--debugging-the-origins-of--bug-.html.



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42. Quotes

One has to struggle sometimes, actually, to appreciate things. Art is not easy. – Phillippe de Montebello, Curator, Metropolitan Museum of Art


Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds. – Albert Einstein, theoretical physicist
In any project, the important factor is your belief. Without belief, there can be no successful outcome. – William James, philosopher and psychologist
I stole everything I ever heard, but mostly I stole from the horns. – Ella Fitzgerald, jazz singer
Sadly, it's much easier to create a desert than a forest. – James Lovelock, scientist
No heirloom of humankind captures the past as do art and language. – Theodore Bikel, actor
Don't limit yourself. Many people limit themselves to what they think they can do. – Mary Kay Ash, businesswoman
There is nothing worse than a sharp image of a fuzzy concept. – Ansel Adams, photographer
Fear of having taken the wrong step is at least evidence that one is walking. – From Everyone Says That at the End of the World, by Owen Egerton
Rank does not confer privilege or give power. It imposes responsibility. – Peter Drucker, management consultant and writer
We may encounter many defeats, but we must not be defeated. – Maya Angelou, author and poet

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ODE Resources (in every issue)
Past editions of Creative Oregon Update: http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/page/?id=1873

Arts Announcements: http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/results/?id=7

Arts Content Standards:

Standards: http://www.ode.state.or.us/teachlearn/real/documents/ar.pdf

FAQ: http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/page/?id=1715

Arts Subject Area Endorsement Sample Scoring Guide: http://www.ode.state.or.us/teachlearn/subjects/arts/standards/sample-scoring-guide.pdf

State Adopted Instructional Materials for the Arts:

To see the list of adopted materials, go to http://www.ode.state.or.us/teachlearn/instructionalmaterials/theartscontractyrs-20062012.pdf

For more information about textbook adoption, go to http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/results/?id=92

ODE Arts web pages:

The Arts “landing” page: http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/results/?id=7

Standards: http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/page/?id=1708

Curriculum & Instruction: http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/page/?id=1712

Assessment: http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/page/?id=1709

Professional Development: http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/page/?id=1714

Content Panel: http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/page/?id=1710

Professional Organizations: http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/page/?id=1713

Publications: http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/page/?id=1711

Frequently Asked Questions: http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/page/?id=1715

Research & Support: http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/page/?=1732

Resources for Educational Achievement and Leadership (REAL): http://www.ode.state.or.us/teachlearn/real/

Oregon Diploma project: http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/results/?id=368

Education Update: http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/page/?id=3781

ODE Contact for the Creative Oregon Update:

Michael Fridley, michael.fridley@state.or.us, (503) 947-5660


****Disclaimer – The materials contained in the Creative Oregon Update produced by Oregon Department of Education are drawn from both internal and external sources and inclusion of external materials does not necessarily indicate Oregon Department of Education endorsement.****
It is the policy of the State Board of Education and a priority of the Oregon Department of Education that there will be no discrimination or harassment on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, age or disability in any educational programs, activities or employment. Persons having questions about equal opportunity and nondiscrimination should contact the Deputy Superintendent of Public Instruction with the Oregon Department of Education.


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